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    I hear a lot of people saying don't cram you'll regret it you need to study throughout the year.

    But what actually is studying throughout the year? It just seems so broad and unspecific
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    Reinforcing your knowledge throughout the year. So frequent revision of your lecture material.

    I can attest to cramming being absolutely awful, stressful and not good for getting great marks (for most people, I know there are some people who do well cramming).
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Reinforcing your knowledge throughout the year. So frequent revision of your lecture material.

    I can attest to cramming being absolutely awful, stressful and not good for getting great marks (for most people, I know there are some people who do well cramming).
    What do you mean by frequent revision what exactly do you mean?
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    (Original post by LPauling)
    What do you mean by frequent revision what exactly do you mean?
    Not sure how much more simply I can put it....

    Go over your lecture material throughout the year.

    What methods you use (reading, re-writing, flash cards etc) to revise is up to you.
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    (Original post by LPauling)
    I hear a lot of people saying don't cram you'll regret it you need to study throughout the year.

    But what actually is studying throughout the year? It just seems so broad and unspecific
    Hello

    When it comes to studying at university, you obviously have your 'contact hours' which are hours spent with your lecturer and then you independent study which is a larger amount of hours - this is where you do further reading or books from the reading list to further you knowledge - it's time where you chase your passion for the subject. Study the module, write some practice assignments etc.
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    For me, studying throughout the semester looks like this:

    Pre-lecture: Do the basic required reading to get the basics of the lecture

    At the lecture: take notes

    Post-lecture: Do additional reading, combine all reading notes and lecture notes to write out a topic study guide. These notes should be able to explain everything you have learnt on that topic in a way that someone picking it up for the first time can understand.

    Week following the lecture: Re-read the topic study guide and highlight any key parts. This reinforces your memory and understanding of the topic. This is a crucial part of my study routine.

    In the month running up to exams: Consolidate the info from the detailed study guides into more concise study guides, eventually narrowing it down enough to fit onto flashcards. This is how I've managed to get straight first class grades without cramming.
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    Through the year I always attempt the problem sheets, and attend as many lectures and tutorials as I can. At the start of the term I try to read through the day's notes, and annotate them with explanations of anything that isn't immediately straight forward, but I'll admit, I usually fall behind in this as the term progresses, and towards the last few weeks, I barely do anything besides turning up for lectures...

    And then when it comes to study leave/exam time, I end up skimmimng through the whole course and retrying every problem sheet/ doing any past papers that are available.
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    (Original post by LPauling)
    I hear a lot of people saying don't cram you'll regret it you need to study throughout the year.

    But what actually is studying throughout the year? It just seems so broad and unspecific
    It depends on the type of memory you have.

    I have to cram, not like a few days before the exam, but at least 2 weeks before an exam, I will just focus on that exam for hours on end each day just cause, imo, I find constantly reviewing notes and reading throughout the year just doesnt work for me. As it comes to the end of the year, I'd simply just forget what reviewing I did, so I just cram from now one. Also know your limits. I can only revise for about 6 hours per day before my brain refuses to take in anymore information.

    So know your limitations and etc, before revising for exams. You need to know what revision method works for you well in advance.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    It depends on the type of memory you have.

    I have to cram, not like a few days before the exam, but at least 2 weeks before an exam, I will just focus on that exam for hours on end each day just cause, imo, I find constantly reviewing notes and reading throughout the year just doesnt work for me. As it comes to the end of the year, I'd simply just forget what reviewing I did, so I just cram from now one. Also know your limits. I can only revise for about 6 hours per day before my brain refuses to take in anymore information.

    So know your limitations and etc, before revising for exams. You need to know what revision method works for you well in advance.
    What methods work well for you, I know you said you cram but what do you actually do for those two weeks
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    (Original post by LPauling)
    What methods work well for you, I know you said you cram but what do you actually do for those two weeks
    I have a short term memory loss, so I literally can't make a mindmap and stare at it cause my memory absorb he information.

    So, I usually read a few bits and then rewrite the whole thing. Then usually rewrite them to bull formats. I re-write-re-write and keep doing that until I can turn away and remember what i wrote word for word. Once this happens, I'll put it onto flash cards and move onto the next topic. Repeat the process, whilst obviously going over the previous flash cards too.

    I usually highlight and use 3 different colour pens. My brain recognises/remembers my hand motor skills. It's very odd but I remember stuff when i write them out, rather than say them or just look at them. Kinetic revision I think it's called.
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    Nah screw that, for exams cramming works a lot better as a method of learning, at least for STEM courses. My year of my course is known for it's high scores, we're also known for being the guys that doing everything very last minute. It's worth going to lectures and having a read through all the content of each module once in a while though so you have an idea of what you need to learn once you get around to the cramming.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Nah screw that, for exams cramming works a lot better as a method of learning, at least for STEM courses. My year of my course is known for it's high scores, we're also known for being the guys that doing everything very last minute. It's worth going to lectures and having a read through all the content of each module once in a while though so you have an idea of what you need to learn once you get around to the cramming.
    Got any tips on cramming?
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    (Original post by LPauling)
    I hear a lot of people saying don't cram you'll regret it you need to study throughout the year.

    But what actually is studying throughout the year? It just seems so broad and unspecific
    The idea of studying for the year is to familiarise and gain few ideas from the course content. Studying in general is a marathon not a sprint. Personally if I have free time after assignments etc I like to read topics lightly up to the point of revision that already I have a starting point. Best advice, I would also give is during the year experiment and try a whole repertoire of studying techniques e.g. flashcards, posters, highlighters etc. But basically you have to remember why they make say a unit 12 weeks roughly long, it's to build understanding and to make it more than just a "painting" but more of a "network".
    I hope that helps
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    I live by cramming 100% However this doesn't exempt you from making sure you understand the course material. Having to memorize exam fodder is one thing, but when you're trying to cram in such a limited amount of time, as well as trying to understand it is a nightmare.
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    (Original post by Scienceguy62)
    The idea of studying for the year is to familiarise and gain few ideas from the course content. Studying in general is a marathon not a sprint. Personally if I have free time after assignments etc I like to read topics lightly up to the point of revision that already I have a starting point. Best advice, I would also give is during the year experiment and try a whole repertoire of studying techniques e.g. flashcards, posters, highlighters etc. But basically you have to remember why they make say a unit 12 weeks roughly long, it's to build understanding and to make it more than just a "painting" but more of a "network".
    I hope that helps
    Some courses aren't built like that; especially humanities.

    One week you'll be reading Marxism in Jane Eyre, then the next week, you'll be studying Psychoanalysis in Dracula.

    Most courses do not give you time to let anything sink in for more than 2 weeks. Times this by 2-4 other modules at the same time, it barely gives you room to grasp concepts you're not already familiar with.
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    (Original post by The Empire Odyssey)
    Some courses aren't built like that; especially humanities.

    One week you'll be reading Marxism in Jane Eyre, then the next week, you'll be studying Psychoanalysis in Dracula.

    Most courses do not give you time to let anything sink in for more than 2 weeks. Times this by 2-4 other modules at the same time, it barely gives you room to grasp concepts you're not already familiar with.
    Yeah sorry you are right.I'm speaking in a scientific perspective if you are studying for example biology whereas like you described other degrees do work differently. I guess what I'm trying to say is as long as you are adaptive and persistent you can learn from the course
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    (Original post by LPauling)
    Got any tips on cramming?
    Ironically practice works best. You need to make your brain adapt so that it can more easily determine what content is relevant and also absorb information quickly. Try reading things more quickly than you usually do and only slow down for a moment if you don't understand something straight away. Also try prioritising practising skills over reading through notes to learn those same skills, e.g. read through the notes once then do past papers and refer to the notes whenever you get stuck rather than constantly reading through the notes.
 
 
 
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