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    I've been in CBT for about two months; my GP referred me after I started having anxiety attacks at school. I have GAD and social anxiety, and in my sessions, we focused more on the social anxiety, as, at the time, I felt that that was worse and I know I've had it longer than the GAD. Up until about four months, the GAD wasn't that bad - I was handling it - but when I'm under a lot of stress, I start having anxiety attacks.

    I've had seven sessions so far, and my therapist told me that she's happy with the progress I've made. I am, too - last year, I couldn't even go to a party with my own family without feeling panicked. Last weekend, I went to a party with friends and actually enjoyed myself.

    In our last session, my therapist said that we should start thinking about finishing our sessions. We've moved the sessions to every two weeks now, instead of every week - again, because she thinks I'm doing really well. I knew beforehand that a standard course of CBT is around 12 sessions, so I knew it was coming. However, when I left, I was hit with such a wave of panic, fear and upset; I cried for almost two hours after I went to bed that night.

    I'm going away for university in September, and I was thinking, If I'm this upset already about ending therapy, how am I going to cope at university, when I'm away from home? I'm scared as well that I'm going to regress or something to how I was before I started CBT and I'll start having anxiety attacks again. Is it normal to feel this worried when ending therapy, or am I just a needy wimp??
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've been in CBT for about two months; my GP referred me after I started having anxiety attacks at school. I have GAD and social anxiety, and in my sessions, we focused more on the social anxiety, as, at the time, I felt that that was worse and I know I've had it longer than the GAD. Up until about four months, the GAD wasn't that bad - I was handling it - but when I'm under a lot of stress, I start having anxiety attacks.

    I've had seven sessions so far, and my therapist told me that she's happy with the progress I've made. I am, too - last year, I couldn't even go to a party with my own family without feeling panicked. Last weekend, I went to a party with friends and actually enjoyed myself.

    In our last session, my therapist said that we should start thinking about finishing our sessions. We've moved the sessions to every two weeks now, instead of every week - again, because she thinks I'm doing really well. I knew beforehand that a standard course of CBT is around 12 sessions, so I knew it was coming. However, when I left, I was hit with such a wave of panic, fear and upset; I cried for almost two hours after I went to bed that night.

    I'm going away for university in September, and I was thinking, If I'm this upset already about ending therapy, how am I going to cope at university, when I'm away from home? I'm scared as well that I'm going to regress or something to how I was before I started CBT and I'll start having anxiety attacks again. Is it normal to feel this worried when ending therapy, or am I just a needy wimp??
    Not a needy wimp at all - ending therapy is always hard

    My advice would be to tell your therapist how you are feeling and to be honest with her about your fears. When I was doing CBT in 2011, ending was a terrifying prospect. By telling my therapist how scared I was, it enabled her to ease me towards the inevitable end. We were able to talk about it and whilst it was still difficult, it was less difficult than it might have otherwise been

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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Not a needy wimp at all - ending therapy is always hard

    My advice would be to tell your therapist how you are feeling and to be honest with her about your fears. When I was doing CBT in 2011, ending was a terrifying prospect. By telling my therapist how scared I was, it enabled her to ease me towards the inevitable end. We were able to talk about it and whilst it was still difficult, it was less difficult than it might have otherwise been

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    How do I tell my therapist, though? I mean, what do I say to her? I'm worried that she's going to be disappointed or something because she thinks I'm doing so well. And my parents, too - they're happy that I'm getting my confidence back now, but if I tell them I'm worried about ending the sessions, I don't feel like they'll be sympathetic; they'll just say "Well, how are you going to cope at university, then?" If I feel like I can't even tell my own parents, how do I tell my therapist?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    How do I tell my therapist, though? I mean, what do I say to her? I'm worried that she's going to be disappointed or something because she thinks I'm doing so well. And my parents, too - they're happy that I'm getting my confidence back now, but if I tell them I'm worried about ending the sessions, I don't feel like they'll be sympathetic; they'll just say "Well, how are you going to cope at university, then?" If I feel like I can't even tell my own parents, how do I tell my therapist?
    It's a very natural fear and does not negate any progress made; nor does it automatically mean you'll struggle to cope at uni!

    All you need to say is that you are worried about how to keep up the good work achieved once therapy has ended, and does she have any suggestions?

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    I've just ended my CBT out of choice since I've had 14/15 sessions and I didn't like how the therapist pointed out that I was going over the number amount of sessions and not making enough improvement and she wasn't helpful. I'm glad you've found it useful tho and it has helped you improve, ending therapy must be scary as its helped you a lot so don't feel like you are a wimp maybe you could ask your therapist for any tips to help when you've ended your therapy
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I've been in CBT for about two months; my GP referred me after I started having anxiety attacks at school. I have GAD and social anxiety, and in my sessions, we focused more on the social anxiety, as, at the time, I felt that that was worse and I know I've had it longer than the GAD. Up until about four months, the GAD wasn't that bad - I was handling it - but when I'm under a lot of stress, I start having anxiety attacks.

    I've had seven sessions so far, and my therapist told me that she's happy with the progress I've made. I am, too - last year, I couldn't even go to a party with my own family without feeling panicked. Last weekend, I went to a party with friends and actually enjoyed myself.

    In our last session, my therapist said that we should start thinking about finishing our sessions. We've moved the sessions to every two weeks now, instead of every week - again, because she thinks I'm doing really well. I knew beforehand that a standard course of CBT is around 12 sessions, so I knew it was coming. However, when I left, I was hit with such a wave of panic, fear and upset; I cried for almost two hours after I went to bed that night.

    I'm going away for university in September, and I was thinking, If I'm this upset already about ending therapy, how am I going to cope at university, when I'm away from home? I'm scared as well that I'm going to regress or something to how I was before I started CBT and I'll start having anxiety attacks again. Is it normal to feel this worried when ending therapy, or am I just a needy wimp??
    Tell your therapist about this, right now I suspect it's the fear of the unknown as well after your therapy sessions as she won't be there to help you through it and talk you through it. But even when you've started uni or face any new situation, keep running through the techniques she has taught you. If you talk to her about this, she'll give you more advice and tips to implement which in the long term will help with your anxiety and will be life long coping strategies I hope. Do you have any family or close friends you can also talk to when you get these attacks?
 
 
 
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