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    I'm going into year 13 and I'm still very confused as to whether I should apply to medicine or engineering. I'd say I've done more towards medicine, like work experience and courses but I haven't done much for engineering, however it struck me a few weeks ago that I really enjoy physics and maths and I'm really quite into things like mechanics and how things work. I feel like I want to have an impact on technology, but I've done all my work for applying to medicine and I feel like I won't be good enough to apply to engineering. I like the idea of medicine but recently I've found a lot of negatives with it too, however I've been unable to properly find out much about engineering. I'd prefer to just apply to medicine now and forget about engineering because I'm gonna have to do so much more for it like STEP and the PAT, since I don't do further maths. However obviously don't want to rush and pick something I won't enjoy just because I didn't want to put in the work (I'm making applications in October). I'd just like some opinions, how difficult is engineering, is it more or less conceptually difficult than medicine, is it more independent or more team based, do you get the chance to have an impact, how mathematically demanding is it, why you chose it, and from the information I've shared what do you think I should apply to?
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    Both are hard, choose the one you enjoy the most
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    (Original post by Eternalflames)
    Both are hard, choose the one you enjoy the most
    I'd say I'd be happy doing either because I enjoy bio, chem, physics and maths. However I just don't know what both courses are really like...
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    (Original post by Uni12345678)
    I'd say I'd be happy doing either because I enjoy bio, chem, physics and maths. However I just don't know what both courses are really like...
    Try asking in the current medical students forum about how they are finding it.

    Just my opinion but I'd say Engineering is conceptually harder due to the maths and physics element, whereas in Medicine there's lots and lots of more course material to cover.

    Elivercury, Smack maybe you guys can help out too?
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    (Original post by Uni12345678)
    I'm going into year 13 and I'm still very confused as to whether I should apply to medicine or engineering. I'd say I've done more towards medicine, like work experience and courses but I haven't done much for engineering, however it struck me a few weeks ago that I really enjoy physics and maths and I'm really quite into things like mechanics and how things work. I feel like I want to have an impact on technology, but I've done all my work for applying to medicine and I feel like I won't be good enough to apply to engineering. I like the idea of medicine but recently I've found a lot of negatives with it too, however I've been unable to properly find out much about engineering. I'd prefer to just apply to medicine now and forget about engineering because I'm gonna have to do so much more for it like STEP and the PAT, since I don't do further maths. However obviously don't want to rush and pick something I won't enjoy just because I didn't want to put in the work (I'm making applications in October). I'd just like some opinions, how difficult is engineering, is it more or less conceptually difficult than medicine, is it more independent or more team based, do you get the chance to have an impact, how mathematically demanding is it, why you chose it, and from the information I've shared what do you think I should apply to?
    If you have the required grades in appropriate subjects you will get offers for places to study engineering. STEP isn't required as it's a maths test (except for a few Cambridge colleges apparently) and PAT is for Oxford only, I think.

    There is a lot of information about engineering available, and you still have time to research and make the correct decision for you.

    To answer the question in your title, the best part of studying engineering is that it is a degree with generally good prospects, with some interesting elements and group projects, and the worst part is that it can be pretty full on at times, and if you're doing something broad like mechanical where there are a wide range of subjects, you'll probably come across one or more than you don't like (e.g. I don't like thermodynamics or controls).
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    (Original post by Uni12345678)
    I'd prefer to just apply to medicine now and forget about engineering because I'm gonna have to do so much more for it like STEP and the PAT, since I don't do further maths.
    You don't need STEP for engineering (unless you specifically apply to one of two colleges at Cambridge). And lacking FM would be a disadvantage at Cambridge anyway. Similarly PAT is only relevant if you apply to Oxford.

    But there's nothing to stop you applying to other universities without FM.
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    (Original post by Uni12345678)
    I'd just like some opinions, how difficult is engineering, is it more or less conceptually difficult than medicine, is it more independent or more team based, do you get the chance to have an impact, how mathematically demanding is it, why you chose it, and from the information I've shared what do you think I should apply to?
    Hi there,

    Medicine and Engineering are conceptually very different, so I wouldn't go about trying to determine which is easier/harder - there's just too many factors. That being said, I've got a lot of friends in Medicine, and a lot of their coursework is fairly scripted. After all, depending on the path you follow, you have to know certain things exactly so there's little to no problem solving (I'm aware this varies).

    For Engineering, it's all about problem solving, you get fixed fundamental theory, but what you can go into is incredibly broad. Engineering is no more difficult than other degrees, it may be more time consuming but as long as you're organized it's perfectly manageable. Typically, you'll have yearly group projects and occasionally you'll get small individual projects, or if it's your final year, a large individual project.

    You absolutely have a chance to make an impact, which is primarily why I love Engineering. Research, for me, is my favourite part. You get to tackle problems or investigate questions which are previously unanswered or uncertain, and it can be in so many different fields. For example, I'm currently working on rocket injector analysis techniques, and my current flatmate is using similar techniques but to identify cancer cells in blood.

    Hope this helps, and let me know if you have further questions!

    Scott
    Undergraduate Rep
    School of Engineering
 
 
 
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