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    I've got my eye on a curved large monitor.

    But the issue is the actual tower. I want it to be fast. I mainly use excel and browse the internet. Sometimes watching a movie if I have time.

    http://www.box.co.uk/Acer_Aspire_XC-705_1898831.html

    Is that good enough for what I need it for?


    Thanks
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    (Original post by accno1)
    I've got my eye on a curved large monitor.

    But the issue is the actual tower. I want it to be fast. I mainly use excel and browse the internet. Sometimes watching a movie if I have time.

    http://www.box.co.uk/Acer_Aspire_XC-705_1898831.html

    Is that good enough for what I need it for?


    Thanks
    This is more than enough for what you want. I've never been a fan of Acer (had a low end machine and it was terrible) but a quad core i5 and 8GB of RAM will suffice. In all fairness an i3 would probably be fine.

    That said these sorts of pre built boxes are often much worse than something you can custom build yourself, and upgrade at your leisure.

    Excel, watching movies and web browser are all fairly low resource applications. The only real exception is Google Chrome if that's your browser of choice. Sometimes it can struggle on 8GB (and even 16GB). Otherwise this is more than fine.

    That said I recommend looking at the monitor you intend to use. If you're looking at something higher than 1080p (so a QHD or UHD monitor) it'll likely use display ports. If this is the case you'd benefit from an on board graphics card (to take the heavy lifting away from the CPU and potentially offer alternative means of connection. I highly doubt this computer would run a 4K monitor particularly well, especially when you consider it probably won't support the newest HDMI standards (and therefore may not even work at 4K).

    So ultimately yes it is probably fine but if your monitor is a high resolution it could struggle. And as always you can build better.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    This is more than enough for what you want. I've never been a fan of Acer (had a low end machine and it was terrible) but a quad core i5 and 8GB of RAM will suffice. In all fairness an i3 would probably be fine.

    That said these sorts of pre built boxes are often much worse than something you can custom build yourself, and upgrade at your leisure.

    Excel, watching movies and web browser are all fairly low resource applications. The only real exception is Google Chrome if that's your browser of choice. Sometimes it can struggle on 8GB (and even 16GB). Otherwise this is more than fine.

    That said I recommend looking at the monitor you intend to use. If you're looking at something higher than 1080p (so a QHD or UHD monitor) it'll likely use display ports. If this is the case you'd benefit from an on board graphics card (to take the heavy lifting away from the CPU and potentially offer alternative means of connection. I highly doubt this computer would run a 4K monitor particularly well, especially when you consider it probably won't support the newest HDMI standards (and therefore may not even work at 4K).

    So ultimately yes it is probably fine but if your monitor is a high resolution it could struggle. And as always you can build better.
    http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/computi...32564-pdt.html

    Could you recommend a well priced i5 desktop tower that would work well with this screen?
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    http://www.fiercepc.co.uk/custom-ironwing-am3-based

    why not this?
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    (Original post by accno1)
    http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/computi...32564-pdt.html

    Could you recommend a well priced i5 desktop tower that would work well with this screen?
    The machine you linked in your original post is perfectly fine for that monitor. You won't run into any issues whatsoever. My issues with Acer are personal preference (and quite frankly ever since building my own PC I find all the models bought in stores to be pretty bad).

    If you wanted to spend a little more money you could look at this:

    http://www.currys.co.uk/gbuk/computi...39005-pdt.html

    It's a bundle that comes with the same monitor you wanted I believe, has a low end GPU if you did decide to do anything more taxing with the computer and is generally a more modern machine (Gen 6 instead of Gen 4 i5 processor, 2TB storage instead of 1TB, etc.) and as far as I'm concerned HP is a more reputable brand than Acer.

    But there's absolutely no need to change your mind as the machine you originally linked should work fine.
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    What brand is that? I haven't heard of them before and their product branding seems very extreme, suggests it's a heavy gaming desktop?

    I'm just after a simple by be good Windows desktop which has very good reviews and runs very fast
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    (Original post by accno1)
    What brand is that? I haven't heard of them before and their product branding seems very extreme, suggests it's a heavy gaming desktop?

    I'm just after a simple by be good Windows desktop which has very good reviews and runs very fast
    It's just a custom PC built by Fierce using standard hardware. I believe their cases are unique to them though. Downside with this one is it's using pretty cheap AMD stuff, because by default AMD offers cheaper gear at lower qualities. Both i5's mentioned in the thread will outperform the AMD processor and at a lower temperature.

    The PC in question isn't really very gaming oriented. It'll do gaming but it's not overly powerful. It's really just a gaming styled version using similar hardware to what you'd get in the other PC's mentioned.

    Worth noting on this one is that you have to install your own OS. So add on at least £100 to buy a copy of Windows and be prepared to do all that work yourself. Not a fan of stock coolers either, you may find it getting pretty toasty. Stick with Intel.

    Actually in hindsight by buying the AMD custom built machine you'd be paying more money to have a less powerful processor, a low end graphics card you don't really need and more faffing around setting it up.
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    (Original post by accno1)
    What brand is that? I haven't heard of them before and their product branding seems very extreme, suggests it's a heavy gaming desktop?

    I'm just after a simple by be good Windows desktop which has very good reviews and runs very fast
    Yeah, I'm aware of that. But seeing the price of the one you showed, you can get a decent build for around the same price or less. It's a custom built pc. A company builds the pc that has your desired parts.
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    (Original post by J-ved)
    Yeah, I'm aware of that. But seeing the price of the one you showed, you can get a decent build for around the same price or less. It's a custom built pc. A company builds the pc that has your desired parts.
    It's not cheaper though. The default configuration is no OS. You have to pay an extra £70 or £110 to get an OS installed which makes it more expensive than the Acer in the OP.

    I'm all for custom PC's and they're ultimately the best solution in virtually every scenario. But realistically speaking the PC you linked won't give a performance boost large enough to justify the cost. Given that a GPU is unnecessary (albeit nice) for what the OP has in mind a straight up comparison of the processors indicates the cheaper, older PC in the OP outperforming the one you linked.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    It's not cheaper though. The default configuration is no OS. You have to pay an extra £70 or £110 to get an OS installed which makes it more expensive than the Acer in the OP.

    I'm all for custom PC's and they're ultimately the best solution in virtually every scenario. But realistically speaking the PC you linked won't give a performance boost large enough to justify the cost. Given that a GPU is unnecessary (albeit nice) for what the OP has in mind a straight up comparison of the processors indicates the cheaper, older PC in the OP outperforming the one you linked.
    Fair point. Thanks for correcting me!
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    It's not cheaper though. The default configuration is no OS. You have to pay an extra £70 or £110 to get an OS installed which makes it more expensive than the Acer in the OP.I'm all for custom PC's and they're ultimately the best solution in virtually every scenario. But realistically speaking the PC you linked won't give a performance boost large enough to justify the cost. Given that a GPU is unnecessary (albeit nice) for what the OP has in mind a straight up comparison of the processors indicates the cheaper, older PC in the OP outperforming the one you linked.
    I buy my windows licenses from eBay, usually they're about £10, but that's just me.
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    (Original post by BasharAssad)
    I buy my windows licenses from eBay, usually they're about £10, but that's just me.
    While you can I don't recommend it. Those licences come from all sorts of machines. While they are legitimate you have no idea whether they were OEM installed, original keys and so on. In rare cases you're paying for fake or hacked software. I've gone through a load of hassle trying to use a licence from an old HP machine brought from Currys on a brand new custom built rig. It was not simply a matter of installing and using the key and I ran into issues where the key did not match the version of Windows I wanted. Looks like Windows keeps track of which keys are meant to be installed on which machines. You can move them around but it doesn't always work seamlessly.

    While you can do it this way the recommend way is to go through Microsoft or a certified vendor. You're guaranteed to get new licences this way, rather than licences pulled from somewhere else. If there's one piece of software I want to work on a PC it's the OS. I don't even recommend installing an OS yourself if you don't know what you're doing. It's very difficult to mess up but I always find the uninformed find a way to break things.
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    While you can I don't recommend it. Those licences come from all sorts of machines. While they are legitimate you have no idea whether they were OEM installed, original keys and so on. In rare cases you're paying for fake or hacked software. I've gone through a load of hassle trying to use a licence from an old HP machine brought from Currys on a brand new custom built rig. It was not simply a matter of installing and using the key and I ran into issues where the key did not match the version of Windows I wanted. Looks like Windows keeps track of which keys are meant to be installed on which machines. You can move them around but it doesn't always work seamlessly.While you can do it this way the recommend way is to go through Microsoft or a certified vendor. You're guaranteed to get new licences this way, rather than licences pulled from somewhere else. If there's one piece of software I want to work on a PC it's the OS. I don't even recommend installing an OS yourself if you don't know what you're doing. It's very difficult to mess up but I always find the uninformed find a way to break things.
    what I do is install a fresh copy of windows, purchase the key and activate through Microsoft, the key can't be fake as it goes through Microsoft servers to authenticate it, it's most likely an OEM key, but hey I'm not complaining, a fully legit copy of windows for 1/10th of the price.
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    (Original post by BasharAssad)
    what I do is install a fresh copy of windows, purchase the key and activate through Microsoft, the key can't be fake as it goes through Microsoft servers to authenticate it, it's most likely an OEM key, but hey I'm not complaining, a fully legit copy of windows for 1/10th of the price.
    This is the advisable way to do it. I've seen sellers that insist you use their boot media which just yells "dodgy OS". Only mentioned in case anyone decides to try it themselves.

    Thinking about it they have to be OEM keys. There's no other way to get keys and profit from it. As long as it works it's all good. It's when it doesn't work (OEM key locked to a specific brand or some rubbish) that you have issues. I think this was an older thing though and not too common anymore. Fewer variations on Windows helps that too.

    If anyone does try it make sure you buy the correct key for the version you want to install. Don't get a basic key when you need to use a premium version of the OS and so on.
 
 
 
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