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    I've finished Year 13 at Sixth Form now, i.e. my A-Levels. So, I'm wondering, does this mean I've just graduate dand would it be appropriate for me to say I'm a graduate or have just graduated? Thanks.
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    A graduate refers to someone who has finished university, I guess you'd be a school leaver.
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    I believe a graduate is someone who has completed university. So you'd be a school/college leaver instead, or you can just say you've completed your A Levels
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    That's what I thought but the definition for Graduate in Google is:

    graduatenounnoun: graduate; plural noun: graduatesˈɡradʒʊət,-djʊət/
    1. 1. a person who has successfully completed a course of study or training, especially a person who has been awarded an undergraduate or first academic degree.
    Which would make me sound better job-wise I'd think?
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    That's what I thought but the definition for Graduate in Google is:

    graduatenounnoun: graduate; plural noun: graduatesˈɡradʒʊət,-djʊət/
    1. 1. a person who has successfully completed a course of study or training, especially a person who has been awarded an undergraduate or first academic degree.
    Which would make me sound better job-wise I'd think?
    No, simply because it is misleading. I would wager that it makes you come across worse when they see that you have not studied at university. Take graduate to mean someone who has completed an undergraduate degree.
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    You're only classed as a graduate after university

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    And when they find out you have no university degree, you'll come across as a very desperate person
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    Mate this isn't america lmfao. Them lot 'graduate' Nursery as well.
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    Fine, I won't put it, but technically the definition is correct.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Fine, I won't put it, but technically the definition is correct.
    Put it in if you really want lmao

    people here are only trying to help

    Or you could explain to the employer about how Google says you're not wrong
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    (Original post by mercuryman)
    Mate this isn't america lmfao. Them lot 'graduate' Nursery as well.
    Even there "graduate" generally refers to the same thing

    If you wanna call yourself a graduate after Year 13 (grade 12), you'd say you're a "high school graduate" to remove ambiguity
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Even there "graduate" generally refers to the same thing

    If you wanna call yourself a graduate after Year 13 (grade 12), you'd say you're a "high school graduate" to remove ambiguity
    That sounds so ridiculous. Just do the sensible thing and call yourself a high school leaver lol.
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    (Original post by mercuryman)
    That sounds so ridiculous. Just do the sensible thing and call yourself a high school leaver lol.
    Nah it actually makes sense lol - you're just used to the way it's used in the UK or wherever you are.

    The reason it's used is because in the American system, unlike with A levels or a BTEC which are largely down to you, everyone graduates with a "high school diploma", making them high school graduates.
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    On a seperate note: What sounds more professional?

    Saying:

    'I'm 18 years old.'

    Or

    'I'm 19 years old in September 2016.'
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    On a seperate note: What sounds more professional?

    Saying:

    'I'm 18 years old.'

    Or

    'I'm 19 years old in September 2016.'
    Doesn't sound like something you would put in a cover letter or a CV.

    You could (and I'm just teasing here) say that you'll be 20 in September 2017. (But then think about how that sounds, and so which of your two options is better).
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Doesn't sound like something you would put in a cover letter or a CV.

    You could (and I'm just teasing here) say that you'll be 20 in September 2017. (But then think about how that sounds, and so which of your two options is better).
    Actually it's for my profile on a job finding website thing. I guess I could avoid putting my age but I've applied for noe job that I think youth might help me some what.
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    (Original post by similarBlank)
    Actually it's for my profile on a job finding website thing. I guess I could avoid putting my age but I've applied for noe job that I think youth might help me some what.
    Still not something you put on such a page or anywhere when asked for an age.

    Either avoid it or put down your exact age.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Still not something you put on such a page or anywhere when asked for an age.

    Either avoid it or put down your exact age.
    Yeah, you're probably right. I guess if they're interested they'd just ask me for my age. I'll take it off.

    I just saw other profiles who put their age and thus just thought it might be a good idea to do the same.
 
 
 
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