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    I won a best poster prize for some work presented at an international conference. I have evidence of the work being presented and even a cut of the prize money but
    1. I wasn't there personally
    2. nor was I first author but I designed the poster and did the experiment - feel that was a little unfair)
    3. We didn't get a certificate of the prize.

    I have a couple of questions - will this work for evidence/points at ST training level as a prize? I don't think it's any good for F1? Also, will the word/copy of an email from my supervisor congratulating us be sufficient portfolio evidence for having won the prize?

    Thanks
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    I don't see why you shouldn't claim a prize that was awarded to a group of individuals. Nobel Prize winners are still described as such when the prize is shared (as it often is) in any given year for the same series of discoveries.

    Perhaps an exception to this might be if there was a prize certificate that only named the first/presenting author? If it was a prize for the team (somewhat strengthened by the group email and share of the prize money) then I would save the evidence and include it as appropriate.*It would probably be correct to list the prize on a CV or job application followed by the word "shared" in parentheses to avoid any doubt.*
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    It's probably a bit disingenuous for you to list this as a poster prize and if it's mentioned at any point at interview it'll very quickly unravel that it's not truly a poster prize in the true spirit of the term. My two cents.

    - You were not the presenting author of the poster and you didn't attend the presentation as a co-author. Poster prizes are usually given for a good poster presentation (rather than commending wholly the actual scientific findings/content), that's what I would understand as a 'poster prize'.

    - You were not first author (even though you say it's unfair that you weren't). This paired with the fact you didn't present the poster means it's a bit dubious that you're the prize winner.

    I would include it alongside the description of the poster on your CV ("...this poster was awarded a poster prize..." but I wouldn't include it within the 'awards' section (or whatever). I think the true spirit of the scoring points on applications for a poster prize is that you've been personally given an award for a poster you've personally presented, rather than sharing a prize that was provided to somebody else for presenting a poster.

    This is a different opinion to MonteCristo though, obviously, and there's no clear cut rule about this (similar to the question "should I include a poster on my CV that I am co-author on but didn't present?" and different people have different opinions.
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    (Original post by Beska)
    I would include it alongside the description of the poster on your CV ("...this poster was awarded a poster prize..." but I wouldn't include it within the 'awards' section (or whatever).
    I have adopted this strategy as well when I was just a co-author on a presentation that won a prize, although, in those cases, the prize was clearly awarded to the first/presenting author. The OP's situation sounds a little different in that s/he made the poster and the team clearly intended to distribute the credit by sharing out the prize money.

    There are clearly different approaches here. I would consider asking your supervisor this question and/or state explicitly on any application the circumstances under which the prize was awarded, e.g. "I shared a monetary prize (the XXX Poster Prize) with XXX co-authors on XXX XXX 2016". If you don't have any other prizes, I would still consider including it in the "prizes" section of an application form - it's then up to the assessors whether or not they want to award points.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    I have adopted this strategy as well when I was just a co-author on a presentation that won a prize, although, in those cases, the prize was clearly awarded to the first/presenting author. The OP's situation sounds a little different in that s/he made the poster and the team clearly intended to distribute the credit by sharing out the prize money.

    There are clearly different approaches here. I would consider asking your supervisor this question and/or state explicitly on any application the circumstances under which the prize was awarded, e.g. "I shared a monetary prize (the XXX Poster Prize) with XXX co-authors on XXX XXX 2016". If you don't have any other prizes, I would still consider including it in the "prizes" section of an application form - it's then up to the assessors whether or not they want to award points.
    thanks for the input guys, the only reason I didn't present was the other author (a reg phD candidate) was already being funded to go to the conference so she used my poster and had to be first author as she was representing us. she had no input on the study I did but I used stored samples she had drawn for another study. i think that if someone questioned that I'd be happy to respond in that way.
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    (Original post by Joe_Bloggs93)
    thanks for the input guys, the only reason I didn't present was the other author (a reg phD candidate) was already being funded to go to the conference so she used my poster and had to be first author as she was representing us. she had no input on the study I did but I used stored samples she had drawn for another study. i think that if someone questioned that I'd be happy to respond in that way.
    I'd think twice about responding in exactly that way because this arrangement sounds pretty improper! I'd also be careful of "s/he won the prize but I did all the work so it was mine really" - a much safer argument would be that it was a group prize as shown by the fact that you designed the poster and the prize money was shared. You should also try to provide context on an application form so that the nature of the prize is clear to whoever is doing the scoring. One point at shortlisting isn't worth the risk of FtP issues for fiddling your CV.
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    Just to say to the OP and others to avoid getting in this situation again ... this is exactly what 'joint first authors' are for!

    Blogs JR*, Smith DW*, Parks N, et al.
    Bobbity boopity bop: a systematic review and database analysis.
    *Joint first authors.
 
 
 
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