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    For example. One of the causes of cellular senescence is chromatin disruption... can anyone explain this in simpler terms? I'll give rep
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    (Original post by EvilScientist)
    For example. One of the causes of cellular senescence is chromatin disruption... can anyone explain this in simpler terms? I'll give rep
    DNA doesn't just exist in the cell nucleus as a big long loose strand - it's too long and would take up too much space. Because of that, it is organised into tight structures known as chromosomes. There are however a few steps between being purely loose DNA and being bound up in a chromosome, with each step the DNA becoming more and more tightly bound.

    At one point in this process between loose DNA and a chromosome, the loose DNA wraps around a protein called histone. By wrapping itself around a protein lots of times it reduces the space it needs to be stored when there is no active gene transcription happening. Lots of histones all with DNA wrapped around then wrap around each other, further reducing space. Those whole complex, broadly, is known as chromatin.

    The function of this is not just space-saving. It also helps regulate gene transcription and protect the DNA from mutations.

    Disruption of this process or this structure is effectively chromatin disruption. The DNA is not stored correctly, so it cannot be regulated.

    Cellular senescence describes the state of a cell where there is no new cell devision - the cell is paused. The reason this happens when the chromatin is disrupted is because in a state where there is no organisation of the DNA, there is a high likelihood of a mistake being made during either gene transcription or mitosis. This could lead to mutations, cancer, etc.

    It's basically a fail-safe mechanism. If the DNA is not correctly stored, the cell stops.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    DNA doesn't just exist in the cell nucleus as a big long loose strand - it's too long and would take up too much space. Because of that, it is organised into tight structures known as chromosomes. There are however a few steps between being purely loose DNA and being bound up in a chromosome, with each step the DNA becoming more and more tightly bound.

    At one point in this process between loose DNA and a chromosome, the loose DNA wraps around a protein called histone. By wrapping itself around a protein lots of times it reduces the space it needs to be stored when there is no active gene transcription happening. Lots of histones all with DNA wrapped around then wrap around each other, further reducing space. Those whole complex, broadly, is known as chromatin.

    The function of this is not just space-saving. It also helps regulate gene transcription and protect the DNA from mutations.

    Disruption of this process or this structure is effectively chromatin disruption. The DNA is not stored correctly, so it cannot be regulated.

    Cellular senescence describes the state of a cell where there is no new cell devision - the cell is paused. The reason this happens when the chromatin is disrupted is because in a state where there is no organisation of the DNA, there is a high likelihood of a mistake being made during either gene transcription or mitosis. This could lead to mutations, cancer, etc.

    It's basically a fail-safe mechanism. If the DNA is not correctly stored, the cell stops.
    Thank you beska you have opened my mind. For the next 14 days you will have unimaginable and amazing luck (placebo effect... it works) (btw thank you so much for the explanation)
 
 
 
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