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    I am a would be mature student with a BSc already from a brick university but considering starting to work towards a degree in Physics. At the moment only distance learning is available to me. I've looked at the open university options but not sure whether to start working towards to a Life Sciences degree or whether to use this time to prep myself for application to a brick university. I honestly don't know if a physics degree is feasible or sensible. Originally I was looking at courses to help me re enter the job market (currently a stay at home mum). At present I don't have the entry requirements for a Physics degree at a brick uni. Would doing OU modules now in Maths and or Physics be any help? Should I do a distance Maths A level instead?And has anyone started a degree with OU then transferred to a brick uni? is that an option? the lack of pratical lab work concerns me. current qualifications (from a long time ago) include a BSc in Engineering Product Design 92:1) and A levels in Physics, Biology and Art (CCC). I haven't studied in ten years
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    (Original post by Lake342)
    I am a would be mature student with a BSc already from a brick university but considering starting to work towards a degree in Physics. At the moment only distance learning is available to me. I've looked at the open university options but not sure whether to start working towards to a Life Sciences degree or whether to use this time to prep myself for application to a brick university. I honestly don't know if a physics degree is feasible or sensible. Originally I was looking at courses to help me re enter the job market (currently a stay at home mum). At present I don't have the entry requirements for a Physics degree at a brick uni. Would doing OU modules now in Maths and or Physics be any help? Should I do a distance Maths A level instead?And has anyone started a degree with OU then transferred to a brick uni? is that an option? the lack of pratical lab work concerns me. current qualifications (from a long time ago) include a BSc in Engineering Product Design 92:1) and A levels in Physics, Biology and Art (CCC). I haven't studied in ten years
    Your exiting qualifications might be enough to get you onto a physics degree, even if they are old. Contact admissions tutors and ask.

    At the moment, if you have already have a degree then you can't get a student loan to pay for a second degree. From next year student loans will be available to second degree students who are studying a science, technology, engineering or maths part-time. For that reason I think you should wait. If you can find a brick university near you that offers a part-time Physics degree then great, but if you can't then the OU might be your only option.

    There are two ways to use the OU as a route into a brick university:

    Using OU modules as an A level substitute

    You can use OU modules in lieu of A levels to gain entry into a brick university. Even if universities don't list OU credits as an acceptable qualification on their website, it is still worth emailing them to ask - a lot of places do accept them, although the exact number of credits you need varies. I needed 120 at level 1, but I know someone who only needed 60. This method is expensive though, personally I think the Access to HE course is the best option for mature students who want to return to university, you can find more information about them here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=3401311

    Transferring into the second year of a brick university degree

    A lot of universities don't accept transfers, but even those that do will almost certainly not accept an OU student unless they have completed 120 OU credits at level 1, and at least 60 OU credits at level 2. It would be a good idea to email universities you're interested in and ask whether they accept transfer students, and what OU modules they would recommend you do. The OU has a scheme called OpenPlus which makes the transfer process easier, here is a list of universities that take part: http://www.open.ac.uk/choose/openplu...rees-available
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    I am about to go into third year of a physics degree, having completed an Access to HE course (engineering pathway). Your existing A levels wont get you in as you don't have maths, which is essential. As Snufkin suggested, you should contact admissions tutors for advice about what you need to do. I think maths A level (either self-taught or evening classes at college) might be enough, but admissions tutors might want a more recent physics qualification too. An Access course will get you into some universities if it has enough level 3 maths content, but is not universally accepted for physics.
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    I've just finished my first year with The Open University on a Computing and IT degree, while it was good and I learned a lot, I decided to apply for a second year entry into a brick university as juggling a full-time job and 35 hours a week studying was intense to say the least, unfortunately there was too big a gap in the first year at TOU and brick universities in what I learnt, add to the fact Computer Science only really starts in year 2 with TOU as its more specialised than Computing and IT, so after the first year I've decided to go first year in a brick uni.

    There is a few positives to this though, I got provided with an exit qualification (CertHE in Computing and IT) which will help me find a more suitable part-time position thats relevant to my studies, also I did terrible on my GCSE's due to my lack of interest when I took them over 14 years ago and also didn't do any A-levels, but because I did so well in my first year at TOU I managed to get into a very good Computer Science programme for my educational history (typical entry req is 300 UCAS points).

    Financing will be a problem for you though, regardless of whether you go the distance learning, full-time or part-time route, you won't be entitled to any funding for a degree level tuition fee loan due to already holding one....
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    This is really useful information, thank you. I'm not expecting financing. The only reason, sadly, that this is a possibilityis due to the death of my mother. It's also the reason I'm considering it.
    I've contacted a couple of unis. One has been very helpful and after asking about my experience of Maths, said i could gain direct entry due to the maths content of my BSc. Butnif i wanted to study, a level maths would be best.

    I need to study maths before applying to ref refresh my memory but no local colleges offer a levels any more and the distance options have bad press. I nerd a maths a level over 2 years i can fit round childcare
    . I've got a baby and an autistic 4 year old
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    I don't think there's much value in distance learning for A level maths, to be honest. The materials they send you are generally inferior versions of the text books that you can buy quite cheaply on ebay, etc. With a decent text book or two, and all the resources on the internet, you may as well self-teach, and take the exams as a private candidate at an exam centre (or local college if you can find one that is willing).

    I know it's tough with the kids (I also have two, one of whom is severely autistic, though they're both grown up now). Parenting autistic children can be a very isolating experience, so going to university would probably be a very good thing for you, despite the additional stress. If you don't already have respite care, it's something worth pursuing with your social worker. I know I would really struggle with the workload without it.
 
 
 
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