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Why should any offensive words be illegal? watch

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    The process of being offended by words is this:

    (1) Person A says something offensive to Person B.
    (2) Person B goes through the short mental reaction of feeling aggrieved about those words: frustration, a sense of "how dare they", "what an a-hole".
    (3) Person B walks away from Person A (or blocks them if online) and moves on with their life. Any ill-feelings about what happened will have disappeared within at least a few days.

    How is it proportionate to spend thousands of pounds in police, court and lawyers' time to punish someone for the short mental reaction at (2)?

    If you believe some offensive words should be illegal - what is your justification with reference to the harm that you believe is caused?
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    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    The process of being offended by words is this:

    (1) Person A says something offensive to Person B.
    (2) Person B goes through the short mental reaction of feeling aggrieved about those words: frustration, a sense of "how dare they", "what an a-hole".
    (3) Person B walks away from Person A (or blocks them if online) and moves on with their life. Any ill-feelings about what happened will have disappeared within at least a few days.

    How is it proportionate to spend thousands of pounds in police, court and lawyers' time to punish someone for the short mental reaction at (2)?

    If you believe some offensive words should be illegal - what is your justification with reference to the harm that you believe is caused?
    I agree. Words are not the property of the law. They belong to people. I find it disusting that police time and court time has been taken up on the pursuit of prosecuting people for using words, however foul they might be. You don't like the words someone uses? Move on, or use better words to shut them down. It's up to you, but please, don't take the obsequious route of calling in the law because you aren't capable of regulating your own feelings about a subject.
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    never
    if you think about it, 'words' are mere vibrations of our vocal chords alongside tongue movements, which are given meanings by us as a human linguistic community, and then taken to be offensive by some in that community. they are mere concepts which have relative receptions. banning words is like banning sounds, or musical notes. it's ridiculous. if you get offended by something, which doesn't physically harm you, don't use means to block that word which *does* physically harm others (legal coercion). grow a pair, and evolve. if you require the government to protect you from hurt feelings, you're a child, and you don't deserve a government. you deserve a dictatorship.
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    Wish more people would have thicker skin. I mean I personally cannot be offended.
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    I apologize to the mods in advance for this, but i believe words should never be illegal.
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    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    The process of being offended by words is this:

    (1) Person A says something offensive to Person B.
    (2) Person B goes through the short mental reaction of feeling aggrieved about those words: frustration, a sense of "how dare they", "what an a-hole".
    (3) Person B walks away from Person A (or blocks them if online) and moves on with their life. Any ill-feelings about what happened will have disappeared within at least a few days.

    How is it proportionate to spend thousands of pounds in police, court and lawyers' time to punish someone for the short mental reaction at (2)?

    If you believe some offensive words should be illegal - what is your justification with reference to the harm that you believe is caused?
    There are no illegal words

    (Original post by AperfectBalance)
    Wish more people would have thicker skin. I mean I personally cannot be offended.
    I also wish people would have thicker skin but I also accept many people have had a much harder life than me so I try not to be a total c*nt all the time.
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    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    The process of being offended by words is this:

    (1) Person A says something offensive to Person B.
    (2) Person B goes through the short mental reaction of feeling aggrieved about those words: frustration, a sense of "how dare they", "what an a-hole".
    (3) Person B walks away from Person A (or blocks them if online) and moves on with their life. Any ill-feelings about what happened will have disappeared within at least a few days.

    How is it proportionate to spend thousands of pounds in police, court and lawyers' time to punish someone for the short mental reaction at (2)?

    If you believe some offensive words should be illegal - what is your justification with reference to the harm that you believe is caused?
    Tell us which words are illegal?

    Some words are offensive, but not illegal.

    If you use those words in order to offend someone else, then you may be guilty of a crime i.e incitement to racial hatred, but it depends on the context.

    Why do you think its healthy to go round insulting and provoking people?
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Tell us which words are illegal?

    Some words are offensive, but not illegal.

    If you use those words in order to offend someone else, then you may be guilty of a crime i.e incitement to racial hatred, but it depends on the context.

    Why do you think its healthy to go round insulting and provoking people?
    And who determines the context of what can and cannot be deemed 'offensive'? Moreover, you're assuming the OP stated it's 'healthy'. Let's stay on the topic.
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    Well for example take the word "******". It has undergone a huge change in the last 15 years or so, so long seen as taboo and prejudice but has undergone an amelioration of sorts in that it has been "reclaimed" by black people and is now used heavily in everyday language and culture. Modern music is peppered with it.
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    Okay this is probably the fourth time today I've brought linguistics onto forums with no connection to the subject but hey, ya gonna learn something new. The main principle behind the censoring of particular words - such as the n word - is that of political correctness. Everyone knows how exasperating it can be to have to be "politically correct", right? It's just social justice warriors with nothing better to do than make the world a "safe space" without "triggers", right?

    Wrong. There were, at one point, many linguistics and scientists who believed that the way we spoke influenced the way we thought, and therefore they too subscribed to the idea that censorship of language would result in politically correct thought. This is the principle of linguistic relativity or linguistic determinism. Now, let me preface this by saying that determinism in its strong form has been wholly discredited in a scientific sphere, but there is some evidence to suggest that the way we speak does have some influence over the way we think, but does not inhibit us or stop us thinking particular things. The principle behind political correctness is known as the Whorfian hypothesis, which was championed by a guy named Whorf who put forward the idea that the words we say and the language we use directly changes the way we see the world; that is, a Polish speaker and a German speaker would perceive things differently, and would think differently. The evidence he used to back up his claims was tenuous at best, and was totally academically destroyed 20 years on, but by then his theory had developed into something more moderate - linguistic relativity - which suggested that the way we speak has some effect on the way we think, but not much. There are actually examples of relativity having some real life applications: some experiments with colour have shown that people with different colour categories would draw different distinctions between colour boundaries, depending on the whether our language requires us to specify direction or manner we'll pay attention to different things, Piraha speakers have no words for numerical values and therefore suck at maths... there are examples of where our language is important in the way we conceptualise things.

    However, there is no evidence to suggest that erasing a word will erase a concept, which is the foundation of political correctness. Making words pertaining to hate speech illegal would not stop concepts of racism and sexism from existing, because if we solely thought and spoke in things we had names for, we'd never coin neologisms for new things, like being "hangry" or "on fleek". People believe that if we eradicate the language, we won't be able to express what we were previously articulating, but the concepts of love and hatred and anger and fear existed long before we had the words to describe them, and so did discrimination.

    The principle of censoring particular words and making them illegal was once theoretically sound, but to any cognitive scientist/linguist/person with common sense in the 21st Century, they'd think you were having a laugh.
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    No word should ever be illegal. Recently I got a TSR warning saying "some people might be vulnurable to those words"
    I am not joking by the way. This is real.

    Grow thicker skin, feelings are absolutely meaningless to free speech, which is why actual debate and conversation are actively choked down on TSR. They have a" feelings are more important than free speech" policy which they actively enforce.
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    (Original post by AperfectBalance)
    Wish more people would have thicker skin. I mean I personally cannot be offended.
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    (Original post by AperfectBalance)
    Wish more people would have thicker skin. I mean I personally cannot be offended.
    Unfortunately, not everyone is you.
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    Rampant political correctness has created a generation of easily-offended little babies. SJWs are relentless in their crusade against free speech. Controlling what words are socially-accepted has a profound impact on one's thoughts. George Orwell's 'thought police' is becoming truer by the day.
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    (Original post by PrincessBO$$)
    2deep5me
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    (Original post by Otaku98)
    Rampant political correctness has created a generation of easily-offended little babies. SJWs are relentless in their crusade against free speech. Controlling what words are socially-accepted has a profound impact on one's thoughts. George Orwell's 'thought police' is becoming truer by the day.
    Spot on

    (Original post by Danny the Geezer)
    Unfortunately, not everyone is you.
    Thats completely irrelevant. Feelings have no place when it comes to free speech. If people cant handle the result of this, then they might want to re-evaluate moving to a country that caters to the easily offended.

    (Original post by mercuryman)
    Is this thread some neo-nazi convention? Never seen so many in one thread
    Name a single neo-nazi in this thread and provide detailed evidence. Everything else would be character assassination and false allegations - which are illegal.
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    Have to say, if it is okay for the "victims" to use a word, it should be okay for the "perpetrators", too. Black rap artists throw that certain word around like it's nothing, so clearly they don't understand the history of the word or else do not find it embarrassing. It's not one rule for one and another rule for everyone else...

    On the other hand, I think it's morally wrong to use certain words repeatedly to make somebody feel bad about themselves - but the problem is the circumstance, not the word itself.
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    (Original post by 1010marina)
    Have to say, if it is okay for the "victims" to use a word, it should be okay for the "perpetrators", too. Black rap artists throw that certain word around like it's nothing, so clearly they don't understand the history of the word or else do not find it embarrassing. It's not one rule for one and another rule for everyone else...

    On the other hand, I think it's morally wrong to use certain words repeatedly to make somebody feel bad about themselves - but the problem is the circumstance, not the word itself.
    Nail, head.
 
 
 
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