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    Hi everyone,

    Basicallly I have a place confirmed for medicine despite marginally missing my offer for a graduate entry programme. I had been seriously ill during the time, so got a 2:2, 1% away from a 2:1, which was my offer. I was wondering how much this is going to hold me back in terms of applying for things in the future, i.e. competitive foundation programmes, specialties, maybe academic foundation programme? Also is there anything I can do to make up for it?

    thank you
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    It won't hold you back whatsoever. What's important is your medical degree. You're in so just be happy, enjoy your summer and get ready to work hard
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    That won't matter. What matters is how you perform in your medicine degree for rankings etc. Congratulations

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    ah that's very reassuring. Thank you everyone, I was just told by a few medic friends to not bother with academic foundation programme as the 2:2 will hold me back
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    ah that's very reassuring. Thank you everyone, I was just told by a few medic friends to not bother with academic foundation programme as the 2:2 will hold me back
    It's so easy to be rejected from medicine so clearly they saw potential in you. There are people with higher grades and all sorts who get rejected. Now that you're on the course, the only way is up

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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    ah that's very reassuring. Thank you everyone, I was just told by a few medic friends to not bother with academic foundation programme as the 2:2 will hold me back
    To be honest, a 2:2 will put you at a disadvantage when applying for an AFP - you'll be up against people with stronger bachelor's degrees and more than a handful of people with PhDs. There are points available for other things like publications etc, but I don't know how many and if it would offset the relative deficit of a 2:2.

    For general foundation programme applications though, I can't see it being an issue.
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    (Original post by Helenia)
    To be honest, a 2:2 will put you at a disadvantage when applying for an AFP - you'll be up against people with stronger bachelor's degrees and more than a handful of people with PhDs. There are points available for other things like publications etc, but I don't know how many and if it would offset the relative deficit of a 2:2.

    For general foundation programme applications though, I can't see it being an issue.
    thank you very much for the honesty. That's interesting to know, I just wanted to go into this degree with a realistic approach on my future. Thanks
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    I agree with Helenia that it's not likely to have much influence at all on a regular medical career - it's probably still true that the majority of doctors don't have a BSc. The 2.2 might cost a point on an application at some stage (e.g. compared to a 2.1 or first) but it's not likely to limit your options.

    It is more likely to matter if you want to pursue the clinical academic training pathway.*At the early stages (e.g. academic foundation programme), you can probably mitigate the disadvantage with the usual publications, presentations, prizes as the application process is very structured. The later stages (Academic Clinical Fellowship, PhD Fellowship) require a much greater investment in the individual and that's likely to prompt someone to wonder whether your 2.2 is an indicator of ability... I suppose the way to deal with that is to answer the objection before it is raised, e.g. high medical school grades, distinctions, academic prizes, etc. Once you're through the PhD and have a publication record, I'd be surprised if very much weight was given to your BSc grade.

    In summary, almost no disadvantage for a regular clinical career and a definite (but small window of) disadvantage for an academic career that could be mitigated by an otherwise stellar record.*
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    I agree with Helenia that it's not likely to have much influence at all on a regular medical career - it's probably still true that the majority of doctors don't have a BSc. The 2.2 might cost a point on an application at some stage (e.g. compared to a 2.1 or first) but it's not likely to limit your options.

    It is more likely to matter if you want to pursue the clinical academic training pathway.*At the early stages (e.g. academic foundation programme), you can probably mitigate the disadvantage with the usual publications, presentations, prizes as the application process is very structured. The later stages (Academic Clinical Fellowship, PhD Fellowship) require a much greater investment in the individual and that's likely to prompt someone to wonder whether your 2.2 is an indicator of ability... I suppose the way to deal with that is to answer the objection before it is raised, e.g. high medical school grades, distinctions, academic prizes, etc. Once you're through the PhD and have a publication record, I'd be surprised if very much weight was given to your BSc grade.

    In summary, almost no disadvantage for a regular clinical career and a definite (but small window of) disadvantage for an academic career that could be mitigated by an otherwise stellar record.*
    Do you think it may be offset by letters from doctors and a university transcript, showing I attained a first in all other exams and coursework? or will it just be the black and white degree result that will be looked at
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Do you think it may be offset by letters from doctors and a university transcript, showing I attained a first in all other exams and coursework? or will it just be the black and white degree result that will be looked at
    For a lot of applications it is just a black and white overall score, I'm afraid. It can't hurt you to get some kind of extenuating circumstances documented, but I don't know how much attention the computer-says-no bots running specialty applications would pay to it.
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    Just be happy you managed to get into GEM, I heard it's more competitive than the 5 yr undergrad entry one.
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    (Original post by eden3)
    Just be happy you managed to get into GEM, I heard it's more competitive than the 5 yr undergrad entry one.
    Hey, Yeah I'm eternally grateful for getting in, by I guess throughout the degree I'm not just gonna sit around being happy I am in, at some point I would be focussing on my future, and I'd just like to see what is realistically open to me
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Hey, Yeah I'm eternally grateful for getting in, by I guess throughout the degree I'm not just gonna sit around being happy I am in, at some point I would be focussing on my future, and I'd just like to see what is realistically open to me
    Yes of course I wasn't implying that or anything, I was just trying to be a bit optimistic haha. Sorry my advice sucked

    Just try your best throughout your med career and see what's open to you/what you want to specialise in Best of luck!
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    (Original post by eden3)
    Yes of course I wasn't implying that or anything, I was just trying to be a bit optimistic haha. Sorry my advice sucked

    Just try your best throughout your med career and see what's open to you/what you want to specialise in Best of luck!
    Thank you, sorry if my previous message was a bit too sassy haha, I am half asleep at the moment
 
 
 
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