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Has Brexit resulted in more racism, xenophobia and bigotry? Watch

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    I'm to totally appalled and sickened by the increase in racism, xenophobic attitudes and bigotry post Brexit.

    What's wrong with some people who feel they need to celebrate their victory with this behaviour? Theres not only more Islamophobic but I've I've heard recently of shops and homes owned by East Europeans attacked by racists. They fail to remember that the Polish and Czechs joined British armed forces to defend Britain in WW2. Now their faces racial attacks.

    Most of us grew up around the time of the new millennium when we had a popular government that made people proud to be part of Europe and promoted equality for all. We were so much happier then. Now it seems we've gone back 50 years to ignorance and intolerance. I really don't like what's happening to our country.

    I just wish we could get another referendum and get back into the EU.

    Will this ever stop?
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    I absolutely agree with you, I know people voted leave for issues of who governs who, but I felt the brexit vote legitimised racism, the whole leave campaign was basically about immigration spearheaded by the likes of the nasty nigel farage and boris johnson.*

    It's frankly disgusting what has happened since, and it's doesn't help matters when the government says they cannot guarantee citizens from EU countries can remain here.*
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    Nah, I don't really buy anything you've said there.

    It's just a lot of hype over a few trouble makers, I reckon.

    And as for the EU being great - since when has that been a thing? The EU has only really been around a few years, and in it's current form even less. It's never been about tolerance or equality. It was really mostly about farming subsidies.

    The 50 years thing is bogus too. There was no EU back then, but we got on just fine. That was about the time when Britain freely let anyone from the Commonwealth just turn up and live and work here. It was just a different group of people with rights of free movement. One might say the 60s were the times of greatest cultural change and tolerance.
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    I daresay the recent spike in terror has had a much larger impact.
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    (Original post by Ambitious1999)
    I'm to totally appalled and sickened by the increase in racism, xenophobic attitudes and bigotry post Brexit.

    What's wrong with some people who feel they need to celebrate their victory with this behaviour? Theres not only more Islamophobic but I've I've heard recently of shops and homes owned by East Europeans attacked by racists. They fail to remember that the Polish and Czechs joined British armed forces to defend Britain in WW2. Now their faces racial attacks.

    Most of us grew up around the time of the new millennium when we had a popular government that made people proud to be part of Europe and promoted equality for all. We were so much happier then. Now it seems we've gone back 50 years to ignorance and intolerance. I really don't like what's happening to our country.

    I just wish we could get another referendum and get back into the EU.

    Will this ever stop?
    In answer to the question expressed in this thread's title, no it has not.
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    There was a bit more xenophobia in the days after Brexit, but the people who'd be giving the abuse seem to have forgotten about it now
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    Yaaaaaaaaaaay

    Another thread.
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    (Original post by Graham 14)
    I absolutely agree with you, I know people voted leave for issues of who governs who, but I felt the brexit vote legitimised racism, the whole leave campaign was basically about immigration spearheaded by the likes of the nasty nigel farage and boris johnson.*

    It's frankly disgusting what has happened since, and it's doesn't help matters when the government says they cannot guarantee citizens from EU countries can remain here.*
    People voted leave for the immigration and refugee crisis, short-term issues which will more than likely be sorted by the next few years (people failed to see the long term of leaving the EU and focused instead on this and not any possible changes we can make).

    It must have resulted in more racism though, as you said, it's legitimised the racist attacks (not just against arab-colour skinned people too, Polish, French and Germans living in the UK have been victims). I believe that people who try to talk-down the increase in racism are just as bad as they seem to support the racism, the stats are quite clear.
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    (Original post by Craig1998)
    People voted leave for the immigration and refugee crisis, short-term issues which will more than likely be sorted by the next few years (people failed to see the long term of leaving the EU and focused instead on this and not any possible changes we can make).

    It must have resulted in more racism though, as you said, it's legitimised the racist attacks (not just against arab-colour skinned people too, Polish, French and Germans living in the UK have been victims). I believe that people who try to talk-down the increase in racism are just as bad as they seem to support the racism, the stats are quite clear.
    It's strange that places with lowest levels of immigration voted leave i/e the midlands, whereas places with the highest levels of immigration e.g london voted remain. *
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    I think that would have happened anyway. The far right is rising all over Europe, and mostly because policy makers like Angela Merkel dealt with the crisis in an irresponsible and ideologically-motivated way that ignored the logistical and rational problems. She dealt with it like a pastor's daughter rather than a leader.

    The Brexit thing seems to have triggered financial panic in some quarters, but the other thing was already happening, and I suspect would have happened with or without it. I think people just paid more attention to it all of a sudden because of it seeming symbolic somehow.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    Nah, I don't really buy anything you've said there.

    It's just a lot of hype over a few trouble makers, I reckon.

    And as for the EU being great - since when has that been a thing? The EU has only really been around a few years, and in it's current form even less. It's never been about tolerance or equality. It was really mostly about farming subsidies.

    The 50 years thing is bogus too. There was no EU back then, but we got on just fine. That was about the time when Britain freely let anyone from the Commonwealth just turn up and live and work here. It was just a different group of people with rights of free movement. One might say the 60s were the times of greatest cultural change and tolerance.
    We joined the EEC in 1973 (43 years ago)

    Windrush was 1948. Nearly 80 years ago. Controls on Commonwealth immigration started being introduced in 1962.

    There was also a time of "no blacks no Irish" in postwar Britain.

    So much for tolerance.

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    Would have happened either way whatever the result.
    Don't think there has been more of it just more people being brave and open about their racist/bigoted views
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    (Original post by Graham 14)
    It's strange that places with lowest levels of immigration voted leave i/e the midlands, whereas places with the highest levels of immigration e.g london voted remain. *
    Bradford and Birmingham voted Leave.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    We joined the EEC in 1973 (43 years ago)

    Windrush was 1948. Nearly 80 years ago. Controls on Commonwealth immigration started being introduced in 1962.

    There was also a time of "no blacks no Irish" in postwar Britain.

    So much for tolerance.

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    And the EEC and the EU are nothing like the same thing.

    Up until the early 80s, Commonwealth people could come to UK, and if their kids were born here they had right of abode.
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    I wouldn't say there's been any more, but people are just less scared to let it out. A lot of people voted out of ignorance, and others took the result as bias confirmation that their feelings were true. I definitely had a bunch of run ins with racists way before Brexit was even an idea though
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    When you tell a small minority that the majority are just like them it makes them think they have people backing them, the rise in racism, xenophobia and bigotry is caused by the remains side to portray brexiters as scum.
 
 
 
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