Difference between ODP and nurse?

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wbnurse
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#1
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#1
My brother is starting his ODP degree this year and he's basically saying it's just the same as a nurse degree....I'm confused! I didn't even know what an ODP was until recently. Is it just a nurse in 1 area? Is the degree as demanding?


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deviant182
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#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
(Original post by wbnurse)
My brother is starting his ODP degree this year and he's basically saying it's just the same as a nurse degree....I'm confused! I didn't even know what an ODP was until recently. Is it just a nurse in 1 area? Is the degree as demanding?


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I'm not too sure on the demands of that course in comparison to a nursing course.
But an odp is not a nurse.
You have theatre nurses within the theatres, each will have a different role as you have a clean nurse and a dirty nurse for example. One who works and counts the equipment used etc, and one who stays clean and sterile and works alongside the surgeon handing them what they need and maybe holding the patient or parts of them etc.
An odp role is listed here:

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...t-practitioner

However, don't let your brother think he will be a nurse.
Nurses and midwives enter a register which they need to maintain their skills to remain on the register as a nurse or midwife.
The odp is also registered but this is a different registration.
Your brother won't have the same types of placements as a nurse and will be working in various types of theatres, from emergency care to maternity etc.

He will also not be able to work as a nurse as he will be an odp. Completely different.
I suggest he reads up if he's that confused as if he wanted to do nursing he would have to complete a nursing degree.
The NHS website may clarify things for you.
Hope that helps!

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jmwatson85
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#3
Report 4 years ago
#3
Nurses and odos do a lot of the same jobs. Both can scrub in. Help with operating equipment. Monitor the patient and recover the patient however the odp is more of the anethstist right hand man. They help then when putting them to sleep. They know their way around the theatre and know far more about airway management than a nurse does. In recovery they would do the same job as s nurse but ib general a odp and a nurse are two different roles. A odp can only work in OD recovery and some critical care places and know a freat deal about airways managment and anasthetic than a nurse and they liase between tgeatre and other hispiral depts
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moonkatt
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#4
Report 4 years ago
#4
Theatre nurses and ODPs do the same roles in the perioperative environment. The only difference is that ODPs are trained to be the anaesthetist’s assistant on qualifying, whilst nurses have to do another course to undertake this role in the periop environment.
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Jude Hall
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#5
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#5
ODP 'S are increasingly working in many other areas these days such as Pre op assessment, A
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holistic-odp
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#6
Report 3 years ago
#6
(Original post by deviant182)
I'm not too sure on the demands of that course in comparison to a nursing course.
But an odp is not a nurse.
You have theatre nurses within the theatres, each will have a different role as you have a clean nurse and a dirty nurse for example. One who works and counts the equipment used etc, and one who stays clean and sterile and works alongside the surgeon handing them what they need and maybe holding the patient or parts of them etc.
An odp role is listed here:

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...t-practitioner

However, don't let your brother think he will be a nurse.
Nurses and midwives enter a register which they need to maintain their skills to remain on the register as a nurse or midwife.
The odp is also registered but this is a different registration.
Your brother won't have the same types of placements as a nurse and will be working in various types of theatres, from emergency care to maternity etc.

He will also not be able to work as a nurse as he will be an odp. Completely different.
I suggest he reads up if he's that confused as if he wanted to do nursing he would have to complete a nursing degree.
The NHS website may clarify things for you.
Hope that helps!

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I qualified as an ODP 15 years ago. ODP’s and RGN’s do much the same job in theatres. The ODP is trained in all aspects of perioperative care as part of basic pre-reg training. Both work scrub and recovery roles as a theatre practitioner. The nurse has to undertake further courses to work in anaesthetics but ODP’s cover this in basic training. Even then there are certain duties that only the ODP can do. Airway management is something ODP’s are expert in but nurses cover it very little. Nurses can leave theatres and work in all different specialities where the ODP can only ever work in a surgical or trauma type department. ODP Degree is best if you intend to stay perioperative but RGN will be best if you get bored easily or am not sure what area to specialise in.
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ryjtj
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#7
Report 4 months ago
#7
Although these things are very valid points for people that cannot decide between ODP or nursing. People don't mention certain differences that may help people decide so I thought I'd put my observations on the differences.

Again for any current nurses or ODPs seeing this. I don't mean offence by any of this, I am generalising based on what I see . I work as a HCA in Theatres and HCA bank work on a ward as well.

E.g. an ODP or any theatre role for that matter, you will do 1 patient at a time and work as a team for that one patient. You tend to work in a speciality but, you can go from caring for an adult to a child or from a hip operation to a hand if you were in Orthopaedics, you can go from a car accident, to someone that fell over, to someone that drilled into their own hand if your in Trauma, from a stomach injury to an appendix removal, to intestines if you do General. So you get see alot of variety on a daily basis, what your doing in 2 hours time could be totally different, you also have to build trust and rapport with the Patient in a short space of time for a short period of time. In some roles, such as the scrub ODP role, you may not even speak to a patient or multiple patients on your list. Alot of the time as an ODP, you don't see or deal with the patients families. Unless they are accompanying them to theatre, where you may see them for a short period before the patient is put to sleep. If its a child or an adult that has learning disabilities, MH issues, dementia, behavioural issues as an example but in general, you hardly ever have to deal with families on the phone or have visitors of the patient to deal with. Whereas, nurses have this aspect on a regular basis. That can be a positive thing and a negative thing. Depending on the kind of person you are.

As a nurse you would be caring for more people at once. Although each patient may have different illnesses, your ward will focus on 1 main thing, which tends to attract a certain kind of patient so you tend to get similar patients you deal with every day, E.g. a Demetia Male Ward would be pretty much male elderly patients. You do however, get a prolonged period to build rapport to treat them. Some patients can be on a ward for a day, a few days, some can be weeks, some even months. So you get to build rapport with their families, the patient and you tend to get to see them go from very ill to discharge. Someone that likes to see results from their work, someone that wants to focus on multiple people at once but for a longer period, or it takes you longer to build rapport with people or someone with a particular interest in nursing may be for you.
Last edited by ryjtj; 4 months ago
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jess_tay7
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#8
Report 4 months ago
#8
(Original post by ryjtj)
Although these things are very valid points for people that cannot decide between ODP or nursing. People don't mention certain differences that may help people decide so I thought I'd put my observations on the differences.

Again for any current nurses or ODPs seeing this. I don't mean offence by any of this, I am generalising based on what I see . I work as a HCA in Theatres and HCA bank work on a ward as well.

E.g. an ODP or any theatre role for that matter, you will do 1 patient at a time and work as a team for that one patient. You tend to work in a speciality but, you can go from caring for an adult to a child or from a hip operation to a hand if you were in Orthopaedics, you can go from a car accident, to someone that fell over, to someone that drilled into their own hand if your in Trauma, from a stomach injury to an appendix removal, to intestines if you do General. So you get see alot of variety on a daily basis, what your doing in 2 hours time could be totally different, you also have to build trust and rapport with the Patient in a short space of time for a short period of time. In some roles, such as the scrub ODP role, you may not even speak to a patient or multiple patients on your list. Alot of the time as an ODP, you don't see or deal with the patients families. Unless they are accompanying them to theatre, where you may see them for a short period before the patient is put to sleep. If its a child or an adult that has learning disabilities, MH issues, dementia, behavioural issues as an example but in general, you hardly ever have to deal with families on the phone or have visitors of the patient to deal with. Whereas, nurses have this aspect on a regular basis. That can be a positive thing and a negative thing. Depending on the kind of person you are.

As a nurse you would be caring for more people at once. Although each patient may have different illnesses, your ward will focus on 1 main thing, which tends to attract a certain kind of patient so you tend to get similar patients you deal with every day, E.g. a Demetia Male Ward would be pretty much male elderly patients. You do however, get a prolonged period to build rapport to treat them. Some patients can be on a ward for a day, a few days, some can be weeks, some even months. So you get to build rapport with their families, the patient and you tend to get to see them go from very ill to discharge. Someone that likes to see results from their work, someone that wants to focus on multiple people at once but for a longer period, or it takes you longer to build rapport with people or someone with a particular interest in nursing may be for you.
Hi there! It was interesting reading your post. I had a few questions about your current role. Would you be able to send me a message so I can learn a bit more? I'm interested in theatre!
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