Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Basically, I have aspergers, dyspraxia, CFS and a few other health problems am 22 years old and female. I have anxiety and depression too. At the moment I have a job working up to 30 hours a week... my family has a history of mental health problems, but I am feeling right now that my moods are more all over the place than usual, some days completely without warning my mood can go from really happy to feeling like ending it all to having loads of confidence to questioning ever decision I ever made... normally my anxiety meds help, but i feel like everything has gotten on top of me, and the progress I made socially has gone effectively out the window.. i hate talking to my gp.. and medical people in general.. as always feel like I am wasting their time.. but not sure how to approach the issue with them?
    • #2
    #2

    Bipolar disorder is not when you are happy and then sad in the space of a few hours. Those are mood swings, probably caused by your depression and anxiety.
    Bioplar disorder is extreme excitement and agigation and incoherent thinking for a longer period, at least 6 months, followed by a period of extreme depression for a similar time period.
    It's usually accompanied by psychosis.

    You don't have bipolar disorder, but I hope you get the help you need with your anxiety and depression.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Bipolar disorder is not when you are happy and then sad in the space of a few hours. Those are mood swings, probably caused by your depression and anxiety.
    Bioplar disorder is extreme excitement and agigation and incoherent thinking for a longer period, at least 6 months, followed by a period of extreme depression for a similar time period.
    It's usually accompanied by psychosis.

    You don't have bipolar disorder, but I hope you get the help you need with your anxiety and depression.
    Nah, that's not true at all. I mean the 'at least 6 months' bit. It doesn't need to be that long for them to label you bipolar. Speaking from experience as I was MISdiagnosed with it in the past. And anyway from what I was told there's also a rapid cycling type of bipolar, so the info you've provided is incorrect. Not saying the OP is bipolar though.
    • #2
    #2

    (Original post by Ciel.)
    Nah, that's not true at all. I mean the 'at least 6 months' bit. It doesn't need to be that long for them to label you bipolar. Speaking from experience as I was MISdiagnosed with it in the past. And anyway from what I was told there's also a rapid cycling type of bipolar, so the info you've provided is incorrect. Not saying the OP is bipolar though.
    Rapid cycling BP disorder occurs over a period of at least 4 or so days for each episode. Not hours as OP has stated. The six months for bipolar disorder is certainly true, and whilst a Dr might make a BP diagnosis for a slightly shorter period, the point still stands that it's over several months (ie longer term) and not hours, and thus, OP is definitely not BP. However, if they have concerns they should talk to a medical professional.
    Offline

    20
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Basically, I have aspergers, dyspraxia, CFS and a few other health problems am 22 years old and female. I have anxiety and depression too. At the moment I have a job working up to 30 hours a week... my family has a history of mental health problems, but I am feeling right now that my moods are more all over the place than usual, some days completely without warning my mood can go from really happy to feeling like ending it all to having loads of confidence to questioning ever decision I ever made... normally my anxiety meds help, but i feel like everything has gotten on top of me, and the progress I made socially has gone effectively out the window.. i hate talking to my gp.. and medical people in general.. as always feel like I am wasting their time.. but not sure how to approach the issue with them?
    AS and anxiety/depression can mimic bipolar disorder, you probably have nothing to worry about.

    Just try and keep going, go into your own bubble when you need to, and do what you can to remain lucid. You'll be alright :hugs:
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    If you're worried, speak to your GP. As Tootles mentioned, there is overlap.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Rapid cycling BP disorder occurs over a period of at least 4 or so days for each episode. Not hours as OP has stated. The six months for bipolar disorder is certainly true, and whilst a Dr might make a BP diagnosis for a slightly shorter period, the point still stands that it's over several months (ie longer term) and not hours, and thus, OP is definitely not BP. However, if they have concerns they should talk to a medical professional.
    I wasn't referring to the OP when I mentioned the rapid cycling. I was simply demonstrating how wrong your 6 months mark point is.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    X
    I think trying to give a diagnosis over a screen has the potential to be quite dangerous - especially when none of us are trained medical professionals.

    (Original post by Anonymous)
    X
    OP. Tootles and Tiger Rag have given the best advice - seeing your GP is a good idea. You wouldn't be wasting their time - you have just as much right to an appointment as anyone else and if they're a really good GP, they'll reassure you about this.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Deyesy)
    I think trying to give a diagnosis over a screen has the potential to be quite dangerous - especially when none of us are trained medical professionals. *



    OP. Tootles and Tiger Rag have given the best advice - seeing your GP is a good idea. You wouldn't be wasting their time - you have just as much right to an appointment as anyone else and if they're a really good GP, they'll reassure you about this.
    Eh? Are you referring to me or Anon 2? Because I wasn't diagnosing anyone. I simply stated that the info he provided was incorrect because there are different types of bipolar.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Rapid cycling BP disorder occurs over a period of at least 4 or so days for each episode. Not hours as OP has stated. The six months for bipolar disorder is certainly true, and whilst a Dr might make a BP diagnosis for a slightly shorter period, the point still stands that it's over several months (ie longer term) and not hours, and thus, OP is definitely not BP. However, if they have concerns they should talk to a medical professional.
    6 months is not stated anywhere in the DSM or ICD. Last time I checked, in the DSM it says a hypo manic period must be 4 days long, mania is 7 days and depression is 2 weeks. Hypo manic and manic periods may be shorter with treatment.

    Rapid cycling is defined in the DSM (again last time I checked) by at least 4 episodes a year. There are types of cycling called ultra rapid cycling and ultradian cycling which can be changes within a day. Although these are very rarely used (in the uk anyway).

    I would be careful to say that op is definitely not bipolar. I agree that it is unlikely, however only a doctor with all the facts can make a psychiatric diagnosis.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Ciel.)
    Eh? Are you referring to me or Anon 2? Because I wasn't diagnosing anyone. I simply stated that the info he provided was incorrect because there are different types of bipolar.
    Apologies! Editted my post
    • TSR Support Team
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Late reply but this can often happen with CFS. I think technically it's called boom and bust, I call it the 'hyper-dead' cycle though which gives an indication of how extreme they can be. It's generally one of my early warning signs to slow down or I'll relapse, it varies person to person though, and can be anything up to a few times an hour which is absolutely exhausting. The general trick for helping them is trying to not overdo it in the good parts though and try and keep everything as even as possible- if you're getting any treatment for CFS they'll have talked about pacing with you.

    From a mood point of view, I don't know about anyone else but mine doesn't always follow with the energy. If I'm hyper I can end up really unsafe as have motivation to do stuff, at the same time it can be amazing. If I'm dead my mood can sort of be okay, or not at all. It just depends. Talk through with your GP anyway, but it seems to me like CFS and the combination of depression/aspergers other people have said above might explain it for you


    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: August 11, 2016
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.