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    I've applied for philosophy starting in September but recently I've started thinking about maybe doing a more scientific degree like biochemistry. None of my a-levels are suitable so I would have to redo them, I'm just really confused because science has never really interested me until now :/
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    (Original post by zoeelizabeth)
    I've applied for philosophy starting in September but recently I've started thinking about maybe doing a more scientific degree like biochemistry. None of my a-levels are suitable so I would have to redo them, I'm just really confused because science has never really interested me until now :/
    Get a textbook and start reading and find some online courses that interest you and make sure that you really want to change
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    See if the university you've applied to will let you switch to a science foundation degree. This is for people exactly like you that don't have the relevant a levels for the course they want to do. The foundation degree is for one year after which you can progress to a three year BSc or reapply for a different subject if you decide science is not what you want to do.
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    (Original post by Rainbow2753)
    See if the university you've applied to will let you switch to a science foundation degree. This is for people exactly like you that don't have the relevant a levels for the course they want to do. The foundation degree is for one year after which you can progress to a three year BSc or reapply for a different subject if you decide science is not what you want to do.
    I completely forgot foundation degrees were even a thing! thank you! *runs off to research foundation degrees*
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    (Original post by zoeelizabeth)
    I've applied for philosophy starting in September but recently I've started thinking about maybe doing a more scientific degree like biochemistry. None of my a-levels are suitable so I would have to redo them, I'm just really confused because science has never really interested me until now :/
    If you don't have a science background why do you suddenly think biochem is for you?

    What are your A-levels?

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    What subjects did you take at A-Level?

    I changed my degree choice from Law to History & Politics baed on the fact that I enjoyed Government & Politics and History more than Law in the 2nd year of sixth form. Make sure you choose the subject you really want to do. I'm glad I did.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    If you don't have a science background why do you suddenly think biochem is for you?

    What are your A-levels?

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    I did French, English Literature and Religious Studies at A level so my sudden interest in biochem is really bizarre. I was browsing the University of Leeds website and decided to take a look at the biochemistry degree out of curiosity and it just seems really interesting and something that I would want to pursue. so I started researching further and now I'm really confused because philosophy has always been something I wanted to do, hence why I'm here lol
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    (Original post by MaxReid)
    What subjects did you take at A-Level?

    I changed my degree choice from Law to History & Politics baed on the fact that I enjoyed Government & Politics and History more than Law in the 2nd year of sixth form. Make sure you choose the subject you really want to do. I'm glad I did.
    I did really non-science subjects i.e. French, English literature and religious studies *face palm*
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    (Original post by zoeelizabeth)
    I did French, English Literature and Religious Studies at A level so my sudden interest in biochem is really bizarre. I was browsing the University of Leeds website and decided to take a look at the biochemistry degree out of curiosity and it just seems really interesting and something that I would want to pursue. so I started researching further and now I'm really confused because philosophy has always been something I wanted to do, hence why I'm here lol
    So you really need to do more research on the subject. Check out some books from course reading lists, have a look at relevant MOOCs, YouTube vids, etc etc.

    https://www.edx.org/course/principle...arvardx-mcb63x
    https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/biochemistry

    And then investigate science Foundation Years.
    Eg
    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/biosci/...r_science.page
    http://www.ls.manchester.ac.uk/under...oundationyear/
    http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/courses/i...nce-foundation

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    (Original post by zoeelizabeth)
    I did French, English Literature and Religious Studies at A level so my sudden interest in biochem is really bizarre. I was browsing the University of Leeds website and decided to take a look at the biochemistry degree out of curiosity and it just seems really interesting and something that I would want to pursue. so I started researching further and now I'm really confused because philosophy has always been something I wanted to do, hence why I'm here lol
    All university degree descriptions are designed to make the degree look interesting, but it doesn't show the mountain you would have to climb to get to the point where you can start getting to the interesting bits if you don't have any science background. Be very sure that you aren't just having a crush on a subject, because you don't want to embark on a really quite major change of direction on a whim.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    So you really need to do more research on the subject. Check out some books from course reading lists, have a look at relevant MOOCs, YouTube vids, etc etc.

    https://www.edx.org/course/principle...arvardx-mcb63x
    https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/biochemistry

    And then investigate science Foundation Years.
    Eg
    http://www.southampton.ac.uk/biosci/...r_science.page
    http://www.ls.manchester.ac.uk/under...oundationyear/
    http://www.llc.leeds.ac.uk/courses/i...nce-foundation

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    thanks for your advice/help
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    All university degree descriptions are designed to make the degree look interesting, but it doesn't show the mountain you would have to climb to get to the point where you can start getting to the interesting bits if you don't have any science background. Be very sure that you aren't just having a crush on a subject, because you don't want to embark on a really quite major change of direction on a whim.
    that's very true, I hadn't considered that it could just be a sort of "phase", I have had a lot of those in the past, I used to want to be an architect I'm so indecisive but I definitely want to go to university hence the dilemma!
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    (Original post by zoeelizabeth)
    that's very true, I hadn't considered that it could just be a sort of "phase", I have had a lot of those in the past, I used to want to be an architect I'm so indecisive but I definitely want to go to university hence the dilemma!
    You gravitated towards arts A levels because that's most likely where your talents lie, and that is quite an important consideration. I speak as an arts person myself, and know that I wouldn't be able to cram the kind of scientific knowledge very well because I don't have the background or the personality type. Of course, you may be different. My honest and sincere advice to you, or anybody who doesn't know what subject they want to do, is to wait until you do. People who are successful at university are usually so because they go to university to study a subject, not because they want to be a student. Get a job until you know what you want to study and you will avoid some very expensive, miserable or pointless months. You really, really do not have to go to university at 18.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    You gravitated towards arts A levels because that's most likely where your talents lie, and that is quite an important consideration. I speak as an arts person myself, and know that I wouldn't be able to cram the kind of scientific knowledge very well because I don't have the background or the personality type. Of course, you may be different. My honest and sincere advice to you, or anybody who doesn't know what subject they want to do, is to wait until you do. People who are successful at university are usually so because they go to university to study a subject, not because they want to be a student. Get a job until you know what you want to study and you will avoid some very expensive, miserable or pointless months. You really, really do not have to go to university at 18.
    I think you are so right about me being gravitated towards arts A levels, I've been told on numerous occasions that my essay writing skills are pretty good and I did enjoy studying my A levels. And you're probably right that I should get a job but I've honestly wanted to go to university since I was 11. I know I should get a better idea about careers but I don't think I could face waiting, it sounds ridiculous I know. Thanks to everyone's great advice I think I'm going to stick with philosophy, since it is something I've been interested in for the longest, I even asked my college to do the A level as they didn't offer it previously. Hopefully at the end of it I can do a masters in a certain field, maybe journalism? or a PGCE and become a teacher! at least by studying something I'm enthusiastic about I can find a job that suits me.I really appreciate all of your advice!
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    The other option may be to look at a Liberal Arts degree (possibly with sciences) that lets you sample across a wider range of subjects.

    e.g. UCL (but there are others)
    https://www.ucl.ac.uk/basc

    Although some of the science options may have prerequisite science A-levels.

    Sounds like a year out (at least) may be in order to give yourself time to experience more and make some better informed decisions.
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    (Original post by zoeelizabeth)
    I've applied for philosophy starting in September but recently I've started thinking about maybe doing a more scientific degree like biochemistry. None of my a-levels are suitable so I would have to redo them, I'm just really confused because science has never really interested me until now :/
    I understand what you're saying. But that happens to me all the time. I'm at uni now and I still look up courses like Psychology and weird stuff like Computer Science and think "oh that sounds interesting". But often enough, a uni degree isn't enough for you to find "interesting", especially if you have no A-levels in the sciences.

    Unless you did Bio and Chem (I know you haven't) then I very much doubt you'd understand what Biochem at uni will entail apart from reading the descriptions of modules from random universities.

    Even if you are interested in these kinds of stuff, maybe your uni has philosophy modules on things like Medical Ethics, Philosophy of Psychiatry, Philosophy of Science, Evolution of the Mind, etc etc. There is a lot of science in philosophy if your uni specializes in that field.

    I think it was just a fleeting moment you had. You can read a dozen philosophical works on science such as motion, time, the human body, mathematics, nature and natural materials, etc. Just pick up a book that is solely dedicated to the philosophy of science and you'll be loving Philosophy! :P
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    You sound a lot like how I used to be I picked my course and then went on a uni website and decided I really liked the look of Radiography. I went as far as messaging the course leader asking about clearing. I do think it's a case of you liking the sound of something, but the reality of it being very different. I've been ridiculously indecisive throughout my education. I planned to apply for biology, had all my choices set out, then decided I wanted to do anthropology, which I ended up applying for. Once I had my offers I decided I didn't want to let go of biology, but I also wanted to do history. So I asked to swap to a degree in Biological Sciences and History. I started uni and two weeks in decided I wanted to switch the History side to Ancient History, which I did despite knowing I've ALWAYS preferred modern history. I got halfway through my second year and realised I absolutely hated Ancient History, it was boring and I never liked it. So I dropped it and my degree was now straight Biological Sciences, so right back to where my original plans were :lol: I'm the perfect example of why you should always make up your mind before going to university, because there's no rush.

    What I'm basically saying is that sometimes indecisiveness is a very bad thing, you could end up very unhappy like I was, and although I'm extremely happy now studying Biology, I could have ended up at a dead end. You obviously picked your subject because you really enjoy it, and I think you should either do more research into biochemistry to see if it's really what you want, or realise that your heart does indeed belong to philosophy

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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    I understand what you're saying. But that happens to me all the time. I'm at uni now and I still look up courses like Psychology and weird stuff like Computer Science and think "oh that sounds interesting". But often enough, a uni degree isn't enough for you to find "interesting", especially if you have no A-levels in the sciences.

    Unless you did Bio and Chem (I know you haven't) then I very much doubt you'd understand what Biochem at uni will entail apart from reading the descriptions of modules from random universities.

    Even if you are interested in these kinds of stuff, maybe your uni has philosophy modules on things like Medical Ethics, Philosophy of Psychiatry, Philosophy of Science, Evolution of the Mind, etc etc. There is a lot of science in philosophy if your uni specializes in that field.

    I think it was just a fleeting moment you had. You can read a dozen philosophical works on science such as motion, time, the human body, mathematics, nature and natural materials, etc. Just pick up a book that is solely dedicated to the philosophy of science and you'll be loving Philosophy! :P
    I've had a look at the module catalogue and there are some really great modules that seem very interesting! I've also learned that Leeds (my firm) offer discovery modules, so I could opt to do some chemistry/biology modules if I really wanted too!Thanks for replying, I'm so glad I posted because everyone has been so helpful and to be honest I was having a bit of a crisis! haha
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    (Original post by zoeelizabeth)
    I've had a look at the module catalogue and there are some really great modules that seem very interesting! I've also learned that Leeds (my firm) offer discovery modules, so I could opt to do some chemistry/biology modules if I really wanted too!Thanks for replying, I'm so glad I posted because everyone has been so helpful and to be honest I was having a bit of a crisis! haha
    I study Philosophy at uni and it's sooo interesting because it's so varied!

    Oh I recommend you do that in your first year! I took an Education module and a Japanese Modern History module in my first year and it was so worth it. Well the Japanese one was anyway. 1st year in most subjects is often recapping the subject knowledge or skills your gained during A-level years anyway, so I'm sure you'll be fine with those science modules!

    Going to uni is an often exciting time but can lead you astray sometimes! :flutter:
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    (Original post by Changing Skies)
    You sound a lot like how I used to be I picked my course and then went on a uni website and decided I really liked the look of Radiography. I went as far as messaging the course leader asking about clearing. I do think it's a case of you liking the sound of something, but the reality of it being very different. I've been ridiculously indecisive throughout my education. I planned to apply for biology, had all my choices set out, then decided I wanted to do anthropology, which I ended up applying for. Once I had my offers I decided I didn't want to let go of biology, but I also wanted to do history. So I asked to swap to a degree in Biological Sciences and History. I started uni and two weeks in decided I wanted to switch the History side to Ancient History, which I did despite knowing I've ALWAYS preferred modern history. I got halfway through my second year and realised I absolutely hated Ancient History, it was boring and I never liked it. So I dropped it and my degree was now straight Biological Sciences, so right back to where my original plans were :lol: I'm the perfect example of why you should always make up your mind before going to university, because there's no rush.

    What I'm basically saying is that sometimes indecisiveness is a very bad thing, you could end up very unhappy like I was, and although I'm extremely happy now studying Biology, I could have ended up at a dead end. You obviously picked your subject because you really enjoy it, and I think you should either do more research into biochemistry to see if it's really what you want, or realise that your heart does indeed belong to philosophy

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    I think you deserve a medal for being indecisive haha! I've done a lot of research over the past 2 years into my philosophy degree, and it is definitely something that interests me. I've had a look back at some of the stuff I found and there are definitely science based modules I can take if I haven't changed my mind about being interested in science-y stuff by the time I start my degree :' hopefully everything will work itself out in the end! EDIT: I emailed admissions this morning to see about maybe changing my course to joint honours French and Philosophy, sigh I am very indecisive hahaha
 
 
 
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