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    As simple and common as they sound, are arachnophobia (or any phobia for that matter) and anxiety, mental illnesses?

    If they aren't, please explain why.

    If they are, why are individuals with other illnesses like depression and OCD not treated as normal, functioning human beings?

    I don't have any disorder, but I made this thread because I lost my cool the other day when someone was really rude and insensitive to a friend of mine here on TSR, who has more than 1 psychological disorder. Also, as a student in Psychology (and Biology), this is an interesting way to gauge how people perceive the mentally ill.
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    FireFreezer77 Platopus AppleB Matrix123 CheeseIsVeg Kyx Andy98
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    (Original post by raniafern)
    As simple and common as they sound, are arachnophobia (or any phobia for that matter) and anxiety, mental illnesses?

    If they aren't, please explain why.

    If they are, why are individuals with other illnesses like depression and OCD not treated as normal, functioning human beings?

    I made this thread because I lost my cool the other day when someone was really rude and insensitive to a friend of mine, who has more than 1 psychological disorder...
    This is really interesting. Personally, I will refrain from expressing a view either way because I feel as though this is a sensitive topic which may spark quite a heated debate and do not wish to cause any offence.
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    (Original post by Platopus)
    This is really interesting. Personally, I will refrain from expressing a view either way because I feel as though this is a sensitive topic which may spark quite a heated debate and do not wish to cause any offence.
    What do you think though? There IS a definite answer...
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    (Original post by raniafern)
    What do you think though? There IS a definite answer... I'm just testing people's knowledge
    Yeah, as I said I'm keeping quiet. Sorry! Told you I hate arguments and I can just sense an oncoming argument about this.
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    (Original post by Platopus)
    Yeah, as I said I'm keeping quiet. Sorry! Told you I hate arguments and I can just sense an oncoming argument about this.
    Okay then Right, arguments... :lol:
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    A phobia is classed as an irrational fear.

    Although some phobias, such as the phobia of weapons, are rational. The phobia of weapons is described as 'an irrational fear of weapons. Someone with this phobia would say stuff such as "weapons kill people" or "weapons harm people".' I think the person who invented this had mental illness.
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    (Original post by Kyx)
    A phobia is classed as an irrational fear.

    Although some phobias, such as the phobia of weapons, are rational. The phobia of weapons is described as 'an irrational fear of weapons. Someone with this phobia would say stuff such as "weapons kill people" or "weapons harm people".' I think the person who invented this had mental illness.
    So you say that phobias are a form of mental illness, then?
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    (Original post by raniafern)
    x
    Well mental illnesses affect the way people think or behave. Phobias are, I believe, classified as a form of anxiety. Both of these affect people in multiple ways so I would say that they are mental illnesses so to speak.

    Tbh, I don't know entirely why some people are looked down on - you'd have to ask someone who actually does that for a more reliable answer. My guess is that either they feel a lot of sympathy and try to help those with mental illnesses or try to be cautious around them so as not to make the situation any worse, so much so that it could cause the individual with the mental health issues to feel belittled or patronised.
    Alternatively, others may feel superior to these people due to the differences the mental health issues cause. This can cause them to feel happier with themselves by such a comparison, instead of taking a look at who they are and being proud of what they have become.

    This isn't the case with everyone though. I find some people with mental health issues are respected greatly instead of being looked down on as such. I hope your friend is OK. With these things I think you just have to work with what you've got and make the most of any opportunities you are faced with
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    (Original post by raniafern)
    So you say that phobias are a form of mental illness, then?
    Officially, phobias are a sub-type of anxiety disorder.

    (Original post by Matrix123)
    Phobias are, I believe, classified as a form of anxiety. Both of these affect people in multiple ways so I would say that they are mental illnesses so to speak.Posted from TSR Mobile
    Correct.
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    (Original post by Kyx)
    Officially, phobias are a sub-type of anxiety disorder.


    Correct.
    :yy:

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Kyx)
    Officially, phobias are a sub-type of anxiety disorder.


    Correct.
    Thanks
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    (Original post by raniafern)
    I know I studied them :lol: Thanks though, it helps to have people who know what they're talking about

    So, we're your guinea pigs?
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    Idk I have a massive fear of spiders to the point I didn't even go to the bathroom the spider was in for 4 weeks :rofl:
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    (Original post by Kyx)

    So, we're your guinea pigs?
    Nope nope nope. Okay, that was rude. Sigh, I need to learn how to communicate Read the first post again...
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    (Original post by saraxh)
    Idk I have a massive fear of spiders to the point I didn't even go to the bathroom the spider was in for 4 weeks :rofl:
    Haha, I fear spiders too. But as long as I have a slipper bigger than the spidey, I don't mind.
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    (Original post by raniafern)
    Nope nope nope. Okay, that was rude. Sigh, I need to learn how to communicate Read the first post again...
    OK. IDK.
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    (Original post by raniafern)
    Haha, I fear spiders too. But as long as I have a slipper bigger than the spidey, I don't mind.
    The spider was massive so I ran away :lol:
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    (Original post by raniafern)
    As simple and common as they sound, are arachnophobia (or any phobia for that matter) and anxiety, mental illnesses?

    If they aren't, please explain why.

    If they are, why are individuals with other illnesses like depression and OCD not treated as normal, functioning human beings?

    I don't have any disorder, but I made this thread because I lost my cool the other day when someone was really rude and insensitive to a friend of mine here on TSR, who has more than 1 psychological disorder. Also, as a student in Psychology (and Biology), this is an interesting way to gauge how people perceive the mentally ill.
    Anxiety is a recognised mental illness, related to depression. It can (along with depression) happen spontaneously, or due to events. It can also be caused (as was mine) by long-undiagnosed autism.

    Arachnophobia, as a pathological fear, is a sub-type of anxiety afaik.

    Mental health issues and ASD do change a person, and while many want it, we can't try to live our lives pretending they're not there - neither is it a good idea to try and treat someone like me as a normal person. Each person has their needs, and they have to be recognised among those who know them. Obviously I don't have "depression/anxiety/asperger" tattooed on my head, so until you know what my need are, you'd treat me like a normal, non-depressive, non-autistic person. But once you knew me, I'd not want to be treated like a normal person, because those behaviours stress me and make me very panicky.
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    (Original post by Tootles)
    Anxiety is a recognised mental illness, related to depression. It can (along with depression) happen spontaneously, or due to events. It can also be caused (as was mine) by long-undiagnosed autism.

    Arachnophobia, as a pathological fear, is a sub-type of anxiety afaik.

    Mental health issues and ASD do change a person, and while many want it, we can't try to live our lives pretending they're not there - neither is it a good idea to try and treat someone like me as a normal person. Each person has their needs, and they have to be recognised among those who know them. Obviously I don't have "depression/anxiety/asperger" tattooed on my head, so until you know what my need are, you'd treat me like a normal, non-depressive, non-autistic person. But once you knew me, I'd not want to be treated like a normal person, because those behaviours stress me and make me very panicky.
    If I may ask, does your Asperger's make you anti-social, or develop into social anxiety?
 
 
 
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