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    Ok, so I will only have a degree in Computer Science after my final year - with no work experience at all.

    So far, the careers that have most interested me are web development and databases.

    Based on my research, web development is easy to get a job in, whereas database administration is harder.

    Although the subject suggests which career I should take out of the two mentioned, I want to eventually work in the databases field, but I currently have no experience.

    Should I start out by getting a job in web development, acquire experience and then work my way up to database administration, or is there a better approach to this?
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    Database admin is surely rather dull? Ensuring that the database is versioned correctly and that new fields introduced don't cause problems etc etc. It feels like a computer science light kind of job with no particular direction or end goal. I think the reason there aren't so many database admin jobs is because it isn't a job that is needed. The only time I have come across one was in the development of an enterprise system and their job was simply to coordinate the new tables and fields created by the developers and ensure everyone was working on the same version of a database. Not exactly riveting stuff.

    Good luck!
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Database admin is surely rather dull? Ensuring that the database is versioned correctly and that new fields introduced don't cause problems etc etc. It feels like a computer science light kind of job with no particular direction or end goal. I think the reason there aren't so many database admin jobs is because it isn't a job that is needed. The only time I have come across one was in the development of an enterprise system and their job was simply to coordinate the new tables and fields created by the developers and ensure everyone was working on the same version of a database. Not exactly riveting stuff.

    Good luck!
    Do you have any idea what's involved in a DBA role in the real working world? Based on this post, your knowledge appears limited to high school Microsoft Access... that or you just haven't been in enough companies or roles to realise yet, particularly if you've been going through small companies.

    Whether open source or not, take a look at enterprise level RDBMS, NoSQL, network architecture + configurations, backups and recoveries, scripting, load balancers, reverse proxies, reporting, SQL, transactions, BDRs, UNIX/Linux servers and data centres - that's just the tip of the iceberg. Doubt you've even seen a proper job spec for one before. There's quite a huge demand for skilled DBAs and a shortage of skills. You'll find that most roles overlap these days across many disciplines.

    Let's not spread false info on technical roles in this section... you're in for a shock if you decide on any of these careers.

    (Original post by KaMingy)
    Ok, so I will only have a degree in Computer Science after my final year - with no work experience at all.

    So far, the careers that have most interested me are web development and databases.

    Based on my research, web development is easy to get a job in, whereas database administration is harder.

    Although the subject suggests which career I should take out of the two mentioned, I want to eventually work in the databases field, but I currently have no experience.

    Should I start out by getting a job in web development, acquire experience and then work my way up to database administration, or is there a better approach to this?
    I didn't have much work experience after uni either, but my first role was in back-end API development as a PHP web developer. You are incorrect if you think any specialist IT/technology role is 'easy' to get into these days. Many require at least some commercial experience, otherwise you'll need to rely on side projects, portfolios etc.

    Don't forget either that web development often involves working with databases, particularly if you're full-stack or backend. You'll be exposed to server-side languages, version control, web servers, databases (MySQL, PostgreSQL, MongoDB etc.), frameworks (Express, Laravel, Symfony, AngularJS, Node.js etc.) and various libraries. Again that's just touching the surface. It goes on into deployments, devops and touches upon many other areas.

    Once you've gained experience in that, you can direct your career path more towards the engineering side involving databases.

    There's many ways towards it, support & solutions, server administration, devops, web development etc. pick the one you've had most exposure to and feel more passionate about and then go on from there. A lot of roles will overlap to some degree and you can then specialise towards it. Look for trainee/junior roles.
 
 
 
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