Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Are there any first year English students out there who have just received their marks and found them totally weird? I did best in my worst paper and worst in my best!!!! My two surprises were Middle English and Special Author: Woolf. What did everyone else find to be the case?
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    This happens. The scaling heavily warps things. I scored equal in a paper I knew I'd missed bits on and a paper I couldn't see a reason for losing marks on.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    There was a 12 percentage points dfference between my best and worst exam... and there wasn't much difference between those exams I thought I had done reasonably well in and those that were very hard.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by SsEe)
    This happens. The scaling heavily warps things. I scored equal in a paper I knew I'd missed bits on and a paper I couldn't see a reason for losing marks on.
    How does the scaling work exactly?
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    I think it goes along the lines of:

    The Examiners have approximate parameters as to how many people should be awarded a certain class. They know what 'processed' marks are needed in order to obtain these classes. They therefore scale i.e. multiply or divide all the marks by some number, dependent on the general quality of marks for that paper that year, in order to get the right number of people into their bands.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I blame the shoddiness of Oxford's English department. I just finished my MSt there, so a bit different, but the first paper I wrote for them I thought was complete **** and deserved to fail. My dissertation, on the other hand, I thought was good and perfectly publishable. Both got the same mark. My highest mark was a mediocre essay based purely on bibliographical sources.

    A note about Oxford's English department: plodding, philological essays get top marks; real critical originality and daring gets a grudging low first or 2:1. The English department is generally scared of intellectual pyrotechnics - they reserve that for the All Souls prize fellowship.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I know exactly what you mean. My Old English result was a strong first and then my best paper (Victorian) was a low 2:1.

    Yet another Oxford quirk

    It's craziness!!!
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Its not suprising. Oxford, from my limited perspective, don't understand how to teach for exams.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by cor)
    Its not suprising. Oxford, from my limited perspective, don't understand how to teach for exams.
    A tutor would tell you you're their to learn for learning's sake, or some such comment. My tutor always tells us we have to work out for ourselves how to answer exam questions.

    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Yes, I believe that the Oxford philosophy is that life and the real world isn't an exam. It's actually one of the things I like about Oxford, I think it's good preparation - even though it's pure hell half the time.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Athena)


    A tutor would tell you you're their to learn for learning's sake, or some such comment. My tutor always tells us we have to work out for ourselves how to answer exam questions.

    Thats largely because tutors are oblivious to the real world. Plenty of people who get 2:1's have the knowledge and the ablity to get a first. The skills in Oxford are learnt by working out your opinions on the topic, coming to a firm conclusion and such.

    Exam technique and 'how to make a good 2:1 into a 1st' skills are just not taught. Its not that the students dont have the knowledge nor sufficient depth of opinion but are unable to express it always in a '1st class way' and there is pretty much no guidance on how to push the knowledge/skills you already have into the first category.

    I also find it deeply ironic that tutors use comments like 'prep for the real world' given colleges desires that academic comes first - which given the job market, extra-circus and skills should have far higher precedent as long as you can scrape a 2:1.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    What I find ironic is that for my Virginia Woolf paper I had a tutor who claimed to be teaching me how to write first class essays - she changed my whole writing style, telling me that's what I needed to get a first and I got a 2:2 on that paper!!!
 
 
 
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.