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    Hi, I am recent graduate with a first-class honours in Economics from a low ranking university and mediocre A Levels. I haven't got any relevant work experience but will begin as a finance assistant shortly. I would like to get into Wealth Management / Risk Advisory but am unsure what is the best route. Due to my educational and professional history I am not expecting a top firm but would like to get into that field.

    My two options are:
    - MSc in Wealth Management / Risk Management etc at a decent uni
    - Professional exams (IMC / CFA / CISI)

    My dilemma is not only deciding between the two but what professional exams to take. I've seen IMC as a good introduction, but am not sure whether that's relevant. Any advice will help, thanks.
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    In your case, masters. To compensate for the low ranking uni.

    Imperial Biz school does a MSc in Wealth Management:


    http://wwwf.imperial.ac.uk/business-...th-management/
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    (Original post by MrTash)
    Hi, I am recent graduate with a first-class honours in Economics from a low ranking university and mediocre A Levels. I haven't got any relevant work experience but will begin as a finance assistant shortly. I would like to get into Wealth Management / Risk Advisory but am unsure what is the best route. Due to my educational and professional history I am not expecting a top firm but would like to get into that field.

    My two options are:
    - MSc in Wealth Management / Risk Management etc at a decent uni
    - Professional exams (IMC / CFA / CISI)

    My dilemma is not only deciding between the two but what professional exams to take. I've seen IMC as a good introduction, but am not sure whether that's relevant. Any advice will help, thanks.
    If you can afford it, I would really suggest doing both. I'm doing this at the moment - master's in the theory of my field, along with stuff like PRINCE2 and chartered management. Makes you really attractive to show you can do the theory side of things (which most master's degrees are) and the practical side too *
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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by MrTash)
    Hi, I am recent graduate with a first-class honours in Economics from a low ranking university and mediocre A Levels. I haven't got any relevant work experience but will begin as a finance assistant shortly. I would like to get into Wealth Management / Risk Advisory but am unsure what is the best route. Due to my educational and professional history I am not expecting a top firm but would like to get into that field.

    My two options are:
    - MSc in Wealth Management / Risk Management etc at a decent uni
    - Professional exams (IMC / CFA / CISI)

    My dilemma is not only deciding between the two but what professional exams to take. I've seen IMC as a good introduction, but am not sure whether that's relevant. Any advice will help, thanks.
    If you have the money, just get on a normal masters in finance programme.

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    (Original post by glebp)
    In your case, masters. To compensate for the low ranking uni.

    Imperial Biz school does a MSc in Wealth Management:


    http://wwwf.imperial.ac.uk/business-...th-management/
    I haven't got £30k so spend on a masters but can afford up to £15K maybe, Queen Mary offer MSc Wealth Management and Brunel offer MSc Banking and Finance. Are these courses worth applying for or as they're still not top unis should I just stick it at as a finance assistant for a while and keep trying to secure a position in a small firm?

    It should be notes ideally a London uni would be preferable as accommodation + living costs will drive up alternative options.
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    (Original post by MrTash)
    I haven't got £30k so spend on a masters but can afford up to £15K maybe, Queen Mary offer MSc Wealth Management and Brunel offer MSc Banking and Finance. Are these courses worth applying for or as they're still not top unis should I just stick it at as a finance assistant for a while and keep trying to secure a position in a small firm?

    It should be notes ideally a London uni would be preferable as accommodation + living costs will drive up alternative options.
    As you got a first class degree you may be eligible for scholarships at some universities, before committing to a cheaper masters I'd recommend that you first search for scholarships as they can bring the costs of 30k+ masters to ~15k+
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    (Original post by MrTash)
    I haven't got £30k so spend on a masters but can afford up to £15K maybe, Queen Mary offer MSc Wealth Management and Brunel offer MSc Banking and Finance. Are these courses worth applying for or as they're still not top unis should I just stick it at as a finance assistant for a while and keep trying to secure a position in a small firm?

    It should be notes ideally a London uni would be preferable as accommodation + living costs will drive up alternative options.

    You are opting for lesser things. Aim high and work hard. I suggest to apply to top schools (LSE, Imperial, Warwick). You would need to raise the funds, by taking out a loan most likely and then grinding hard to pay the fees and also sustain yourself. I would go though a year or two through hell, rather than impact my future prospects.

    Can't honestly stress this enough man, put in the hours to fund your studies, network your arse off. Took an example from my uncle who started washing dishes and now has an MBA from MBS and also an MSc in Physics.
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    It doesn't necessarily have to be Msc Finance at LSE.
    Attending a target University is what matters; but if you don't have the monetary funds then the CFA and a lot of networking is your next best shot.
    Don't do the IMC, it is too easy. Start off with CFA Level 1 and then do IMC Unit 2.
 
 
 
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