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    I'm (hopefully) starting an Adult Nursing course this September, and I'll be living on campus. However, my total student loan (from the NHS Bursary and SLC) doesn't seem like enough to cover my accommodation, living costs and various other expenses.

    I know that I most likely won't be able to get a part-time job during the course because of the placements - I doubt any employer would allow me to work 8 weeks on and 8 weeks off.

    So nurses and nursing students... any tips???

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    (Original post by Crankyla)
    I'm (hopefully) starting an Adult Nursing course this September, and I'll be living on campus. However, my total student loan (from the NHS Bursary and SLC) doesn't seem like enough to cover my accommodation, living costs and various other expenses.

    I know that I most likely won't be able to get a part-time job during the course because of the placements - I doubt any employer would allow me to work 8 weeks on and 8 weeks off.

    So nurses and nursing students... any tips???

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    Once you've done a minimum of 12 weeks of placements you can apply to do bank work. Other than that get a job at the uni or the SU, they're nearly all 0hr contracts or if not fully flexible around studies.


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    (Original post by Crankyla)
    I'm (hopefully) starting an Adult Nursing course this September, and I'll be living on campus. However, my total student loan (from the NHS Bursary and SLC) doesn't seem like enough to cover my accommodation, living costs and various other expenses.

    I know that I most likely won't be able to get a part-time job during the course because of the placements - I doubt any employer would allow me to work 8 weeks on and 8 weeks off.

    So nurses and nursing students... any tips???

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    I've moved this to nursing and midwifery for you.

    A lot of students get work as bank HCAs or carers, you can pick shifts around your uni work and placement. Bar work can be quite flexible too. I did bar work until I got onto my trust bank when I was a student nurse.
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    (Original post by JP0506)
    Once you've done a minimum of 12 weeks of placements you can apply to do bank work. Other than that get a job at the uni or the SU, they're nearly all 0hr contracts or if not fully flexible around studies.


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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    I've moved this to nursing and midwifery for you.

    A lot of students get work as bank HCAs or carers, you can pick shifts around your uni work and placement. Bar work can be quite flexible too. I did bar work until I got onto my trust bank when I was a student nurse.
    Thank you so much; that makes me feel a lot better!
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    (Original post by Crankyla)
    I'm (hopefully) starting an Adult Nursing course this September, and I'll be living on campus. However, my total student loan (from the NHS Bursary and SLC) doesn't seem like enough to cover my accommodation, living costs and various other expenses.

    I know that I most likely won't be able to get a part-time job during the course because of the placements - I doubt any employer would allow me to work 8 weeks on and 8 weeks off.

    So nurses and nursing students... any tips???

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    *

    There are quite a few options as listed above and obviously more if you have a lot of experience or particular skills in an area. Zero hours contracts are not difficult to find, whether that is in bars, clubs, cafes and so on.

    I would recommend aiming for a carer or HCA role if you can as this is valuable experience while you're starting out. The more popular companies will usually want a fair bit of experience but some of the smaller ones will let you start straight away, as long as you have completed your moving and handling etc.
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    (Original post by Crankyla)
    I'm (hopefully) starting an Adult Nursing course this September, and I'll be living on campus. However, my total student loan (from the NHS Bursary and SLC) doesn't seem like enough to cover my accommodation, living costs and various other expenses.

    I know that I most likely won't be able to get a part-time job during the course because of the placements - I doubt any employer would allow me to work 8 weeks on and 8 weeks off.

    So nurses and nursing students... any tips???

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    I worked for the widening participation department of my university. I went round local schools and colleges delivering sessions/workshops about how to get into a nursing degree and what it was really like to be a student nurse. I gave personal statement, interview and maths/English test advice, answered questions and took in clinical bits & bobs for them to look at. I also got to help on a 3 day residential summer school. It was a 0 hour contract, I got about £7.90 an hour plus travel reimbursed and the department were very flexible around my placements. Once they got to know me they let me work very independently. Best job as as student I could have had. It was very refreshing to speak to students really eager to learn about nursing and nice to do something related to nursing that wasn't hands-on care. It also made me realise that I love teaching/educating and has made me strongly consider this in future. Look into if your university does this sort of thing!
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    I've moved this to nursing and midwifery for you.

    A lot of students get work as bank HCAs or carers, you can pick shifts around your uni work and placement. Bar work can be quite flexible too. I did bar work until I got onto my trust bank when I was a student nurse.
    And here I were thinking that working on top of work as a nurse was just more added stress!
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    (Original post by The_Internet)
    And here I were thinking that working on top of work as a nurse was just more added stress!
    It is. But when student nurses have no money for food, bills or to travel to their placements (Which are compulsory in order to qualify) many have no choice but to cram extra hours into their already busy schedule.
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    It is. But when student nurses have no money for food, bills or to travel to their placements (Which are compulsory in order to qualify) many have no choice but to cram extra hours into their already busy schedule.
    Fair enough. In a sense, I'm glad I did my uni course, in a small town in the midlands (which also does nursing), because well the cost of living isn't as bad. I don't think many students HAD to work at that place, like they do at many other unis, because a) most people there got the full tuition loan b) The cost of living was far cheaper than most other places
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    (Original post by The_Internet)
    Fair enough. In a sense, I'm glad I did my uni course, in a small town in the midlands (which also does nursing), because well the cost of living isn't as bad. I don't think many students HAD to work at that place, like they do at many other unis, because a) most people there got the full tuition loan b) The cost of living was far cheaper than most other places
    Seems like you had a good time of it.

    The issue student nurses have isn't necessarily the cost of living. It's the opportunity (Or lack of) to work alongside the course, which the government have failed to recognise. When you've already worked 3 x 12.5 shifts in a week, plus done work at home on a university assessment the last thing they want to be doing is working extra hours. When the university contact time for other students is, say, 10-20 hours per week this leaves 17.5 - 27.5 hours to work a PT job and study. Student nurses/AHPs just don't get this.

    The other issue they have is extra course costs not incurred by *some* other students. Travel costs to placement are reimbursed but you still have to have the capital to spend initially. Travel costs for one placement can easily go to £200-300. Then there's buying suitable shoes (Easily £40-50) and fob watches etc. It mounts up.
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    (Original post by The_Internet)
    And here I were thinking that working on top of work as a nurse was just more added stress!
    Unis advise you not to work along side but it's just not feasible. I have 2 children a car and a house....my bursery isn't much more than my car insurance. It's just not possible. Buts hey ho it's 3 years....6 months has already passed in a flash


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    Hi, not sure how relevant this is to thread but it is about studying nursing and money! Was wondering how much extra expenses there are specifically for the course outside of normal living expenses, for example books/uniform etc, thanks!
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    (Original post by Alice63)
    Hi, not sure how relevant this is to thread but it is about studying nursing and money! Was wondering how much extra expenses there are specifically for the course outside of normal living expenses, for example books/uniform etc, thanks!
    Perfectly valid question!

    Books: It's up to you how much you spend. I never found nursing text books to be extortionate in price, but university libraries stock pretty much all the key books you will need. Use the library to test drive books and only a few that you find most helpful, if you have the money to do so. I probably have approx £150 worth of books but this was out of choice not necessity.

    Uniforms: Are provided by your university, and the only cost you may incur is if you have to replace them. You will however need black socks and/or tights. If your university tunics are white you may want a little top for underneath as I found my white tunics to be a bit see-through.

    Shoes: Need to be closed-toe, black leather and extremely comfy! Clarks Unloops are popular with the girls. I currently wear a pair of black leather New Balance 624V4 (I'm a guy, for the record). Expect to spend about £50 on a pair of shoes. Don't go cheap and nasty or else your feet will hurt after a long shift.

    For stuff like fob watches, a pair of scissors and a lanyard (If you want one), I'd budget about £10. There are more expensive fob watches around, but a cheap one will get you through your degree if money is tight.

    Travel can really vary depending on the placement you have. How the funding of travel costs will work I am not sure as all the financial stuff for nursing degrees from Sept '17 and beyond has yet to be properly clarified.

    Hope that helps a bit! Hope I haven't missed anything!
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Perfectly valid question!

    Books: It's up to you how much you spend. I never found nursing text books to be extortionate in price, but university libraries stock pretty much all the key books you will need. Use the library to test drive books and only a few that you find most helpful, if you have the money to do so. I probably have approx £150 worth of books but this was out of choice not necessity.

    Uniforms: Are provided by your university, and the only cost you may incur is if you have to replace them. You will however need black socks and/or tights. If your university tunics are white you may want a little top for underneath as I found my white tunics to be a bit see-through.

    Shoes: Need to be closed-toe, black leather and extremely comfy! Clarks Unloops are popular with the girls. I currently wear a pair of black leather New Balance 624V4 (I'm a guy, for the record). Expect to spend about £50 on a pair of shoes. Don't go cheap and nasty or else your feet will hurt after a long shift.

    For stuff like fob watches, a pair of scissors and a lanyard (If you want one), I'd budget about £10. There are more expensive fob watches around, but a cheap one will get you through your degree if money is tight.

    Travel can really vary depending on the placement you have. How the funding of travel costs will work I am not sure as all the financial stuff for nursing degrees from Sept '17 and beyond has yet to be properly clarified.

    Hope that helps a bit! Hope I haven't missed anything!
    Thank you! This is really helpful, not a question you think to ask at open days but becomes quite important when trying to budget!
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    Perfectly valid question!

    Books: It's up to you how much you spend. I never found nursing text books to be extortionate in price, but university libraries stock pretty much all the key books you will need. Use the library to test drive books and only a few that you find most helpful, if you have the money to do so. I probably have approx £150 worth of books but this was out of choice not necessity.

    Uniforms: Are provided by your university, and the only cost you may incur is if you have to replace them. You will however need black socks and/or tights. If your university tunics are white you may want a little top for underneath as I found my white tunics to be a bit see-through.

    Shoes: Need to be closed-toe, black leather and extremely comfy! Clarks Unloops are popular with the girls. I currently wear a pair of black leather New Balance 624V4 (I'm a guy, for the record). Expect to spend about £50 on a pair of shoes. Don't go cheap and nasty or else your feet will hurt after a long shift.

    For stuff like fob watches, a pair of scissors and a lanyard (If you want one), I'd budget about £10. There are more expensive fob watches around, but a cheap one will get you through your degree if money is tight.

    Travel can really vary depending on the placement you have. How the funding of travel costs will work I am not sure as all the financial stuff for nursing degrees from Sept '17 and beyond has yet to be properly clarified.

    Hope that helps a bit! Hope I haven't missed anything!
    Hey, I was just wondering how your trust are about you wearing new balance? I'm a guy too and have been really struggling to find decent comfy leather shoes. Are they bothered that they're so obviously branded/technically trainers - I start as a HCA very soon but haven't been given a dress code beyond my uniform, I assume it will be as you say closed-toe black leather, but I'm on a super tight budget and don't want to waste money if they might cause a problem. I was also debating Clarks - but they're so expensive!


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    (Original post by JP0506)
    Hey, I was just wondering how your trust are about you wearing new balance? I'm a guy too and have been really struggling to find decent comfy leather shoes. Are they bothered that they're so obviously branded/technically trainers - I start as a HCA very soon but haven't been given a dress code beyond my uniform, I assume it will be as you say closed-toe black leather, but I'm on a super tight budget and don't want to waste money if they might cause a problem. I was also debating Clarks - but they're so expensive!


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Hi,

    My line manager has seen them in passing and hasn't said anything to me. They are technically trainers but don't look so because of the black leather - and the branding is black too so not obvious.

    I wore Clarks during my training and they were great - go with the 'school boy' style range if your feet are small enough (I think the largest they do is a size 10). These look smart and are comfortable. New Balance were only slightly cheaper. I only bought them as they are more breathable and good for running in - my ward is divided in two halves and has a large square footage, so you can end up running over 100m in response to an arrest. The other nurses on my ward also wear similar so I was fairly confident it wouldn't be an issue.

    If you wanna play safe go with Clarks I would!
 
 
 
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