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    Hello, lets start of by saying that i'm about to start a levels in September, and i'm picking English literature, history and biology.

    my problem is that I've been thinking about what degree i'd like to pursue in the future, and finding that i'm getting nowhere. the most employable degrees seem to have either maths, physics, or computing in it, all subjects of which i don't really excel at. This makes me worried as i don't want to be that one person that graduates and doesn't have a job. I've been thinking about a biology degree, along with biomedical engineering, but I've read stories that there is very little placement for people like that, and how most people who complete a biology degree and go into further study, still find it hard to find a job and regret it. I'd like to believe that if i work hard i could get into some field of biology and get a job with a decent salary, but with it not being a strong degree and all (from what I've read) i don't know what do anymore. I know i have 2 more years to decide, but those 2 years will fly by fast, and it's better for me to know now since i could get some potential work experience to strengthen my CV and all. I don't know, i just feel lost, all the employable degrees i can't seem to do. I've been thinking about dropping history and taking chemistry, but i find chemistry difficult and i don't want to screw up an A-level, but then again it would perhaps help me as i plan to enter a scientific field of work. Any advice?
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    (Original post by Fabs113)
    Hello, lets start of by saying that i'm about to start a levels in September, and i'm picking English literature, history and biology.

    my problem is that I've been thinking about what degree i'd like to pursue in the future, and finding that i'm getting nowhere. the most employable degrees seem to have either maths, physics, or computing in it, all subjects of which i don't really excel at. This makes me worried as i don't want to be that one person that graduates and doesn't have a job. I've been thinking about a biology degree, along with biomedical engineering, but I've read stories that there is very little placement for people like that, and how most people who complete a biology degree and go into further study, still find it hard to find a job and regret it. I'd like to believe that if i work hard i could get into some field of biology and get a job with a decent salary, but with it not being a strong degree and all (from what I've read) i don't know what do anymore. I know i have 2 more years to decide, but those 2 years will fly by fast, and it's better for me to know now since i could get some potential work experience to strengthen my CV and all. I don't know, i just feel lost, all the employable degrees i can't seem to do. I've been thinking about dropping history and taking chemistry, but i find chemistry difficult and i don't want to screw up an A-level, but then again it would perhaps help me as i plan to enter a scientific field of work. Any advice?
    Hmm, it's true that there aren't many science options open to you, except biology ones at certain universities. If you want to expand your options, I'd certainly take either Maths or Chemistry A Level, that would at least make you eligible for some economic related course or medical ones. Additionally, have you considered doing Law?


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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    Hmm, it's true that there aren't many science options open to you, except biology ones at certain universities. If you want to expand your options, I'd certainly take either Maths or Chemistry A Level, that would at least make you eligible for some economic related course or medical ones. Additionally, have you considered doing Law?


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    I have. But i'm not that passionate about law. Plus, i'd love to take maths A level but i'm just simply not that good. I'm pretty sure i didn't do well in it in gcse (probably just scraped a C), and if i find it difficult now then i'm pretty sure i'll find it difficult when it comes to A-level
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    (Original post by Fabs113)
    I have. But i'm not that passionate about law. Plus, i'd love to take maths A level but i'm just simply not that good. I'm pretty sure i didn't do well in it in gcse (probably just scraped a C), and if i find it difficult now then i'm pretty sure i'll find it difficult when it comes to A-level
    What about Psychology? Clinical psychologists under the NHS can earn well over £50,000 more than a lot of engineers and computer scientists?
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    (Original post by Fabs113)
    Hello, lets start of by saying that i'm about to start a levels in September, and i'm picking English literature, history and biology.

    my problem is that I've been thinking about what degree i'd like to pursue in the future, and finding that i'm getting nowhere. the most employable degrees seem to have either maths, physics, or computing in it, all subjects of which i don't really excel at. This makes me worried as i don't want to be that one person that graduates and doesn't have a job. I've been thinking about a biology degree, along with biomedical engineering, but I've read stories that there is very little placement for people like that, and how most people who complete a biology degree and go into further study, still find it hard to find a job and regret it. I'd like to believe that if i work hard i could get into some field of biology and get a job with a decent salary, but with it not being a strong degree and all (from what I've read) i don't know what do anymore. I know i have 2 more years to decide, but those 2 years will fly by fast, and it's better for me to know now since i could get some potential work experience to strengthen my CV and all. I don't know, i just feel lost, all the employable degrees i can't seem to do. I've been thinking about dropping history and taking chemistry, but i find chemistry difficult and i don't want to screw up an A-level, but then again it would perhaps help me as i plan to enter a scientific field of work. Any advice?
    There is absolutely no point in taking subjects you don't like and aren't good at to enter a world of work for which you don't have much talent, by your own admission here. Far better to do the subjects you can achieve high grades at, because 60+% of graduate jobs don't require any specific degree subject. Why be a mediocre to poor scientist? That's not going to make you very competitive in a world where there are plenty of good to outstanding scientists. Be good at what you are good at and look at careers which aren't subject based.
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    I don't know actually. It would be a huge risk since psychology degrees are seen as one of the less employable degrees. I was originally going to pursue psychology but there have been many stories about how some psychology graduates either end up unemployed or end up studying something else due to no jobs being available.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    There is absolutely no point in taking subjects you don't like and aren't good at to enter a world of work for which you don't have much talent, by your own admission here. Far better to do the subjects you can achieve high grades at, because 60+% of graduate jobs don't require any specific degree subject. Why be a mediocre to poor scientist? That's not going to make you very competitive in a world where there are plenty of good to outstanding scientists. Be good at what you are good at and look at careers which aren't subject based.
    well, thanks for the advise. i'd want to do forensic anthropology but I've heard the economy isn't looking for those. or a marine biologist but i haven't heard that many success stories which is worrying
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    (Original post by Fabs113)
    I don't know actually. It would be a huge risk since psychology degrees are seen as one of the less employable degrees. I was originally going to pursue psychology but there have been many stories about how some psychology graduates either end up unemployed or end up studying something else due to no jobs being available.
    Whose telling you these stories? 70% - 80% of graduates from the great universities end up I a professional job after 6 months. If you get a first class, you're almost certain to be employed.
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    (Original post by GradeA*UnderA)
    Whose telling you these stories? 70% - 80% of graduates from the great universities end up I a professional job after 6 months. If you get a first class, you're almost certain to be employed.
    I've seen the stories from sites like the telegraph and the guardian (i'm guessing that they're not reliable sources) Well, if the statistics are true then i might pursue it. Thanks for the advice by the way.
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    (Original post by Fabs113)
    well, thanks for the advise. i'd want to do forensic anthropology but I've heard the economy isn't looking for those. or a marine biologist but i haven't heard that many success stories which is worrying
    The world is changing very fast and the jobs around when you graduate in, what, five years' time will be different to what they are now, and your ideas will have changed too. Prepare for that by doing the things that interest you and that you can do well in, because good results are always going to beat mediocre ones, and a good graduate in whatever discipline is going to be better placed than someone bumping along on the bottom of a pile of science graduates who all took science degrees because they were told they had to or they'd be out of a job, and then found out they weren't any good at it or actually all that interested in it.
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    I also want to say that, yes there are more employable degrees, but there but there are still ops available in each field. Yes they may be limited, but someone has to do them right? so why not you? I say pick what you most enjoy and get that degree and if things seem difficult afterwards then you can work things out from there. In the mean time don't pick what you won't enjoy because it's really hard to excel in something you don't like and you want to excel as much as possible. Keep your chin up and just for hard for these next 2 years!
 
 
 
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