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    Hiya there just wanted some advice going to start biology and chemistry A-level in september, because it has been 2 years since I have done my gcses
    I as thinking of going over the gcse revison guides to jog my memory or is
    the gcse material completey diffrent in this case is it a waste of time to spend.

    Thank You for reading any help is most appreciated.
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    I think it's a good idea. Although there is a lot of different material at A-level, some of it builds on gcse knowledge, especially in chemistry I find. So it would be good just to make sure you remember how to balance equations and stuff like that.
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    Yeah - get the fundamentals in place. As webbers said, this will be particularly useful in Chemistry.
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    :ditto:
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    While the A-Levels are harder and more in-depth, so it will seem as if certain things are not exactly as you thought they were in GCSE, you will be taught on the basis of what you have covered at GCSE, meaning the best you can do is know that perfectly.
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    i guess it wouldnt hurt, thing is a very very small percentage of the stuff i learnt in gcse was relevant for bio chem phy at alevel. Espesh chem lol.
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    Is there a good website that explains in depth about chemistry (equations) and biology gcse. Also which material is best to revise,more important then others which may not help as much.
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    Waste of time to be honest, you would be better off spending that time looking at the a-level material.
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    It can't hurt.
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    Get ahead of the game, start looking at A level material, if there are bits you don't grasp fully because your basic knowledge is lacking then step back to GCSE.

    The difference in difficulty is huge, so rather than going over what you needed to know two years ago, go over what you need to know next year.
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    I don't see the point in getting ahead. You'll cover A-level material in class. By all means read ahead once you're secure in your GCSE knowledge, but A-level builds on GCSE, so you really need to be sure of that first.
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    You might find a lot of it comes back pretty quickly - to see how true this is, try a few GCSE papers (like the past ones on the AQA website, for example) - if you find those fairly easy, then good - if not, you know what you need to remember. Looking over A-level stuff before you're happy with GCSE stuff is a bit like trying to run before you can walk. Admittedly, GCSE science to some extent is a lie, but its only really a lie in that its often a simplification of the truth. If you're happy with the simpler ideas, the more complex ideas will seem easier to grasp.
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    (Original post by generalebriety)
    I don't see the point in getting ahead. You'll cover A-level material in class. By all means read ahead once you're secure in your GCSE knowledge, but A-level builds on GCSE, so you really need to be sure of that first.
    thats a bit of a daft thing to say actually. Getting ahead is the best thing anyone can do.

    If you learnt it in your own time, when you go over it in class thats your first stage of revision. then you'll revise it again, and again near exams. By which time you'll have it solidly in your head. And also by learning stuff in your own time (and not just relying on learning it in class) you have more time to learn about stuff that might not be on the syllabus, if you wanted to.

    My response would be, to start reading through the A level books, and if you ever do come across something you dont really know. just look it up via other books/internet.
    I'm currently a mature student (well 21) so did my GCSE's about 5 years ago. When i started AS physics i couldn't remember anything from GCSE and it didn't effect me in the slightest. i'm doing really well. I think its the same with everything, the fact is GCSE is so basic it hardly enters into the A level syllabus.
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    But what if he can't remember the GCSE material...?
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    (Original post by RocketTown)
    If you learnt it in your own time, when you go over it in class thats your first stage of revision. then you'll revise it again, and again near exams. By which time you'll have it solidly in your head. And also by learning stuff in your own time (and not just relying on learning it in class) you have more time to learn about stuff that might not be on the syllabus, if you wanted to.
    [...]
    I think its the same with everything, the fact is GCSE is so basic it hardly enters into the A level syllabus.
    It's nothing to do with the GCSE syllabus. If you're completely out of touch with the feel of the subject altogether, then jumping into an A-level in it is completely unadvisable. Anyway, what's wrong with my suggestion? If he flicks through a GCSE book and finds he still knows it all then he's perfectly welcome to go ahead and learn all the A-level stuff. If he finds he doesn't know any of it, then it's a good idea to revise it.

    I did AS chemistry and found my GCSE experience with chemistry very helpful (particularly in the assessed practical, but also generally in understanding what the hell was going on), even if the knowledge was completely unapplicable to AS.
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    well first thing first im a she not a he lol.

    ill go ahead and look at the GCSE and A-level to compare and pick parts of each, u see my gcse I didnt pass at a high standard one reason may have been lack of consentration and just frankly not beeing bothered. This time around I am willing to work hard and achieve the best possible.

    Will see how it goes,will keep u posted.

    Thanks for the advice.
 
 
 

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