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    I have finished my GCSEs and awaiting the results, I know it is a little early to be wondering this, but...
    I have always wanted to be an architect and had a focus on going to bath uni as it is one of the best in the country for architecture, although I have a passion for the US and would love to study architecture at one of their universities as I think it would be an amazing experience and put me in a great position to get a job at the end of the course, maybe even stay on to live in the states!
    I was wondering how difficult it is to get into a uni over there as an international student, and if anyone has any recommendations for a levels to take, tips about which Universities are good for architecture over there, how difficult it is to get in, how to put myself in a good position etc. I have only heard about MIT being good for architecture from someone I know.
    Thanks
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    I don't know much about applying to the US, although I would recommend you visit MIT's website as it has a lot of information for international students wishing to apply. This site is also very good: http://www.fulbright.org.uk/study-in-the-usa

    If you want to be an architect then you need to study a professional architecture degree, but you can only do that at grad school in America (meaning you need to do a BA/BSc degree first before you can even start). Whilst you can study architecture as an undergraduate degree at MIT, it isn't a professional degree and it is not accredited by the NAAB (the NAAB, or the National Architectural Accrediting Board is the regulatory body in the US that decides who can become an architect).

    If you want to be an architect in the UK then you need to do a RIBA-accredited course, but no American undergraduate architecture degree is accredited with them. More information here: https://www.architecture.com/RIBA/Be...architect.aspx
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I don't know much about applying to the US, although I would recommend you visit MIT's website as it has a lot of information for international students wishing to apply. This site is also very good: http://www.fulbright.org.uk/study-in-the-usa

    If you want to be an architect then you need to study a professional architecture degree, but you can only do that at grad school in America (meaning you need to do a BA/BSc degree first before you can even start). Whilst you can study architecture as an undergraduate degree at MIT, it isn't a professional degree and it is not accredited by the NAAB (the NAAB, or the National Architectural Accrediting Board is the regulatory body in the US that decides who can become an architect).

    If you want to be an architect in the UK then you need to do a RIBA-accredited course, but no American undergraduate architecture degree is accredited with them. More information here: https://www.architecture.com/RIBA/Be...architect.aspx
    Great thanks! I will have a look at the links
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    It's bloody hard. You need to be doing extracurriculars now

    Start preparing for your standardised tests too after results day
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    Very nice city MIT is in! I love Boston!
    However, MIT is HEAVILY focused on sciences therefore you may end up doing more science than architecture so make sure you check out the course information.
    If you've got the grades, got a good personal statement I don't see why you couldn't get in but it is also much more expensive than going to a UK university.
    I considered American universities but instead am choosing universities in the UK with exchange programmes to the states because I think I'd get homesick staying so far from home for so long. All things to consider but I think if you're good enough, if you study hard, you should be able to get in.
    Hope this helped.

    Edit: As said by others, American universities depend more on extracurricular therefore MIT probably does too but not as much as Ivy I don't think.
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    Hi,
    Its good you are thinking ahead. MIT is very hard to get into - but not impossible! Keep in mind that they only enrol 150 international students per year. You would be pretty much sorted in terms of a job if you went there. How did your GCSEs go, what are you expecting to get?
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    (Original post by Shadow Hunters)
    MIT probably does too but not as much as Ivy I don't think.
    This comparison is nonsense
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    Hi, I'm thinking of applying to the US and I'm in year 13 next year. I'd highly recommend that if you're serious about applying, you should book your SAT very soon. You'll need to do that through the Collegeboard, which is basically Americas standardised test administrator and they have lots of help there. Dates for the SAT get taken up pretty quick so book it now, I'd recommend you do it in Nov or Dec 2016 so you can do it again if need be and you have it out of the way of your AS studies. Also, start practicing early!!!
    With regards to MIT, you'll also need to do 2 SAT subject tests, one out of bio chem and physics, and a Maths test. you can find their requirements on their admissions website. I'd recommend doing these after year 12 or towards the end of year 12 because they test a lot of stuff that's already on the AS syllabus.
    Other than this, I think just generally stay very organised, it's a long road and if you're applying to the US you'll really need to do your own research and actually speak to people. I'm sure your schools career advisors can help you out greatly.
    I hope this helps!
    Good luck next year
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    (Original post by computationchive)
    You would be pretty much sorted in terms of a job if you went there.
    Lol, no one is sorted for a job no matter where they go...

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    (Original post by Student403)
    This comparison is nonsense
    Right, okay okay.
    MIT isn't in the Ivy League which is a competitive group of universities all involved in SPORTS together therefore it makes sense that they would concentrate more on sports. I looked into it and they are a "sports conference made up of 8 sports teams". ( The 8 Ivy League universities. )
    My phrasing was incorrect, the Ivy League concentrate more on sports than other universities however extra curricular is important to MIT also just more in the science field I would say. I don't really want an argument out of this, I was only trying to help, I don't know for sure, nor do you.
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    (Original post by Shadow Hunters)
    Right, okay okay.
    MIT isn't in the Ivy League which is a competitive group of universities all involved in SPORTS together therefore it makes sense that they would concentrate more on sports. I looked into it and they are a "sports conference made up of 8 sports teams". ( The 8 Ivy League universities. )
    My phrasing was incorrect, the Ivy League concentrate more on sports than other universities however extra curricular is important to MIT also just more in the science field I would say. I don't really want an argument out of this, I was only trying to help, I don't know for sure, nor do you.
    Just because the Ivy Leagues are in a sports conference, does not mean they concentrate more on sports in admission to their university compared to that of others, like Stanford, not in the Ivy League. (referring to the bolded part). MIT is also in sports leagues, the following to be exact:


    But this doesn't mean they concentrate on sports in admissions. None of them look for sports and if you don't have them, think less of you. (Unless you're an applying as a recruited athlete obviously)

    I know you don't want an argument - neither do I - but it annoys me when people say things that have no basis.
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    (Original post by computationchive)
    Hi,
    Its good you are thinking ahead. MIT is very hard to get into - but not impossible! Keep in mind that they only enrol 150 international students per year. You would be pretty much sorted in terms of a job if you went there. How did your GCSEs go, what are you expecting to get?
    Yeah I know it would be difficult, but I think if I start preparing early I think I could give it a shot!
    I get my GCSE results on 25th August, I am expecting to get all A* and A grades, and am moving to the best school in my borough for sixth form as they are really good at helping people apply for uni.
    I'm trying to keep in mind that it is unlikely because over 5000 apply and only about 150 get in, but I am pretty passionate and want to give it a good go.
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    (Original post by Uni12345678)
    Hi, I'm thinking of applying to the US and I'm in year 13 next year. I'd highly recommend that if you're serious about applying, you should book your SAT very soon. You'll need to do that through the Collegeboard, which is basically Americas standardised test administrator and they have lots of help there. Dates for the SAT get taken up pretty quick so book it now, I'd recommend you do it in Nov or Dec 2016 so you can do it again if need be and you have it out of the way of your AS studies. Also, start practicing early!!!
    With regards to MIT, you'll also need to do 2 SAT subject tests, one out of bio chem and physics, and a Maths test. you can find their requirements on their admissions website. I'd recommend doing these after year 12 or towards the end of year 12 because they test a lot of stuff that's already on the AS syllabus.
    Other than this, I think just generally stay very organised, it's a long road and if you're applying to the US you'll really need to do your own research and actually speak to people. I'm sure your schools career advisors can help you out greatly.
    I hope this helps!
    Good luck next year
    Thanks for all your information, I have looked into the sats but just wanted to make sure that if I take it this year it will still count when I am applying to MIT as it will have been a year since I took the test, do you know if it will still count?
    I am going to a new school for sixth form which has an amazing reputation for helping students get into uni, although I don't know how good they are with American unis yet!
    Have you taken the sats and can you tell me how you found them, anything really challenging that I should focus on, I have only had a look at the maths and science ones, can you tell me which others I will have to take?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by SRGW19)
    Thanks for all your information, I have looked into the sats but just wanted to make sure that if I take it this year it will still count when I am applying to MIT as it will have been a year since I took the test, do you know if it will still count?
    I am going to a new school for sixth form which has an amazing reputation for helping students get into uni, although I don't know how good they are with American unis yet!
    Have you taken the sats and can you tell me how you found them, anything really challenging that I should focus on, I have only had a look at the maths and science ones, can you tell me which others I will have to take?
    Thanks
    Last I checked, test scores are valid for 5 years or so, so you'll be fine

    the maths level 2 is quite easy if you've taken further maths AS, otherwise need a bit of self teaching. The science ones are AS + A2 knowledge + maybe some more, but not nearly in as much depth. So again you can look over it yourself
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    (Original post by SRGW19)
    Thanks for all your information, I have looked into the sats but just wanted to make sure that if I take it this year it will still count when I am applying to MIT as it will have been a year since I took the test, do you know if it will still count?
    It will still count. I don't think they expire in just a year.

    I am going to a new school for sixth form which has an amazing reputation for helping students get into uni, although I don't know how good they are with American unis yet!
    Communication via your school is essential to apply to US schools - they'll be sending in recommendations, transcripts, etc so do tell them your plans as early as possible.


    Have you taken the sats and can you tell me how you found them, anything really challenging that I should focus on, I have only had a look at the maths and science ones, can you tell me which others I will have to take?
    Thanks
    If you're talking about SAT subject tests, I'm preparing for them after finishing up my A-levels and they're most probably easier than AS, but have a different testing pattern which will take a short amount of time to get used to.

    I think you'll need to do Maths Level 2 and a science (physics, preferably).

    I don't want to be that guy, but considering how competitive HYPSM applications are, especially for international students, please do have a back-up plan. Don't neglect your A levels preparing for standardised tests; I've seen many peers do exactly that only to crash and burn.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by Ayman!)
    It will still count. I don't think they expire in just a year.



    Communication via your school is essential to apply to US schools - they'll be sending in recommendations, transcripts, etc so do tell them your plans as early as possible.




    If you're talking about SAT subject tests, I'm preparing for them after finishing up my A-levels and they're most probably easier than AS, but have a different testing pattern which will take a short amount of time to get used to.

    I think you'll need to do Maths Level 2 and a science (physics, preferably).

    I don't want to be that guy, but considering how competitive HYPSM applications are, especially for international students, please do have a back-up plan. Don't neglect your A levels preparing for standardised tests; I've seen many peers do exactly that only to crash and burn.

    Good luck!
    I have already looked into unis in the UK because I will still apply to those as my back up, and I may also look at other unis in the US because although MIT is good for architecture, I also want the experience of studying in the US, so I will probably have a back up US uni aswell!
    Everyone keeps talking about the 2 subject tests, but other than that is there a more general or another test I have to take?
    I have already signed up to college board and have been looking at the practice tests so I will be ready to take them whenever I decide to do it
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    (Original post by SRGW19)
    I have already looked into unis in the UK because I will still apply to those as my back up, and I may also look at other unis in the US because although MIT is good for architecture, I also want the experience of studying in the US, so I will probably have a back up US uni swell!
    The US is probably good to look into then considering it has 1000s of universities to choose from.


    Everyone keeps talking about the 2 subject tests, but other than that is there a more general or another test I have to take?
    I have already signed up to college board and have been looking at the practice tests so I will be ready to take them whenever I decide to do it
    Um, there's the SAT Reasoning Test (the main SAT basically) or an alternative would be the ACT, but you just said you did the SAT, right? You won't need to do it again as long as you're satisfied with the score.
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    (Original post by SRGW19)
    I have already looked into unis in the UK because I will still apply to those as my back up, and I may also look at other unis in the US because although MIT is good for architecture, I also want the experience of studying in the US, so I will probably have a back up US uni aswell!
    Everyone keeps talking about the 2 subject tests, but other than that is there a more general or another test I have to take?
    I have already signed up to college board and have been looking at the practice tests so I will be ready to take them whenever I decide to do it
    You will have to do 3 tests altogether (minimum) the SAT reasoning test, which is the one that you hear all Americans talking about, and two SAT subject tests, which are required by some but not all American colleges. These can be completed in a variety of subjects but for MIT it'll have to be a science and a maths paper.
 
 
 
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