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    I have withdrawn from university after deciding I do not like the institution that I studied at. I am going to be taking time off with part-time work and am interested in studying for another qualification during this time. Would I be able to study a Higher in German from home taken that I have all the correct resources and use a local school as an assessment centre?

    I was originally educated in England (my qualifications are AS and A2 Levels) but have moved to Scotland since and so don't fully understand the Scottish system.

    I am enquiring to SQA directly also.

    Any insight would be gratefully received!!
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    Yeah of course, I'm self teaching a couple of Highers this year in addition to the ones I'm doing at school and sitting the exams and unit assessments at a college. (Wallace College in Edinburgh, they allow you to do this for most subjects, including German)
    You'll need to attend the school to sit your unit assessments, for languages you'll have a unit assessment for reading, listening, writing and speaking. The unit assessments are not graded you just need to pass otherwise you can't sit the final exam. Although they are pretty easy and are set at a C grade standard.
    You'll also need to sit a speaking exam, at my school they do them in February and March. The speaking exam makes up 30% of your final grade.

    If you haven't already, then I would take a look at the documents on the Higher German page on the SQA website.
    Also I'd recommend a website called Scholar, I think most schools are registered for it, although I think you actually need to be a pupil at the school in order to have a password but there's no harm in asking the school to organise one for you.

    If you have any other questions about self teaching, or the Scottish qualifications system or Higher German then please ask I'm also doing Higher German this year, not self taught but at school.
    Hope this helps
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    (Original post by ___Sophie___)
    Yeah of course, I'm self teaching a couple of Highers this year in addition to the ones I'm doing at school and sitting the exams and unit assessments at a college. (Wallace College in Edinburgh, they allow you to do this for most subjects, including German)
    You'll need to attend the school to sit your unit assessments, for languages you'll have a unit assessment for reading, listening, writing and speaking. The unit assessments are not graded you just need to pass otherwise you can't sit the final exam. Although they are pretty easy and are set at a C grade standard.
    You'll also need to sit a speaking exam, at my school they do them in February and March. The speaking exam makes up 30% of your final grade.

    If you haven't already, then I would take a look at the documents on the Higher German page on the SQA website.
    Also I'd recommend a website called Scholar, I think most schools are registered for it, although I think you actually need to be a pupil at the school in order to have a password but there's no harm in asking the school to organise one for you.

    If you have any other questions about self teaching, or the Scottish qualifications system or Higher German then please ask I'm also doing Higher German this year, not self taught but at school.
    Hope this helps
    I was expecting a no but this is excellent news! Thank you ever so much for explaining that to me.
    Can I ask which textbooks and other written resources you use other than Scholar? I have the list of textbooks my old school used for AS and A2 German and have those at my disposal but due to discrepancies in the syllabuses I want to make sure I have covered all bases.
    Vielen Dank wieder!
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    (Original post by Postmodernist)
    I was expecting a no but this is excellent news! Thank you ever so much for explaining that to me.
    Can I ask which textbooks and other written resources you use other than Scholar? I have the list of textbooks my old school used for AS and A2 German and have those at my disposal but due to discrepancies in the syllabuses I want to make sure I have covered all bases.
    Vielen Dank wieder!
    Glad I could help
    Well our teacher said that she won't be using a textbook this year, last year for National 5 we used the Na Klar textbooks 1, 2 and 3 but I I don't know if they make ones that are more appropriate to Higher.
    So far we've been using the resources from the Education Scotland website. We've been working through the lifestyle booklet since it is our first topic and also noting any good phrases that we can use for our writing.
    I'm sure you can use the A level textbooks, AS is equivalent to Higher and A2 is slightly easier than Advanced Higher. I was considering buying the A level textbooks myself actually, they do look better. For SQA exams companies such as Leckie & Leckie make study guides although the languages ones aren't the best but there's no harm in having them anyway.

    With regards to grammar, make sure you know stuff like your cases, word order and tenses and you'll be fine. For Higher you should know present, perfect, imperfect, future and conditional. I don't think you'll need to know the subjunctive tense but I could be wrong.
    For vocab, just learning as much as you can is helpful especially if you're aiming for a high mark in the listening. I'd recommend an app called Memrise and if you Google things like German vocab then some good PDF documents will come up. I'd also recommend making a Quizlet account, you can make your own flashcards but also if you search Higher German then you will get ones that people have already made. It's available on phones and also computers/laptops.

    For your first exam (reading and directed writing) you'll get a dictionary which makes things easier. The directed writing essays can be prepared in advance as you'll have a rough idea of what topics might come up. I'm not too sure of what the possible topics are yet, if you can't find out for yourself then just ask me and I'll ask my teacher.

    For the second exam (listening and discursive writing) you won't get a dictionary. Well you definitely won't for the listening but I'm not sure if they'll hand them out for the discursive writing.
    The exam is on the 2nd of June.

    Education Scotland booklet, just click on the pdf. There might be more for other topics, I'm not too sure.
    http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/...tcm4229826.asp

    Example of a good vocab booklet, it says it's for GCSE but vocab like this will do you for Higher.
    https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...Y2NHDODPLwHV_g

    If we get given any other good resources or if I think of any other tips then I'll let you know. As with any SQA subject you need to do past papers which you can get online or you can buy the Hodder Gibson book which also includes model papers.
    Any other questions please ask!
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    (Original post by ___Sophie___)
    Glad I could help
    Well our teacher said that she won't be using a textbook this year, last year for National 5 we used the Na Klar textbooks 1, 2 and 3 but I I don't know if they make ones that are more appropriate to Higher.
    So far we've been using the resources from the Education Scotland website. We've been working through the lifestyle booklet since it is our first topic and also noting any good phrases that we can use for our writing.
    I'm sure you can use the A level textbooks, AS is equivalent to Higher and A2 is slightly easier than Advanced Higher. I was considering buying the A level textbooks myself actually, they do look better. For SQA exams companies such as Leckie & Leckie make study guides although the languages ones aren't the best but there's no harm in having them anyway.

    With regards to grammar, make sure you know stuff like your cases, word order and tenses and you'll be fine. For Higher you should know present, perfect, imperfect, future and conditional. I don't think you'll need to know the subjunctive tense but I could be wrong.
    For vocab, just learning as much as you can is helpful especially if you're aiming for a high mark in the listening. I'd recommend an app called Memrise and if you Google things like German vocab then some good PDF documents will come up. I'd also recommend making a Quizlet account, you can make your own flashcards but also if you search Higher German then you will get ones that people have already made. It's available on phones and also computers/laptops.

    For your first exam (reading and directed writing) you'll get a dictionary which makes things easier. The directed writing essays can be prepared in advance as you'll have a rough idea of what topics might come up. I'm not too sure of what the possible topics are yet, if you can't find out for yourself then just ask me and I'll ask my teacher.

    For the second exam (listening and discursive writing) you won't get a dictionary. Well you definitely won't for the listening but I'm not sure if they'll hand them out for the discursive writing.
    The exam is on the 2nd of June.

    Education Scotland booklet, just click on the pdf. There might be more for other topics, I'm not too sure.
    http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/...tcm4229826.asp

    Example of a good vocab booklet, it says it's for GCSE but vocab like this will do you for Higher.
    https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&so...Y2NHDODPLwHV_g

    If we get given any other good resources or if I think of any other tips then I'll let you know. As with any SQA subject you need to do past papers which you can get online or you can buy the Hodder Gibson book which also includes model papers.
    Any other questions please ask!
    You have dictionaries in both exams.
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    (Original post by scottishgirl163)
    You have dictionaries in both exams.
    Ah ok thanks
 
 
 
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