wimme
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Hi guys, I really love biology and so I want to focus my degree around that. Initially I thought of taking a biology degree, but I know that this degree isn't exactly the best one out there for employers.

Consequently, I decided to see if there were any other biology-related degrees that might make employers look more favourably upon me when it comes to looking for jobs. I was explaining this to my cousin (who has just done a degree at manchester uni in something ear-doctor related - sorry I can't remember the name, but now she's an audiologist/ordiologist??? Sorry I can't remember exactly what it's called), and she told me that medicine is very biology based, so why not apply for that?

Therefore, I began thinking about medicine, and thought of going to Birmingham university (which is local to me). However, a friend advised me not to apply to Bham Uni for medicine because they are GCSE heavy - for medicine - and so will prefer students with a high proportion of A*s-As, unlike my GCSEs: 2A*s, 6As and 3Bs.

This worried me a lot because I really want to go to Birmingham university. I was also thinking of applying to Manchester uni - which I don't mind much either.

I was telling my friends about my dilemma and they gave me advise on other biology related degrees I could do if I don't want to do medicine and this is where biomedical science emerged. I had never heard of it before and so I explored it when I got home. The topics involved in the courses were ones that I was interested in/didn't mind studying and there was a lot of practical work/laboratory work involved - which I think I prefer as I learn better from hands on stuff rather than just listening.

However, the careers that came from this degree were apparently things like research scientist and basically lab-type work and this didn't sound that exciting too me as it sounds like you're going to be stuck in a lab all day, doing the same repetitive tasks all over again the next day. So this slightly put me offf biomedical science.

Anyway, in my endless quest to find something to do with my life, my friends decided to help. They began questioning me on what career I would like to pursue after university, and after a hard interrogation, we found out that I wouldn't mind being a teacher! Which thinking about it, I don't actually mind since I am creative - so I wouldn't mind making presentations or powerpoints or lessons - and I love biology, so what better way to ensure a biology-related career!

However, my next problem ... biology teachers don't have the best of pays and I would at least want a comfortable pay, you know? So this is where I began toying with the idea of becoming a university lecturer: still teaching, but better pay, right? I told my friends, happy that I was hopefully coming to a decision about what i want to do, and they advised me that if I wanted to become a teacher not to waste 5 years doing medicine, when I can just take biomedical in 3 years and then become a teacher. The logic made sense since i don't want to waste my years away - or money as each year would cost £9,000. But I was still debating whether or not to do medicine - just in case I might not want to become a uni lecturer later (since i know that I change my mind a lot - and I bet you can tell that too!).

My parents realised that I was struggling to decide my future and so they told my cousins. One was the one from before - the one that went manchester Uni. Let's call her R. The other cousin, who was R's older sister and who we'll call S, had been to Nottingham uni and is practising law. S told me about three of her friends and their different situations. She told me that if I can't make up my mind between biomedical science and medicine, I should (as a back up) take biomedical science and then if I want to, go on to become a teacher. Otherwise, if I realise that I still want to do medicine (since the biomed course is similar to medicine), then I can enter medicine at postgraduate level. I liked this solution, but there was the obvious problem that if I end up doing the latter, i will spend more years at uni and thus waste more money.

Furthermore, with all this confusion in my mind, I forgot about my upcoming UKCAT exam - which I later rescheduled for 25th August, in order to give me more time to revise.

When my birthday came up in July, my cousin was there (the one that went Manchester Uni) and she asked about medicine and what unis I was thinking of. I told her that I had been looking entirely at universities for biomedical science and she was shocked and was surprised that I wasn't applying for medicine anymore. This surprised me and made me reconsider which degree should I do?

Currently, I am 17 years old and will enter year 13 this September (2016). I know that I want to apply for Birmingham uni for biomedical science (and their entry requirements are AAB or ABB + A in EPQ). I know that I can get into this - especially since I am doing an EPQ as well.
I want to also apply for Manchester Uni (AAA-ABB), which I can also hopefully get into.
I am thinking of putting Aston Uni as my back up (BBB).
I am considering whether or not I should use the last two choices for medicine or maybe for more biomedical ones, like Sheffield and Warwick. If I do apply for medicine, I would like to apply for Bham, but they say the only way a person with my GCSEs would get in is if I got a very high UKCAT score. I don't know if I would be able to achieve that.

And one last thing, my AS levels haven't exactly gone well. I haven't got my results yet - they come out on Thu 18th - but I know I have done bad in chem. I predict I'll get like a B in history, C in English literature, C in bio (hopefully) and D in chem. The reason I will get these bad grades is because my subjects that I am taking for AS/A Level are new specification and so at A2, I will get tested not only on A2 content, but also AS content too, so my mark from this year isn't exactly official (if you get me). As a result, I didn't study as hard as i could have and therefore messed up. My predicted grades will be **** and so I don't think universities will give me many offers, but I have already begun revising AS content over the summer for next years exams and plan to work my ass off to get very high scores next year.
I think no uni will give me offers this year and I'll probably have to get badass A Levels (hopefully a* in bio, A in chem and A in history), take a gap year and then reapply next year.

So in conclusion, what do you guys think of my situation? Yeah I admit I have done some stupid stuff, but should I take biomedical science or medicine? Should i take a gap year? any other useful advise? Thank you and I'm so sorry this turned out soooo long, I didn't mean to write a full-on lecture here! THANK YOU!!!
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Mutmit287
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(Original post by wimme)
Hi guys, I really love biology and so I want to focus my degree around that. Initially I thought of taking a biology degree, but I know that this degree isn't exactly the best one out there for employers.

Consequently, I decided to see if there were any other biology-related degrees that might make employers look more favourably upon me when it comes to looking for jobs. I was explaining this to my cousin (who has just done a degree at manchester uni in something ear-doctor related - sorry I can't remember the name, but now she's an audiologist/ordiologist??? Sorry I can't remember exactly what it's called), and she told me that medicine is very biology based, so why not apply for that?

Therefore, I began thinking about medicine, and thought of going to Birmingham university (which is local to me). However, a friend advised me not to apply to Bham Uni for medicine because they are GCSE heavy - for medicine - and so will prefer students with a high proportion of A*s-As, unlike my GCSEs: 2A*s, 6As and 3Bs.

This worried me a lot because I really want to go to Birmingham university. I was also thinking of applying to Manchester uni - which I don't mind much either.

I was telling my friends about my dilemma and they gave me advise on other biology related degrees I could do if I don't want to do medicine and this is where biomedical science emerged. I had never heard of it before and so I explored it when I got home. The topics involved in the courses were ones that I was interested in/didn't mind studying and there was a lot of practical work/laboratory work involved - which I think I prefer as I learn better from hands on stuff rather than just listening.

However, the careers that came from this degree were apparently things like research scientist and basically lab-type work and this didn't sound that exciting too me as it sounds like you're going to be stuck in a lab all day, doing the same repetitive tasks all over again the next day. So this slightly put me offf biomedical science.

Anyway, in my endless quest to find something to do with my life, my friends decided to help. They began questioning me on what career I would like to pursue after university, and after a hard interrogation, we found out that I wouldn't mind being a teacher! Which thinking about it, I don't actually mind since I am creative - so I wouldn't mind making presentations or powerpoints or lessons - and I love biology, so what better way to ensure a biology-related career!

However, my next problem ... biology teachers don't have the best of pays and I would at least want a comfortable pay, you know? So this is where I began toying with the idea of becoming a university lecturer: still teaching, but better pay, right? I told my friends, happy that I was hopefully coming to a decision about what i want to do, and they advised me that if I wanted to become a teacher not to waste 5 years doing medicine, when I can just take biomedical in 3 years and then become a teacher. The logic made sense since i don't want to waste my years away - or money as each year would cost £9,000. But I was still debating whether or not to do medicine - just in case I might not want to become a uni lecturer later (since i know that I change my mind a lot - and I bet you can tell that too!).

My parents realised that I was struggling to decide my future and so they told my cousins. One was the one from before - the one that went manchester Uni. Let's call her R. The other cousin, who was R's older sister and who we'll call S, had been to Nottingham uni and is practising law. S told me about three of her friends and their different situations. She told me that if I can't make up my mind between biomedical science and medicine, I should (as a back up) take biomedical science and then if I want to, go on to become a teacher. Otherwise, if I realise that I still want to do medicine (since the biomed course is similar to medicine), then I can enter medicine at postgraduate level. I liked this solution, but there was the obvious problem that if I end up doing the latter, i will spend more years at uni and thus waste more money.

Furthermore, with all this confusion in my mind, I forgot about my upcoming UKCAT exam - which I later rescheduled for 25th August, in order to give me more time to revise.

When my birthday came up in July, my cousin was there (the one that went Manchester Uni) and she asked about medicine and what unis I was thinking of. I told her that I had been looking entirely at universities for biomedical science and she was shocked and was surprised that I wasn't applying for medicine anymore. This surprised me and made me reconsider which degree should I do?

Currently, I am 17 years old and will enter year 13 this September (2016). I know that I want to apply for Birmingham uni for biomedical science (and their entry requirements are AAB or ABB + A in EPQ). I know that I can get into this - especially since I am doing an EPQ as well.
I want to also apply for Manchester Uni (AAA-ABB), which I can also hopefully get into.
I am thinking of putting Aston Uni as my back up (BBB).
I am considering whether or not I should use the last two choices for medicine or maybe for more biomedical ones, like Sheffield and Warwick. If I do apply for medicine, I would like to apply for Bham, but they say the only way a person with my GCSEs would get in is if I got a very high UKCAT score. I don't know if I would be able to achieve that.

And one last thing, my AS levels haven't exactly gone well. I haven't got my results yet - they come out on Thu 18th - but I know I have done bad in chem. I predict I'll get like a B in history, C in English literature, C in bio (hopefully) and D in chem. The reason I will get these bad grades is because my subjects that I am taking for AS/A Level are new specification and so at A2, I will get tested not only on A2 content, but also AS content too, so my mark from this year isn't exactly official (if you get me). As a result, I didn't study as hard as i could have and therefore messed up. My predicted grades will be **** and so I don't think universities will give me many offers, but I have already begun revising AS content over the summer for next years exams and plan to work my ass off to get very high scores next year.
I think no uni will give me offers this year and I'll probably have to get badass A Levels (hopefully a* in bio, A in chem and A in history), take a gap year and then reapply next year.

So in conclusion, what do you guys think of my situation? Yeah I admit I have done some stupid stuff, but should I take biomedical science or medicine? Should i take a gap year? any other useful advise? Thank you and I'm so sorry this turned out soooo long, I didn't mean to write a full-on lecture here! THANK YOU!!!
OK this OP is WAY to long and frankly doesnt really make much sense, so Im hoping you wont be to confused by my reply.

It seems to me you love biology which is great, many degrees encompass a lot of biology. But you really need to start looking into what you want to do afterwards!
- MEDICINE: do not do medicine unless you want to become a doctor, it is a long and VERY VERY challenging degree which when you graduate leads you to a stressful career of life long learning, hence if your not 100% on wanting to become a doctor and dont have that motivation it really isn't worth it and you may struggle to get through it.
- TEACHING: any degree can lead you to teaching, if you want to teach in biology then your degree will need a good % of biology modules to get a PGCE in teaching for biology. The pay really isnt that bad at all, and its a very nice secure career with great satisfaction in my opinion.
- LECTURER: any degree can lead you to lecturing, but generally lecturers at top university have PHDs in their given subject or are at least studying for one, this means they are basically researchers whom teach modules on a course. The pay is great but getting there is hard and requires many years of studying. If you want to become a lecturer after doing medicine you still have to be a practising doctor.

if your not into being in a lab all day then biomedical science probably isnt the best for you at all.

Now onto where to apply/entry requirements.
- MEDICINE: you will be so so so unlikely to get an interview at Bham for medicine with your GCSE grades im afriad so I wouldnt waste an application. Medicine is all about applying to your strengths and not just applying to unis because they are local/you like them im afriad. Manchester may be good if you have some clinical voluntary work/work experience and a high UKCAT. With your AS grades you will be lucky to get predicted a C in chemistry and so you can wave applying to medicine this year goodbye as you will not get any offers due to low predicted grades (sorry if that sounds harsh but trying to be as truthful as possible). Also if you cannot achieve close to the A grade (such as a B grade) in AS then it is very unlikely that you will get there at A2, going from a D in AS to an A at A2 is practically unheard of, be prepared to work very very very hard.

Hope this was useful advice, your OP was very confusing so not sure what your after.
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Firefly13
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I agree with the person above.

Medicine
DISCLAIMER: I do not do Medicine so this is just based on what I have heard from friends and teachers.
Even if you got all A's in your AS, you are only doing two science subjects and from the people I have met to get a chance at getting onto Medicine you need another science or Maths. Also like the person above said do not do Medicine unless you want to be a doctor. Medicine courses interview and if you go in and say you don't really want to be a doctor and are thinking of teaching/lecturing instead they'll almost certainly rejected you. At my university almost all of the medicine lectures are doing by biomedical scientists anyway, so if you want to do that you should do Biomedicine! If you want to do Medicine I think you'll have to want to be a doctor (especially given it's a five year course and you'll spend a good proportion of that in a placement hospital acting as a doctor, so if you don't like that you'll hate the degree) and you'll have to do really well on the UKCAT so they don't judge your predicted grades too harshly.

Teaching
I am about to go into my third year studying Biology and have to do a PGCE afterwards so I know quite a bit about this! I assume you would want to be a science teacher specialising in Biology? Currently the government gives out bursaries (money you don't pay back) for Biology teacher training because there aren't enough Biology teachers. At the moment this is £20,000 for the year if you get a 1st or have a PhD, or £15,000 for a 2:2, 2:1 or if you have a Masters degree. This is on top of the government loan (up to £10,000) and tuition fee loan.

Stating salaries for teachers are around £22,000 (more if you work in London). I understand at the moment that might not seem a lot to you, but that is a good stating salary. Before I started university I was very concerned about how much I'd earn so I could have all of the things I wanted, but I soon realised I was being unrealistic to expect that straight from uni - you have to start somewhere. That is a good start and it's a very secure job once you pass get your QTS (after the year you spend doing the PGCE you become a NQT, newly qualified teacher, and only become get QTS, qualified teacher status, after a year in a job). That salary will also rise the longer you're working and there are lots of opportunities for promotions (like becoming head of science). Headteachers can earn up to £100,000 a year, which isn't bad!

Lecturing
My dad is a lecturer so I can help a bit with this. All universities will require you to have at least a Masters to be a lecturer and most of them will want a PhD. Also once you become a lecturer your university will still expect you to do research because it makes the university look better if all their lecturers are discovering things. You said you didn't like the idea of working in a lab, so you need to think seriously about if you like the idea of lecturing enough to put up with the research side of it (of course no job will be perfect, and you can focus more on teaching but you will still have to spend four years doing research to get the PhD). You will also have to work long hours when you start, but it can pay very well after several years.

Conclusion
In your position I would forget Medicine and do Biomedicine. Biomedicine has the theory of Medicine without the practical side of it, which you wouldn't need unless you were going to be a doctor. Career wise it's up to you. There are a lot of graduate jobs that don't require a specific degree as well so you won't be stuck in science. Maybe think about different Biology-related degrees as well like Genetics or Zoology?

Good luck!
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Mrs House
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Enjoying biology doesn't mean you'll enjoy being a doctor. Yes medicine has some biology, human biology but the vast majority of the course will be training you HOW to be a competent doctor.

Personally I think you should do biomed.
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DharmaKitty
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(Original post by wimme)
Hi guys, I really love biology and so I want to focus my degree around that. Initially I thought of taking a biology degree, but I know that this degree isn't exactly the best one out there for employers.

Consequently, I decided to see if there were any other biology-related degrees that might make employers look more favourably upon me when it comes to looking for jobs. I was explaining this to my cousin (who has just done a degree at manchester uni in something ear-doctor related - sorry I can't remember the name, but now she's an audiologist/ordiologist??? Sorry I can't remember exactly what it's called), and she told me that medicine is very biology based, so why not apply for that?

Therefore, I began thinking about medicine, and thought of going to Birmingham university (which is local to me). However, a friend advised me not to apply to Bham Uni for medicine because they are GCSE heavy - for medicine - and so will prefer students with a high proportion of A*s-As, unlike my GCSEs: 2A*s, 6As and 3Bs.

This worried me a lot because I really want to go to Birmingham university. I was also thinking of applying to Manchester uni - which I don't mind much either.

I was telling my friends about my dilemma and they gave me advise on other biology related degrees I could do if I don't want to do medicine and this is where biomedical science emerged. I had never heard of it before and so I explored it when I got home. The topics involved in the courses were ones that I was interested in/didn't mind studying and there was a lot of practical work/laboratory work involved - which I think I prefer as I learn better from hands on stuff rather than just listening.

However, the careers that came from this degree were apparently things like research scientist and basically lab-type work and this didn't sound that exciting too me as it sounds like you're going to be stuck in a lab all day, doing the same repetitive tasks all over again the next day. So this slightly put me offf biomedical science.

Anyway, in my endless quest to find something to do with my life, my friends decided to help. They began questioning me on what career I would like to pursue after university, and after a hard interrogation, we found out that I wouldn't mind being a teacher! Which thinking about it, I don't actually mind since I am creative - so I wouldn't mind making presentations or powerpoints or lessons - and I love biology, so what better way to ensure a biology-related career!

However, my next problem ... biology teachers don't have the best of pays and I would at least want a comfortable pay, you know? So this is where I began toying with the idea of becoming a university lecturer: still teaching, but better pay, right? I told my friends, happy that I was hopefully coming to a decision about what i want to do, and they advised me that if I wanted to become a teacher not to waste 5 years doing medicine, when I can just take biomedical in 3 years and then become a teacher. The logic made sense since i don't want to waste my years away - or money as each year would cost £9,000. But I was still debating whether or not to do medicine - just in case I might not want to become a uni lecturer later (since i know that I change my mind a lot - and I bet you can tell that too!).

My parents realised that I was struggling to decide my future and so they told my cousins. One was the one from before - the one that went manchester Uni. Let's call her R. The other cousin, who was R's older sister and who we'll call S, had been to Nottingham uni and is practising law. S told me about three of her friends and their different situations. She told me that if I can't make up my mind between biomedical science and medicine, I should (as a back up) take biomedical science and then if I want to, go on to become a teacher. Otherwise, if I realise that I still want to do medicine (since the biomed course is similar to medicine), then I can enter medicine at postgraduate level. I liked this solution, but there was the obvious problem that if I end up doing the latter, i will spend more years at uni and thus waste more money.

Furthermore, with all this confusion in my mind, I forgot about my upcoming UKCAT exam - which I later rescheduled for 25th August, in order to give me more time to revise.

When my birthday came up in July, my cousin was there (the one that went Manchester Uni) and she asked about medicine and what unis I was thinking of. I told her that I had been looking entirely at universities for biomedical science and she was shocked and was surprised that I wasn't applying for medicine anymore. This surprised me and made me reconsider which degree should I do?

Currently, I am 17 years old and will enter year 13 this September (2016). I know that I want to apply for Birmingham uni for biomedical science (and their entry requirements are AAB or ABB + A in EPQ). I know that I can get into this - especially since I am doing an EPQ as well.
I want to also apply for Manchester Uni (AAA-ABB), which I can also hopefully get into.
I am thinking of putting Aston Uni as my back up (BBB).
I am considering whether or not I should use the last two choices for medicine or maybe for more biomedical ones, like Sheffield and Warwick. If I do apply for medicine, I would like to apply for Bham, but they say the only way a person with my GCSEs would get in is if I got a very high UKCAT score. I don't know if I would be able to achieve that.

And one last thing, my AS levels haven't exactly gone well. I haven't got my results yet - they come out on Thu 18th - but I know I have done bad in chem. I predict I'll get like a B in history, C in English literature, C in bio (hopefully) and D in chem. The reason I will get these bad grades is because my subjects that I am taking for AS/A Level are new specification and so at A2, I will get tested not only on A2 content, but also AS content too, so my mark from this year isn't exactly official (if you get me). As a result, I didn't study as hard as i could have and therefore messed up. My predicted grades will be **** and so I don't think universities will give me many offers, but I have already begun revising AS content over the summer for next years exams and plan to work my ass off to get very high scores next year.
I think no uni will give me offers this year and I'll probably have to get badass A Levels (hopefully a* in bio, A in chem and A in history), take a gap year and then reapply next year.

So in conclusion, what do you guys think of my situation? Yeah I admit I have done some stupid stuff, but should I take biomedical science or medicine? Should i take a gap year? any other useful advise? Thank you and I'm so sorry this turned out soooo long, I didn't mean to write a full-on lecture here! THANK YOU!!!
Don't worry about your post being too long, true it could be more concise but i know sometimes it's difficult to make stuff shorter when the topic really matters to you. You're still VERY young and shouldn't worry so much about a level grades, they're not a reflection of your intelligence, worth and resourcefulness as a human being. But unfortunately the situation these days is 'reputable' universities demand those As and Bs but don't be too concerned with that, focus on choosing a subject which is both interesting to you and mentally stimulating, going for biomedical is a good bet because if you do end up wanting to go for graduate medicine afterwards, you will be well prepared and have a wide ranging awareness of the various disciplines under the umbrella of 'biomedical science' ranging from microbiology, thru genetics to physical analytical methods like spectroscopy. that's just my two cents tho.

Anyway, i noticed your post is from a year ago, what did you decide to do in the end?

Best wishes,
dharma
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Kvothe the Arcane
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(Original post by DharmaKitty)
Don't worry about your post being too long, true it could be more concise but i know sometimes it's difficult to make stuff shorter when the topic really matters to you. You're still VERY young and shouldn't worry so much about a level grades, they're not a reflection of your intelligence, worth and resourcefulness as a human being. But unfortunately the situation these days is 'reputable' universities demand those As and Bs but don't be too concerned with that, focus on choosing a subject which is both interesting to you and mentally stimulating, going for biomedical is a good bet because if you do end up wanting to go for graduate medicine afterwards, you will be well prepared and have a wide ranging awareness of the various disciplines under the umbrella of 'biomedical science' ranging from microbiology, thru genetics to physical analytical methods like spectroscopy. that's just my two cents tho.

Anyway, i noticed your post is from a year ago, what did you decide to do in the end?

Best wishes,
dharma
Please don't resurrect year old threads. This thread is now closed.
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