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    Hi, I was wondering if anyone knows if you can do a masters immediately after a bachelors degree in nursing?
    I eventually want to be a nurse practitioner, I am aware there are NP MSc's but I was wondering if you could do something like Clinical or Medical sciences or something like that and that could also lead to it? Combined with a CPD prescribing course.
    Thank you.
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    (Original post by Mango65)
    Hi, I was wondering if anyone knows if you can do a masters immediately after a bachelors degree in nursing?
    I eventually want to be a nurse practitioner, I am aware there are NP MSc's but I was wondering if you could do something like Clinical or Medical sciences or something like that and that could also lead to it? Combined with a CPD prescribing course.
    Thank you.
    Yes, you can go straight into an MSc. Many people do these part time, so do a year of preceptorship and then are funded (at least partially) by their employer. Often they are part of a professional practice MSc.

    However, you can't do a prescribing course until you have had some experience as a registered nurse. Starting out as a nurse is stressful enough without the added responsibility of prescribing and therefore isn't possible. From the NMC standards of proficiency for nurse prescribers:

    "You must have at least three years’ experience as a practising nurse, midwife or specialist community public health nurse and be deemed competent by your employer to undertake the programme. Of these three years, the year immediately preceding application to the programme must have been in the clinical eld in which you intend to prescribe, eg. neonates, mental health. Part-time workers must have practised for a suf cient period to be deemed competent by their employer"
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    Yes, you can go straight into an MSc. Many people do these part time, so do a year of preceptorship and then are funded (at least partially) by their employer. Often they are part of a professional practice MSc.

    However, you can't do a prescribing course until you have had some experience as a registered nurse. Starting out as a nurse is stressful enough without the added responsibility of prescribing and therefore isn't possible. From the NMC standards of proficiency for nurse prescribers:

    "You must have at least three years’ experience as a practising nurse, midwife or specialist community public health nurse and be deemed competent by your employer to undertake the programme. Of these three years, the year immediately preceding application to the programme must have been in the clinical eld in which you intend to prescribe, eg. neonates, mental health. Part-time workers must have practised for a suf cient period to be deemed competent by their employer"
    Hi thanks for your reply. Do you know how you get a preceptorship like can you get this straight away? or do you have to work for a bit because I'd rather try to avoid working first as I would like to get my MSc then get experience x
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    (Original post by Mango65)
    Hi thanks for your reply. Do you know how you get a preceptorship like can you get this straight away? or do you have to work for a bit because I'd rather try to avoid working first as I would like to get my MSc then get experience x
    I understand where you're coming from, I too am keen to do an MSc and go back to education.

    Most newly qualified nurse posts come with a 6 or 12 month preceptorship (flying start programme if you work in Scotland), but you need to check with employers to be sure that they offer this. It is a valuable time to have mentorship and to build up your confidence.

    As I'm sure you can imagine, going from the degree into a full time masters will make starting your first job after such a big break very difficult. This isn't to say that people don't do it, but I would honestly recommend going straight into a job, getting your preceptorship done and then thinking about a masters. This will also give you time to solidify your career plans so that you can take appropriate masters modules.*
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    Get some appropriate post reg experience and find a clinical environment you enjoy working in and find interesting. Then do your masters within that area to make yourself more employable in that speciality.
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    (Original post by Mango65)
    Hi thanks for your reply. Do you know how you get a preceptorship like can you get this straight away? or do you have to work for a bit because I'd rather try to avoid working first as I would like to get my MSc then get experience x
    it does not work like this in Nursing

    the vastest majority of post-basic Masters require you to 1. have a job and 2. have some clinical experience as an RN

    There are no accelerated promotion schemes or cheat codes to a Nursing career unless you consider whoring yourself literally and metaphorically to a an abusive manager to be a legitimate career move.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    it does not work like this in Nursing

    the vastest majority of post-basic Masters require you to 1. have a job and 2. have some clinicla experience as an RN

    there are no accelerated promotion schemes or cheat codes to a Nursing career unless you consider whoring yourself literally and metaphorically to a an abusive manager to be a legitimate career move.
    😂😂😂 brilliant


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    I'm applying for a Nursing course to start in September this year, so this is really useful to know for the future. I had to look up 'preceptorship' - I hadn't come across the term before - so I have a basic idea of what it is. Can you explain how it all works?

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    (Original post by Crankyla)
    I'm applying for a Nursing course to start in September this year, so this is really useful to know for the future. I had to look up 'preceptorship' - I hadn't come across the term before - so I have a basic idea of what it is. Can you explain how it all works?

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    Preceptorship is a period in your first job after qualifying, youre given a level of support ( this varys vastly between employers and even separate departments within a hospital) to transition from being a student to a relatively competent NQ nurse. You'll get it explained at some point at uni, probably in your final year.
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    (Original post by zippyRN)
    it does not work like this in Nursing

    the vastest majority of post-basic Masters require you to 1. have a job and 2. have some clinical experience as an RN

    There are no accelerated promotion schemes or cheat codes to a Nursing career unless you consider whoring yourself literally and metaphorically to a an abusive manager to be a legitimate career move.
    Oh well don't you just have a wonderful way with words...
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    It would probably be better if you got experience first as an rn before thinking about your masters and even looking at going onto a staff bank too when you qualify it will be beneficial for you to get as much experience as you can
 
 
 
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