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    I have applied for DSA and had a letter back saying the letter my doctor had written wasn't enough and could they fill in the mental health form. This they did and charged me £40 to do so. I have now heard back from them again saying yet again the evidence isn't good enough and I need more supporting evidence.

    It seems to stem from the fact my doctor hasn't stated that my anxiety and depression will last for the next 12 months, this is despite me being diagnosed in June 2014. The girl I spoke to on the phone today suggested that I could be better in a matter of weeks.

    The mental health evidence form states To be considered long term, the effect of the disability must have lasted or be likely to last at least 12 months or for the rest of the student’s life.

    However I am being told that this is not correct and it needs to show it will last at least 12 months and I have to provide additional evidence.

    I can't afford another £40, I had to go without food and paying bills to get this £40 as I am currently on benefits.

    I am seriously thinking of not even going to uni as I know I won't be able to cope without help in place and it seems applying for DSA is as difficult and as hard as they can make it so you give up.

    I only managed to get through my Access course thanks to college putting measures in place without the need to apply for DSA but uni won't do this.

    Anyone have any advice at all? I feel like giving up all together and student finance England have done nothing but increase my anxiety levels.

    Thanks
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    Just so you know you can usually get support for anxiety and depression for free through your university without DSA.

    I have dyspraxia, depression and anxiety and have only recently started applying for DSA (and this is just for my dyspraxia, my mental health was/is handled by my universities and the NHS for free). For my entire undergraduate degree I didn't need to use DSA.

    Hopefully that is some comfort! Is there a specific reason you need DSA for your depression? (i.e. is there a specific cost you need help with?).

    I would also contact the disability services at your uni, it may be possible for them to help you with contacting student finance, provide you with the support you need for free or give you the money to pay for another doctor's form via the hardship fund (though you may need to be matriculated before you can do this).

    Is there a partner, friend or relative who can talk to student finance on your behalf? Sometimes it can be easier to be present while someone else actually speaks on your behalf as you can collect your thoughts and feel calmer. They may also be able to argue more strongly in your favour (e.g. the fact that your doctor filled in the form correctly implies student finance should absorb the extra cost and you should be able to make a complaint). My partner handles my phone calls and I find this much easier.
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    That's ridiculous. Surely, it's evidence enough that it's lasted for 2 years that you're not going to suddenly wake up in a few weeks and be ok? They are right that it has to be a long term thing; but your post does imply to me that you're not going to be ok in a few weeks.
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    (Original post by monkyvirus)
    Hopefully that is some comfort! Is there a specific reason you need DSA for your depression? (i.e. is there a specific cost you need help with?).
    As I have trouble concentrating for prolonged periods then a notetaker would be ideal for me
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    (Original post by vsl_2603)
    I have applied for DSA and had a letter back saying the letter my doctor had written wasn't enough and could they fill in the mental health form. This they did and charged me £40 to do so. I have now heard back from them again saying yet again the evidence isn't good enough and I need more supporting evidence.

    It seems to stem from the fact my doctor hasn't stated that my anxiety and depression will last for the next 12 months, this is despite me being diagnosed in June 2014. The girl I spoke to on the phone today suggested that I could be better in a matter of weeks.

    The mental health evidence form states To be considered long term, the effect of the disability must have lasted or be likely to last at least 12 months or for the rest of the student’s life.

    However I am being told that this is not correct and it needs to show it will last at least 12 months and I have to provide additional evidence.

    I can't afford another £40, I had to go without food and paying bills to get this £40 as I am currently on benefits.

    I am seriously thinking of not even going to uni as I know I won't be able to cope without help in place and it seems applying for DSA is as difficult and as hard as they can make it so you give up.

    I only managed to get through my Access course thanks to college putting measures in place without the need to apply for DSA but uni won't do this.

    Anyone have any advice at all? I feel like giving up all together and student finance England have done nothing but increase my anxiety levels.

    Thanks
    Get your consultant the write the letter. They are always taken more seriously than a GP's letter!
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Get your consultant the write the letter. They are always taken more seriously than a GP's letter!
    I don't have a consultant
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    That's ridiculous. Surely, it's evidence enough that it's lasted for 2 years that you're not going to suddenly wake up in a few weeks and be ok? They are right that it has to be a long term thing; but your post does imply to me that you're not going to be ok in a few weeks.
    and @ OP, have you seen a therapist or psyche ?, doctor do a great job but they are in no way suited or ready to deal with mental health, they mainly rely on psyches and therapist and use their advice to give out script and other forms of help, apart from listening to you and offering some basic services, mental health wise, they can do much. if you have not seen the 2, then it would seem your doc didnt think your problem was serious enough or you didnt see them enough or follow their adivce, could be a range of reasons, but that a problem really. since like i said doc's arent great with mental health.

    also unless your literally willing to kill yourself or near that point/ a pych ward, a doctor wont really see you as a major threat or in need of major/serious help/ long term help. gonna be honest at the end of the day doctors cant do anything in the UK, its really up to therapist and psyches .

    On the DSA side i have no idea realy.
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    (Original post by vsl_2603)
    I don't have a consultant
    Well in that case i would ask your GP for a referral to one. I seriously see no other way of getting DSA without this. If it were simply the case that anyone could get dsa with the help of a gps letter, don't you think everybody would be doing it?

    Also something else you could try is contacting the university and asking for an independent mental health assessment. It is worth a shot, if your GP won't refer you to see a consultant, but that should still be your first line of call imho, because if you are as bad as you make out, this should not be a problem!?
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    (Original post by john2054)
    Get your consultant the write the letter. They are always taken more seriously than a GP's letter!
    Bit subjective eh?
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    OP, you need to speak to the people who process your DSA application. Askthem to crystalize exactly what's required from you at your end. If they can't,speak to a governing body, charity of similar to work out exactly what'sneeded. Then you make it crystal clear to your GP what you need from him orher. Explain the severity of the issue, the problems encountered so far andtell him or her to up their game.



    To recap: find out exactly what they want, make it clear your GP knowsexactly what they want and gives them it... Shouldn't it be that simple?Granted that could be a naive assumption as I've no experience with this - justusing common sense in the hope that it helps.
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    (Original post by vsl_2603)
    As I have trouble concentrating for prolonged periods then a notetaker would be ideal for me
    Ah, I see. Wasn't trying to be nosey, just checking if your situation was the same as mine (which it sadly isn't ).

    I would definitely talk to the disability team at your new uni, they maybe able to help you directly and their advice will be free. You may also be able to hit the ground running when you're matriculated with a DSA assessment at your uni (I had this for a note taker in my final year). There is an unfortunate delay but in the interim you should be able to get full notes sent to you directly by your lecturers.
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    Thanks to you who gave advice.

    I am pleased to say that my evidence has now been accepted and I am booked in for a needs assessment next Wednesday.

    I have also had a meeting with the disablity team at uni which was really useful.

    Feel relieved that it is finally getting sorted
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    have you tried contacting DRUK student helpline? http://www.disabilityrightsuk.org/ho...dents-helpline

    They could really help with guiding you for the evidence you need!
 
 
 
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