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    Hi all,

    Just finished my foundation year at uni so I'm going to progress onto the first year of my chosen degree course. Now, the plan was always chemical engineering as I enjoyed a-level maths and a lot of the quantitative aspects of a-level chemistry, but I'm quite concerned with the amount of practical work in the course and wonder if a more theoretical based course would suit me.

    Now, the foundation year allows me to progress onto any engineering, physics or maths course at uni. I've spotted a degree which is a combo of the core modules from the maths and physics degrees. I think I'd enjoy it but my concern is that, well, I don't really know what I want to do in terms of career after I graduate, and from what I've heard about engineering degrees is that they are broad and can set you up for pretty much any career as they are so well respected, and that if I were to choose this Maths/Physics degree, I will not have the same breadth of career options/prospects open as if I continued with chemical engineering. My parents also seem to think this and I'm not sure why.

    Anyway, I'd be really grateful if someone could shed some light on this issue for me please? Thanks!


    TL;DR - on track for an engineering degree cos of broad career prospects. Like the idea of doing a maths/physics degree, concerned that career prospects won't be as broad as if i did engineering. What to do?
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    Career prospects are similar in terms of broadness because with any degree you gain a load of transferable skills. You may want to think about what jobs you may want to get because an engineering degree may be a requirement for some of them. If you're still unsure then just pick what you enjoy. Career paths are diverse and you'll get where you want to in the end maybe with work experience and/or additional qualifications.
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    (Original post by alleycat393)
    Career prospects are similar in terms of broadness because with any degree you gain a load of transferable skills. You may want to think about what jobs you may want to get because an engineering degree may be a requirement for some of them. If you're still unsure then just pick what you enjoy. Career paths are diverse and you'll get where you want to in the end maybe with work experience and/or additional qualifications.
    Thanks, yeah that's just it though I really have no idea exactly what I want to do. I'm not sure if engineering is a career for me but like I said I'm trying to keep my options - I'm just unsure if the course would suit me.
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    My recommendation is decide on a vague career path first. Narrow it down to STEM/non-STEM, for example.

    Doing a subject like this will not necessarily make a non-STEM employer think any less of you, but you personally will find it harder to transfer to another role, and will have to make up some of the difference when preparing for interviews and jobs compared to, say an accounting/finance grad. You also need a good grade, because your selling point will be your analytical/problem solving ability, and you can't sell that with a weak grade.

    If you can't decide, look at the course lists and pick the one that looks most interesting to you. You'll do better at that one.
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    Doing a degree in Maths/Physics will himder your career prospects at all, and they are just as broad as engineering(or even broader in some cases).

    Since I can't paste link using TSR on my phone, I'd recommend you check the graduate destination data each uni publish (search for Sheffield as their data is presented more nicely).
 
 
 
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