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    Do most of you get grants or do you use your own money?

    And do you think it's worth doing PhD self financing?
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    I had a grant as did all of my fellow students in the chemistry department. Personally I don't think it is worth pursuing a PhD if you can't get a grant.
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    lol hold on, you were fighting with us a few weeks ago when we told you that not all phd students were funded. why have you changed your tune?
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    (Original post by The Boosh)
    lol hold on, you were fighting with us a few weeks ago when we told you that not all phd students were funded. why have you changed your tune?
    He's still a scientist. Scientists are spoilt in that respect.:p:
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    Noway, if only everyone's funded. I know it for fact that not everyone's that lucky. But I did notice that the majority are funded or half funded. Obviously it's more cost effective to have someone else finance your degree. But then to get the money you need excellent grades since most people who do PhD are top achievers. Back then I was arguing a different topic, I think it was whether you need to do a master to proceed onto PhD? Anyway I take it that you're funded too.
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    (Original post by The Boosh)
    lol hold on, you were fighting with us a few weeks ago when we told you that not all phd students were funded. why have you changed your tune?
    I have become more wise in the mysteries of the research councils. However, I missed off an important bit there, it should have said:

    I don't think there is any point in doing a phd full-time if you can't get a grant.
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    (Original post by ChemistBoy)
    I have become more wise in the mysteries of the research councils. However, I missed off an important bit there, it should have said:

    I don't think there is any point in doing a phd full-time if you can't get a grant.
    Is that the case for all people in your department?
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    ^^ nonono lol sorry, i was referring to lorrybeep, who threw a wobbler at us when we ganged up and said funding was actually uncommon.

    in terms of your comment about full time phd and grants, i'll leave that one open. i wouldnt do a full time phd without financial support at all, i certainly wouldnt take a bank loan for one. but, having said that, ive always had my thumbs in various pies and worked for the uni as well as receiving departmental and research council scholarships so im the fortunate few. i know loads of international students from the middle east and asia who get paid filthy amounts of cash to do a phd in the uk then fly back to their own country and get filthy rich flashing their british phds around. their governments are a lot more willing to depart with cash than ours.
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    EPSRC - I dont know what the equivalent is for Arts.

    I wouldnt bother doing a Phd if i couldnt get the funding.

    you could try writing to charities - who might fund you . .
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    (Original post by hermaphrodite)
    EPSRC - I dont know what the equivalent is for Arts.

    I wouldnt bother doing a Phd if i couldnt get the funding.

    you could try writing to charities - who might fund you . .
    Charities? Like who? Is it even possible? Do I need to alter my PhD thesis according to their needs if they decide to fund me?
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    I wrote this for someone a few weeks ago. If you can't get a research council scholarship, then these different routes could help:

    "If I were you, and if funding is an issue (i.e. nobody you know can pay for you and you can't/won't take a bank loan) then my choice of course would be filtered by those departments that had money to offer. These may be few and far between, but you may find that some departments have a little bit of money that they share out between a group of students (this happened to me for my MSc and my fees were cut in half), or you may find departments with full departmental studentships (fees+bursary), or you may find departments with research council studentships to offer. A few years ago I lived with two guys who were given scholarships for an MSc in Bio-informatics (fee-waiver and £6,000 bursary for living costs) simple because they were British!!! Only 4 Brits were on the course and the scholarships were for home students only, so they got it by default really (and, because they were "scholars" not students, their degree was up-graded to an MSc-MRes rather than MSc because they were being paid to research particular things). I know it's hard, but if you really need the cash then finding departments with cash might be a good idea.

    On the other hand, I know plenty of students who work part-time/full-time (from teaching to working behind bars or in the university library) and study part-time-full time. I worked part-time (as a research assistant) during my MSc and studied full time - other people worked full-time and studied part time. It can be done, and it's not as hard as you think, but it's definitely harder than studying full time without working (the trade-off may be a social life, but if you work behind the student union bar then a different kind of social life could emerge).

    Check www.jobs.ac.uk and, under the humanities section, look for studentships/courses - sometimes funded courses are advertised here (look regularly!!!).

    Failing this - try looking out for academic posts within departments (these posts may/maynot be linked to your masters, but you can still study part-time or full-time and work part-time or full-time). Look (on www.jobs.ac.uk under the jobs section, in addition to the studentship/course section) for research assistant posts, assistant editor posts, teaching assistant posts etc. These may sound like grand titles, but research assistant work is really really really really easy, and editing assistants answer emails, read papers and check them against criteria for publishing in a journal, and feedback to the editor etc - easy stuff.

    And, I suppose last of all - if you cannot find anything (and try all the options at the same time, without putting all your eggs in the same basket and risking missing other opportunities) - try emailing every single department asking if they can support in anyway. A lot of research "academic assistant" posts are advertised internally (hence why I've had so many - too many- opportunities). A member of staff might be an editor for a journal and needs a hand, or a small research project has just started and they need somebody to work just a couple of hours a week here and there so it's not work advertising publically. Word of mouth is a powerful thing if you are allowed to listen. Don't just speak to admin staff - they have standard protocols and are likely to copy and paste the same answer to everybody who has asked the funding question over the last 10 years. definitely email them, but also email course directors etc asking for help (make a generic email yourself and fire it off to loads of people - a "no" is better than not knowing!!).

    Don't give up!!! When it comes down to it, you can work part-time, study part-time and enjoy financial independence in a different way - you choose where to work and choose where to study.

    Oooooh, one more idea - don't just look at fees (they are often standard!!) but look at costs of living. Some may offer cheap halls for postgrads which will be a big bonus, especially if you can do all your washing etc there and no extra cash is needed for bills etc and no silly 12 month contract if you dont want it - cheaper the better!)"
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    http://www.postgraduatestudentships....ding/charities

    i just googled - this is the first thing that popped up . . u can try more yourself . . but io wud assume your phd would then be tailored to their interest and there wud be less flexibility to do ur phd on wot it was that U specifically wanted to do.

    i cant really give u full details - cos it's not sumthing i've read up on - but wot i've just said there is my intuition
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    ur at UCL - so i'm sure application shall stand out - or are u competing against fellow UCL students and oxbridge candidates
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    (Original post by lorrybeep)
    Charities? Like who? Is it even possible? Do I need to alter my PhD thesis according to their needs if they decide to fund me?
    yes it is possible, but you have to be very clear and in line with their politics. ive had cash from a particular charity, but it wasnt a scholarship exactly, but more of a package of funding for research (i was an external they effectively bought in from the university).
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    (Original post by hermaphrodite)
    ur at UCL - so i'm sure application shall stand out - or are u competing against fellow UCL students and oxbridge candidates
    that wont make the slightest difference, unfortunately.
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    assuming all other variables are equal but one graduated from UCL and the other from Manchester say - wouldnt the UCL candidate have better chance - we are assuming all other variables are equal
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    No.
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    (Original post by lorrybeep)
    Is that the case for all people in your department?
    You don't start a PhD studentship in the physical sciences unless you have funding. Project funding is allocated to your supervisor and he in effect hires you to carry out the research for the project. It can't work another way because we are talking about experimental projects that cost millions of pounds and so individual research proposals seperately considered for each student would not be feasible. This also explains why most science students know little about research funding, it is only now that I am a member of staff that I am becoming aware of the ins and outs of it.
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    (Original post by hermaphrodite)
    assuming all other variables are equal but one graduated from UCL and the other from Manchester say - wouldnt the UCL candidate have better chance - we are assuming all other variables are equal
    nope. your institution doesnt matter the slightest. your department does, and so does what you know and what skills you possess. there is no "prestige" in the postgrad world, only on tsr. some of the best academics are located in the universities which are situated low down in the league tables. if i can speak on behalf of the other some of the other postgrads, some of our worst experiences have come from those who have contact with oxbridge at postgrad.
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    ^^^ the last sentence - i read it on this forum somewhere else recently
 
 
 

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