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    Hello, I just graduated from a top 20 university in the U.S., as an international student. My degrees were Neuroscience (B.S.) and Economics (B.A.). I have been interested in studying medicine in the UK, and possibly living there in the long term.
    I have searched online that the following UK medical schools accept non-EU internationals for graduate entry program:

    Queen Mary’s University of London
    Imperial College School of Medicine
    King’s College London, School of Medicine
    Nottingham
    Oxford University

    My graduating cumulative GPA was 3.75, with science 3.83 science GPA (math, chemistry, biology, physics). Would UK schools care about the difference?

    Biomedical Research:
    I have done research in three different labs. First two were both in short-term. I mainly learned many techniques in different research fields. In my third lab, I have been consistently working for 1 year so far, with about 15-20hrs/week. I also have one co-author publication from this lab. I will continue working here until medical school.

    Volunteers:
    Hospital volunteer escorting patient for 1 year (150 hrs).
    Hospital volunteer playing with pediatric patients for 1 year (~120hrs) ongoing

    ECs:
    Leadership positions in two student organizations
    Undergraduate clinical research associate assisting various clinical research in the field of Epidemiology, Neurology, and Clinical Research Center.

    Work:
    Since this June, I have been working in clinical research (Ophthalmology) as a lead unmasked technician. I prepare the drug being administered and monitor the treatment process, which is usually done by a physician. From this job, I get a lot more patient interaction, and feel very excited for my patients who are receiving a promising treatment that is not available elsewhere.

    Reference Letter:
    I am confident that my letter writers would write me a strong letter as I know them pretty well personally.

    English Skills:
    English is not my first language, but I am proficient enough to communicate in various settings including class discussion, in the clinic, in research, and in socials. I have seen a significant improvement in my English skills within the 4 years I studied in the US.

    I have thought about U.S. medical schools before. However, due to the competitiveness and my foreign status, I have a lot more restrictions getting in one. Also, I would love to study/live in the UK, which is a very different environment with great medical education.


    My questions:
    1.Do I have any chance to study medicine in the UK? I have not taken A-level or IB. I am planning to take the UKCAT in September 2016, and BMAT in November 2016.
    2.Is it possible for non-EU internationals to get residency (surgical specialty) after medical school?
    3.Is research also a focus for medical professionals in the UK?
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    If you meet the entry requirements then apply. That's the only way you'll find out if it's worth it.
    Non-EU internationals have a lot of visa restrictions and foundation year jobs are very competitive so think/research that in more detail and then decide if it's worth it.
    You can get involved in research early on by intercalating as part of your medical degree (but check if you still can as a GEP student). I'm not sure that's a good way to go for you though as you will already have a BSc degree in a basic science when you start. There are opportunities to do MDs or PhDs later on in your training but research is always secondary to your medical career and training.
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    (Original post by Zoeyjj)
    Hello, I just graduated from a top 20 university in the U.S., as an international student. My degrees were Neuroscience (B.S.) and Economics (B.A.). I have been interested in studying medicine in the UK, and possibly living there in the long term.
    I have searched online that the following UK medical schools accept non-EU internationals for graduate entry program:

    Queen Mary’s University of London
    Imperial College School of Medicine
    King’s College London, School of Medicine
    Nottingham
    Oxford University

    My graduating cumulative GPA was 3.75, with science 3.83 science GPA (math, chemistry, biology, physics). Would UK schools care about the difference?

    Biomedical Research:
    I have done research in three different labs. First two were both in short-term. I mainly learned many techniques in different research fields. In my third lab, I have been consistently working for 1 year so far, with about 15-20hrs/week. I also have one co-author publication from this lab. I will continue working here until medical school.

    Volunteers:
    Hospital volunteer escorting patient for 1 year (150 hrs).
    Hospital volunteer playing with pediatric patients for 1 year (~120hrs) ongoing

    ECs:
    Leadership positions in two student organizations
    Undergraduate clinical research associate assisting various clinical research in the field of Epidemiology, Neurology, and Clinical Research Center.

    Work:
    Since this June, I have been working in clinical research (Ophthalmology) as a lead unmasked technician. I prepare the drug being administered and monitor the treatment process, which is usually done by a physician. From this job, I get a lot more patient interaction, and feel very excited for my patients who are receiving a promising treatment that is not available elsewhere.

    Reference Letter:
    I am confident that my letter writers would write me a strong letter as I know them pretty well personally.

    English Skills:
    English is not my first language, but I am proficient enough to communicate in various settings including class discussion, in the clinic, in research, and in socials. I have seen a significant improvement in my English skills within the 4 years I studied in the US.

    I have thought about U.S. medical schools before. However, due to the competitiveness and my foreign status, I have a lot more restrictions getting in one. Also, I would love to study/live in the UK, which is a very different environment with great medical education.


    My questions:
    1.Do I have any chance to study medicine in the UK? I have not taken A-level or IB. I am planning to take the UKCAT in September 2016, and BMAT in November 2016.
    2.Is it possible for non-EU internationals to get residency (surgical specialty) after medical school?
    3.Is research also a focus for medical professionals in the UK?
    Of course you can, I'm a graduate entry medic at imperial and out of the 46ish of us 3 are americans (with american degrees). As long as you meet the entry requirements for each university theres no reason why you can't apply. You shouldn't need to do A levels, but make sure you email each university and ask what their entry requirements are in terms of your GPA.

    Currently graduates can work here (and in fact your first job is guaranteed) but this could change, not sure...

    research isn't exactly a "focus". However if you wish to do research, there is nothing stopping you can is quite often encouraged. What I mean by not being focused on is that its not a requirement.

    But you have to be aware that the places for international students is limited.

    Also imperial no longer does a "graduate" programme. While they still call it a graduate programme, its 5 years and no longer 4 years like the course i'm on. Doesn't mean yo ucan't apply to the 5 year "graduate" programme thoguh. and if you choose to dismiss imperial, it works out fine for you anyway since you're currently interested in 5 universities (including imperial), however you can only choose 4 to apply to.
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    1) Yes. Your research experience in particular is good (although you will be up against people who have completed full PhDs). Many English universities don't like taking american qualifications as they are too broad, but this is more applicable to PhD entry than graduate medicine and it will not be an absolute barrier.
    2) Do you mean in the UK? Yes - you will enter the foundation program like everyone else. If you don't know what the Foundation program is I suggest you do some research on British training structures - you are forced to do useless training in other specialities before doing what will actually help you with your career goals. Training is also much longer.
    If you mean in the US then that will be very difficult and it would be better to train in the US clearly.
    3) Yes. The system wastes so much research opportunity but you can sometimes get involved as a junior. Plus there are academic programs that have more research focus.
 
 
 
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