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    Hi,

    I am currently appealing at my former institute of higher education. The University was made aware of my mitigating circumstances before my summer exams, but dismissed it on the grounds that no evidence was provided (stated in my results).

    I have now been formally analysed by my GP and he is about to write me a letter which I will pass on to the University next week.

    At any rate; I have a couple of questions...

    1. Can I appeal for my anxiety and OCD?

    2. What should my letter mention to make my appeal stronger?

    I would preferably not like to mention the OCD stuff. The OCD that I have is not normal, it is referred to as pure O which has and is bringing me a lot of distress. If I told anyone about the thoughts (sometimes) in my mind people would authentically think I am sick; hence the favoured silence.


    Thanks for all helpful replies in advance!
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    I'm sorry I'm not answering all your questions but I believe it would be beneficial if you DID mention your OCD as your university is more likely to take your circumstances into consideration rather than dismiss it. You don't need to inform any friends, just figures of authority.
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    (Original post by CounTolstoy)
    I'm sorry I'm not answering all your questions but I believe it would be beneficial if you DID mention your OCD as your university is more likely to take your circumstances into consideration rather than dismiss it. You don't need to inform any friends, just figures of authority.
    Thank you for the reply. I have not even mentioned these things to my GP. Honestly these are things you should not discuss in public...it's gruesome.

    Perhaps I will attach a personal letter to the GP letter; but I shall think about this decision over the weekend.
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    (Original post by ThinkAndGrowRich)
    Hi,

    I am currently appealing at my former institute of higher education. The University was made aware of my mitigating circumstances before my summer exams, but dismissed it on the grounds that no evidence was provided (stated in my results).

    I have now been formally analysed by my GP and he is about to write me a letter which I will pass on to the University next week.

    At any rate; I have a couple of questions...

    1. Can I appeal for my anxiety and OCD?

    2. What should my letter mention to make my appeal stronger?

    I would preferably not like to mention the OCD stuff. The OCD that I have is not normal, it is referred to as pure O which has and is bringing me a lot of distress. If I told anyone about the thoughts (sometimes) in my mind people would authentically think I am sick; hence the favoured silence.


    Thanks for all helpful replies in advance!
    No one can answer your first question, from the info given :nah: Each university (and sometimes within that, each department) has different rules about grounds for appeal. You would need to look up the specific regulations for your exact course :yes:

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    If your GP doesn't know about the OCD and you don't have a diagnosis from a medical or other professional then you wouldn't get supporting evidence to have that as part of the appeal. If you do have a diagnosis they don't have to give details of the specific compulsions just confirm the diagnosis and state the impact the condition would have on your studies.

    Not sure if a diagnosis of anxiety would be enough on its own as uni rules vary as to what they accept and anxiety covers a large range of difficulties from mild up to being completely crippling. Your doctor will be able to explain the impact though.

    You would ideally need to show why you didn't provide the evidence at the time of your claim. If your doctor can confirm a long standing diagnosis of anxiety which covers the time of the assessment it would help.
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    (Original post by magratgarlick)
    If your GP doesn't know about the OCD and you don't have a diagnosis from a medical or other professional then you wouldn't get supporting evidence to have that as part of the appeal. If you do have a diagnosis they don't have to give details of the specific compulsions just confirm the diagnosis and state the impact the condition would have on your studies.

    Not sure if a diagnosis of anxiety would be enough on its own as uni rules vary as to what they accept and anxiety covers a large range of difficulties from mild up to being completely crippling. Your doctor will be able to explain the impact though.

    You would ideally need to show why you didn't provide the evidence at the time of your claim. If your doctor can confirm a long standing diagnosis of anxiety which covers the time of the assessment it would help.
    Thanks a lot for the very comprehensive reply. The GP is aware about the OCD; however I didn't mention everything during my appoinments but as you have already stated it isn't required.
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    (Original post by ThinkAndGrowRich)
    Hi,

    I am currently appealing at my former institute of higher education. The University was made aware of my mitigating circumstances before my summer exams, but dismissed it on the grounds that no evidence was provided (stated in my results).

    I have now been formally analysed by my GP and he is about to write me a letter which I will pass on to the University next week.

    At any rate; I have a couple of questions...

    1. Can I appeal for my anxiety and OCD?

    2. What should my letter mention to make my appeal stronger?

    I would preferably not like to mention the OCD stuff. The OCD that I have is not normal, it is referred to as pure O which has and is bringing me a lot of distress. If I told anyone about the thoughts (sometimes) in my mind people would authentically think I am sick; hence the favoured silence.


    Thanks for all helpful replies in advance!
    I'm afraid you are playing with fire if you re-submit for an appeal when the University wants evidence, yet you refuse to disclose all the evidence to your GP. You cannot expect the University to consider 'stuff' if you haven't given independent corroboration of a genuine issue from your GP. In other words, what are you going to do if, having not fully disclosed to your GP, the University does not accept you have sufficient evidence and refuses your appeal? It is highly unlikely you would get another chance to appeal, but would you be content with the result, knowing you had more information you could have given, but chose not to?

    Universities can only give mitigation according to the facts before them. You have already found this out once, and now you are still with-holding potential evidence. Of course it is your right to do that, but consider the impact of a second decision there is insufficient evidence to award the mitigation you want.
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    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    I'm afraid you are playing with fire if you re-submit for an appeal when the University wants evidence, yet you refuse to disclose all the evidence to your GP. You cannot expect the University to consider 'stuff' if you haven't given independent corroboration of a genuine issue from your GP. In other words, what are you going to do if, having not fully disclosed to your GP, the University does not accept you have sufficient evidence and refuses your appeal? It is highly unlikely you would get another chance to appeal, but would you be content with the result, knowing you had more information you could have given, but chose not to?

    Universities can only give mitigation according to the facts before them. You have already found this out once, and now you are still with-holding potential evidence. Of course it is your right to do that, but consider the impact of a second decision there is insufficient evidence to award the mitigation you want.
    Above I have stated that I would consider this option, but you are right with this reply. I will disclose everything. Thank you.
 
 
 
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