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    I've just finished year 12 and will be applying for a Economics in the early stages of year 13 at a Russell Group university. Over the summer, I want to have read three useful books that I can mention in my personal statement. I have ten books in my mind, and I was wondering which three you would recommend as the ones I should be reading. In no particular order they are:

    The Return of Depression Economics by Paul Krugman
    Crisis Economics by Noriel Roubini
    Globalisation and Its Discontents by Joseph Stiglitz
    Making Globalisation Work by Joseph Stiglitz
    The Wealth and Poverty of Nations by David Landes
    Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman
    Road to Serfdom by Friedrich von Hayek
    General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money by John Maynard Keynes
    The Truth about Markets by John Kay
    Reinvented the Bazaar by John McMillan

    Perhaps it may be worth buying/renting four and eliminating one once I have read a few chapters of them all, so don't be afraid to recommend four. I really want to make my application stand out so I want to avoid the 'popular' ones like Freakonomics, Armchair Economist, Undercover Economist etc. The five universities I am most likely to apply for are Warwick, Nottingham, York, Leeds and Sheffield, if that helps.

    At the moment I am currently leaning towards Capitalism and Freedom, The Truth about Markets, The Return of Depression Economics and Globalisation and Its Discontents, but I'm not 100% certain on those which is why I am asking about them and other options.

    Many thanks in advance if you can help!
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    road to serfdom/capitalism and freedom
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    If you go too advanced, you could end up looking silly, or just really really pretentious. I think purely historical might be the best. Keynes, Friedman and probably Marx. Leave it at that.
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    (Original post by sleepysnooze)
    road to serfdom/capitalism and freedom
    (Original post by Trinculo)
    If you go too advanced, you could end up looking silly, or just really really pretentious. I think purely historical might be the best. Keynes, Friedman and probably Marx. Leave it at that.
    Thanks for the replies. I was thinking about perhaps just having one historical/theory book (ie. Friedman, Keynes and Hayek) and the other two being more modern/practical books (if that makes sense). Would having more than one of Friedman/Hayek/Keynes' books perhaps limit the breadth of books on my PS?
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    (Original post by joddcfc)
    Thanks for the replies. I was thinking about perhaps just having one historical/theory book (ie. Friedman, Keynes and Hayek) and the other two being more modern/practical books (if that makes sense). Would having more than one of Friedman/Hayek/Keynes' books perhaps limit the breadth of books on my PS?
    If you're asking for my own opinion - I think the gain in all this will be extremely marginal. The position is that you're looking to invest a couple of hundred hours looking for a few books to read to translate into an intangible benefit on your PS. At absolute most, you'll get maybe two sentences out of this.

    You're the econ student - tell me - where's the utility? What's the trade-off? 200 hours is no mean investment. What will really get you into your first choice university is more UCAS points, and I think that can be done by spending your time on directly congruent tasks. Maybe read a few essays and articles to get an idea of what they were on about. Maybe a bit of philosophy.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    If you're asking for my own opinion - I think the gain in all this will be extremely marginal. The position is that you're looking to invest a couple of hundred hours looking for a few books to read to translate into an intangible benefit on your PS. At absolute most, you'll get maybe two sentences out of this.

    You're the econ student - tell me - where's the utility? What's the trade-off? 200 hours is no mean investment. What will really get you into your first choice university is more UCAS points, and I think that can be done by spending your time on directly congruent tasks. Maybe read a few essays and articles to get an idea of what they were on about. Maybe a bit of philosophy.
    That's fair enough, thanks. I've been to my local library and have taken out Return of Depression Economics, Truth about Markets, Capitalism + Freedom, and the Road to Serfdom. I'm already 40 pages in to the first one and I'm enjoying it so am definitely progressing with that one, leaving me with 2 of the remaining 3 to read. I'm guessing you would want me to go with C+F and RTS. Certainly wouldn't mind reading those, however would admin officers prefer two books that don't both tend to go along pro-free market ideas? Or am I thinking too hard/complicated about it?

    Anyone else got an opinion on which two I should choose?
 
 
 
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