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    Okay so I'm starting uni in september studying Sociology with Human Rights. I am planning on moving to the US once I've finished my sociology degree, going to law school there and then becoming a lawyer. I have a US passport, so that's not an issue but... it makes me really nervous to think of how to fund going to uni basically twice, especially if my law career isn't especially lucrative money-wise. However, I don't think I'm ready by any means to move there now, and go to law school in another country at 18. I'm just very unsure of how I'd go about it all... help??
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    (Original post by pluvophile)
    Okay so I'm starting uni in september studying Sociology with Human Rights. I am planning on moving to the US once I've finished my sociology degree, going to law school there and then becoming a lawyer. I have a US passport, so that's not an issue but... it makes me really nervous to think of how to fund going to uni basically twice, especially if my law career isn't especially lucrative money-wise. However, I don't think I'm ready by any means to move there now, and go to law school in another country at 18. I'm just very unsure of how I'd go about it all... help??
    Any particular reason why you want to practice law in the US and not the UK given the added training costs?

    I'm not really sure what you're asking. As I'm sure you know, law is a graduate degree in the States so you need to do an undergraduate degree before you can start anyway. It doesn't really matter where you do this degree, here or there. I believe that you can sit the New York bar exam with a UK LLB degree; you don't need an American LLM or JD... so it might make more sense for you study law in the UK rather than sociology. California allows holders of a UK LLB degree who have also successfully qualified as solicitors or barristers in the UK (meaning you have also completed an LPC or BPTC and a training contract or pupillage) to sit their bar exam.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Any particular reason why you want to practice law in the US and not the UK given the added training costs?

    I'm not really sure what you're asking. As I'm sure you know, law is a graduate degree in the States so you need to do an undergraduate degree before you can start anyway. It doesn't really matter where you do this degree, here or there. I believe that you can sit the New York bar exam with a UK LLB degree; you don't need an American LLM or JD... so it might make more sense for you study law in the UK rather than sociology. California allows holders of a UK LLB degree who have also successfully qualified as solicitors or barristers in the UK (meaning you have also completed an LPC or BPTC and a training contract or pupillage) to sit their bar exam.
    So, do you recommend I see if I can apply (most likely through clearing) to study law instead? Im aware of conversion courses existing, so couldn't I do a conversion course after taking sociology that would mean that I'd have a UK LLB at the end? Thankyou!
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    (Original post by pluvophile)
    So, do you recommend I see if I can apply (most likely through clearing) to study law instead? Im aware of conversion courses existing, so couldn't I do a conversion course after taking sociology that would mean that I'd have a UK LLB at the end? Thankyou!
    I'm not going to recommend you take a certain course, it is up to you. Certainly don't do a LLB unless you are interested in the academic study of law. I only mentioned it because it might save you time and money. The New York bar doesn't accept law conversion courses, not sure about California. Where do you actually want to live in the US?
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    American firms won't bother with you without an ivy league school/oxbridge. It would be a lot easier to just get seconded and stay.
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    (Original post by Fermionic)
    American firms won't bother with you without an ivy league school/oxbridge. It would be a lot easier to just get seconded and stay.
    Where is the evidence for this (absurd) statement? A simple LinkedIn search proves you wrong.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Where is the evidence for this (absurd) statement? A simple LinkedIn search proves you wrong.
    It's not an absurd statement, high-paying/white shoe NY firms won't go near you. OP has a passport which helps, but that's the reality.
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    (Original post by Fermionic)
    It's not an absurd statement, high-paying/white shoe NY firms won't go near you. OP has a passport which helps, but that's the reality.
    So you have no proof?
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    So you have no proof?
    Lots of anecdotal stuff, i'm currently seconded to the US. I wanted to do it myself before i qualified, now i know that would be insane given the competition/costs of grad school. Much, much easier to get seconded. Sure, OP would have a chance, but, should he bet the 200k cost of grad school on it? Nah.
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    (Original post by Fermionic)
    Lots of anecdotal stuff, i'm currently seconded to the US. I wanted to do it myself before i qualified, now i know that would be insane given the competition/costs of grad school. Much, much easier to get seconded. Sure, OP would have a chance, but, should he bet the 200k cost of grad school on it? Nah.
    If he wants to work in New York then he doesn't need to pay for grad school, he just needs to do a LLB and pass the bar exam. I have no doubt that competition is fierce, but that is true of everywhere.
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    If you want to do law for a career, why on earth are you taking a sociology degree now not a law one?

    I did a sociology degree, at University of Manchester -it was really pointless. If you want to be a lawyer, start down that path now, get all the experience you can.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    If he wants to work in New York then he doesn't need to pay for grad school, he just needs to do a LLB and pass the bar exam. I have no doubt that competition is fierce, but that is true of everywhere.
    He really does if he wants to have a shot, those firms do not recruit outside of the Ivy League/Oxbridge. If he's good enough to get into the latter then yeh, good luck to him. But then, if he was, i doubt he'd be on this forum asking such a question.

    The competition is not comparable to London, also there's hardly any risk when one gets a TC.
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    (Original post by Fermionic)
    He really does if he wants to have a shot, those firms do not recruit outside of the Ivy League/Oxbridge. If he's good enough to get into the latter then yeh, good luck to him. But then, if he was, i doubt he'd be on this forum asking such a question.

    The competition is not comparable to London, also there's hardly any risk when one gets a TC.
    Where are you getting this idea from? Getting into a big NY/Chicago firm is very competitive and they pick almost exclusively from T14 schools when recruiting those who have a JD. The easier way is to get into a firm here and then getting a secondment to the USA


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    Where are you getting this idea from? Getting into a big NY/Chicago firm is very competitive and they pick almost exclusively from T14 schools when recruiting those who have a JD. The easier way is to get into a firm here and then getting a secondment to the USA


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    That's exactly what i've been saying...
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Any particular reason why you want to practice law in the US and not the UK given the added training costs?

    I'm not really sure what you're asking. As I'm sure you know, law is a graduate degree in the States so you need to do an undergraduate degree before you can start anyway. It doesn't really matter where you do this degree, here or there. I believe that you can sit the New York bar exam with a UK LLB degree; you don't need an American LLM or JD... so it might make more sense for you study law in the UK rather than sociology. California allows holders of a UK LLB degree who have also successfully qualified as solicitors or barristers in the UK (meaning you have also completed an LPC or BPTC and a training contract or pupillage) to sit their bar exam.
    Certainly you can take the Bar without a US JD or LLM, but US law firms heavily favour those with JD degrees - regardless of whether you have completed a law degree elsewhere plus the Bar.

    OP: I would recommend, if you really want to practice law in the states to either apply for those Universities in the US who offer scholarships or do law in the UK, get a training contract and then look to move over post qualification which would be easiest if your TC was with a US firm. The latter option is obviously more time consuming and also more risky.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    If he wants to work in New York then he doesn't need to pay for grad school, he just needs to do a LLB and pass the bar exam. I have no doubt that competition is fierce, but that is true of everywhere.
    You'd really struggle to be hired by any firm in the US without a JD.

    The competition in New York is insane. It makes getting a TC in London for a US or MC firm look like a walk in the park.


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    (Original post by LawStudentLLM)
    Certainly you can take the Bar without a US JD or LLM, but US law firms heavily favour those with JD degrees - regardless of whether you have completed a law degree elsewhere plus the Bar.

    OP: I would recommend, if you really want to practice law in the states to either apply for those Universities in the US who offer scholarships or do law in the UK, get a training contract and then look to move over post qualification which would be easiest if your TC was with a US firm. The latter option is obviously more time consuming and also more risky.
    (Original post by J-SP)
    You'd really struggle to be hired by any firm in the US without a JD.

    The competition in New York is insane. It makes getting a TC in London for a US or MC firm look like a walk in the park.


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    Fair enough, but I still don't believe that US firms will only hire Oxbridge/Ivy grads (which was Fermionic's main point).
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Fair enough, but I still don't believe that US firms will only hire Oxbridge/Ivy grads (which was Fermionic's main point).
    From my experience, they are pretty picky. It might not matter where your undergrad degree was, but they will expect a high GPA on a JD from a high ranking US university. You'd need an exceptional GPA from other universities and a stellar CV (from what I saw anyway).


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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Fair enough, but I still don't believe that US firms will only hire Oxbridge/Ivy grads (which was Fermionic's main point).
    No not at all. Not even all the Ivies do law. It is more centred on the T14 law "schools" for law (top 14), and also the on the schools just outside of the T14.

    In the US hiring from schools is heavily based on class rank. The higher up the T14 your school is the more percentage of students they will take from that school, and the lower your class rank can be to make you competitive. E.g. Big law firms might interview the Top 50% from Yale (towards the top of the T14) as opposed to interviewing the Top 15% from UCLA (just outside the T14) for example. Obviously students from lower ranking schools can get in to big law firms too, but only the top top students would get in, and the good performing others would be competitive at smaller US firms.

    Obviously also those figures aren't exact, and applications consider more than just grades, but in the US it is much more heavily relied on. So going to an Ivy which offers law would be an advantage, but not the be all and end all. Much like going to a Russell Group university in the UK although in the UK class rank etc. isn't relied on so heavily.
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    (Original post by Fermionic)
    That's exactly what i've been saying...
    Ivy League and t14 aren't the same thing


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