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How much do engineers get paid?

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    Hi, I've just graduated with a degree in civil engineering and soon start a graduate job with one of the major engineering consultancies here in the UK. I start on a salary of ~25000. I was wondering if someone could tell me what salary progression generally is like in the engineering field. I know it might sound stupid that I dont know the answer to this question despite having a degree in the field, but I've just heard so much conflicting information and really dont know anymore.
    So what is salary progression really like in the first few years after graduating? And does it jump up once you become chartered? I know that if you become a chartered accountant your salary jumps from what is a basically a standard graduate salary to ~45000 instantly if you're in one of the big accounting firms, is this the same for engineering?
    Thanks
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    (Original post by Noybb)
    Hi, I've just graduated with a degree in civil engineering and soon start a graduate job with one of the major engineering consultancies here in the UK. I start on a salary of ~25000. I was wondering if someone could tell me what salary progression generally is like in the engineering field. I know it might sound stupid that I dont know the answer to this question despite having a degree in the field, but I've just heard so much conflicting information and really dont know anymore.
    So what is salary progression really like in the first few years after graduating? And does it jump up once you become chartered? I know that if you become a chartered accountant your salary jumps from what is a basically a standard graduate salary to ~45000 instantly if you're in one of the big accounting firms, is this the same for engineering?
    Thanks
    Yes, I doubt there are many chartered engineers at your 'major engineering consultancy' who are on less than £40,000 a year. It then obviously progresses as you become more experienced.
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    Yes, I doubt there are many chartered engineers at your 'major engineering consultancy' who are on less than £40,000 a year. It then obviously progresses as you become more experienced.
    Are you currently a graduate in engineering?
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    (Original post by Noybb)
    Are you currently a graduate in engineering?
    Nope. But a quick bit of digging online will help you reach this conclusion.
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    (Original post by Noybb)
    Hi, I've just graduated with a degree in civil engineering and soon start a graduate job with one of the major engineering consultancies here in the UK. I start on a salary of ~25000. I was wondering if someone could tell me what salary progression generally is like in the engineering field. I know it might sound stupid that I dont know the answer to this question despite having a degree in the field, but I've just heard so much conflicting information and really dont know anymore.
    So what is salary progression really like in the first few years after graduating? And does it jump up once you become chartered? I know that if you become a chartered accountant your salary jumps from what is a basically a standard graduate salary to ~45000 instantly if you're in one of the big accounting firms, is this the same for engineering?
    Thanks
    I believe (from anecdotes of family friends), it rises to £30-45k after 5-10 years. Then a decent bump up once you have chartered status, of which the median is ~£60k, with maybe some variance on either side.

    That all said, it depends on the type of engineer, industry, company and location more than anything. Oil and gas will be much higher than what I've said (my dad's terminal compensation as a petroleum engineer, before going into management, was ~£90k + school fees) and of course the management track pays more in the long run.

    Engineer comp here is quite low vs what you could get overseas as an expat or even working in another developed market.



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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I believe (from anecdotes of family friends), it rises to £30-45k after 5-10 years. Then a decent bump up once you have chartered status, of which the median is ~£60k, with maybe some variance on either side.

    That all said, it depends on the type of engineer, industry, company and location more than anything. Oil and gas will be much higher than what I've said (my dad's terminal compensation as a petroleum engineer, before going into management, was ~£90k + school fees) and of course the management track pays more in the long run.

    Engineer comp here is quite low vs what you could get overseas as an expat or even working in another developed market.



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    Thanks for the reply, I too have come to understand it goes to about 35-40k in 5-10 years as you said, which is a bit concerning. I don't suppose you know what happens if you work hard for chartership status straight out of university and complete all the requirements in about 3-4 years? Does it jump up notably? or would you still be left behind because you arnt quite as experienced just yet despite achieving chartered status.
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    (Original post by Noybb)
    Thanks for the reply, I too have come to understand it goes to about 35-40k in 5-10 years as you said, which is a bit concerning. I don't suppose you know what happens if you work hard for chartership status straight out of university and complete all the requirements in about 3-4 years? Does it jump up notably? or would you still be left behind because you arnt quite as experienced just yet despite achieving chartered status.
    You'll just be put on the lower end of chartered engineer pay so ~£35k

    Edit: removed bad information due to mass misunderstanding of the requirements
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    You don't have to work hard for chartership, the requirements are literally a masters degree plus 2 years work experience. You'll just be put on the lower end of chartered engineer pay so ~£35k
    No, in order to become chartered you need to meet five key competencies - see the UK SPEC, and it will almost certainly take longer than 2 years to meet them; perhaps 3-4 as an absolute minimum, but depending on the postion you are in it can take a lot longer, or may not even be possible if you're not working at a high enough level or covering enough of the necessary competencies. Then, as the OP is civil, they will probably be looking at either the ICE or IStructE for chartership. If they go for the ICE they then also have to complete a professional review and written exercise; if it's the IStructE they have to complete a notoriously difficult exam to pass (I've heard pass rates are around 33%).
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    You don't have to work hard for chartership, the requirements are literally a masters degree plus 2 years work experience. You'll just be put on the lower end of chartered engineer pay so ~£35k
    Those are not the requirements for CEng. Please don't make stuff up.
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    Becoming a chartered engineer is not something which is done over night. You need to have shown evidenced success and experience for a range of competencies. I had a look at it myself and unless you are given A LOT of freedom at work in managing teams and projects, it will take anyone several years to have achieved enough to even bother start filling in the forms. You can get the form here: http://www.theiet.org/membership/profreg/app-form.cfm

    To my understanding, most start at about 20-30k, then slowly raise untill they get chartered where they get a much bigger raise. Speaking of how much you will get will totally depend on the industry you work in. More (high growth) IT related or oil (good luck getting a job within petroleum lolz)? Maybe more. More traditional sections with small growth? Maybe not as much. I work in cyber security and have already probably overtaken a lot of my friends whom I graduated with last summer.
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    (Original post by Noybb)
    Hi, I've just graduated with a degree in civil engineering and soon start a graduate job with one of the major engineering consultancies here in the UK. I start on a salary of ~25000. I was wondering if someone could tell me what salary progression generally is like in the engineering field. I know it might sound stupid that I dont know the answer to this question despite having a degree in the field, but I've just heard so much conflicting information and really dont know anymore.
    So what is salary progression really like in the first few years after graduating? And does it jump up once you become chartered? I know that if you become a chartered accountant your salary jumps from what is a basically a standard graduate salary to ~45000 instantly if you're in one of the big accounting firms, is this the same for engineering?
    Thanks
    Once you get qualified as Chartered Accountant you get bumped to Assistant Manager salary so 35-40k at a big 4 firm.


    Accountancy only takes 3 ish years to get chartered whereas engineering is longer and moreso if your degree isn't accredited.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Becoming a chartered engineer is not something which is done over night. You need to have shown evidenced success and experience for a range of competencies. I had a look at it myself and unless you are given A LOT of freedom at work in managing teams and projects, it will take anyone several years to have achieved enough to even bother start filling in the forms. You can get the form here: http://www.theiet.org/membership/profreg/app-form.cfm

    To my understanding, most start at about 20-30k, then slowly raise untill they get chartered where they get a much bigger raise. Speaking of how much you will get will totally depend on the industry you work in. More (high growth) IT related or oil (good luck getting a job within petroleum lolz)? Maybe more. More traditional sections with small growth? Maybe not as much. I work in cyber security and have already probably overtaken a lot of my friends whom I graduated with last summer.
    I dont suppose you have any real statistics on how long new graduates take to become chartered? And its correlation to their role and company they work? Alot to ask for i know lol
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    (Original post by Noybb)
    I dont suppose you have any real statistics on how long new graduates take to become chartered? And its correlation to their role and company they work? Alot to ask for i know lol
    Engineering pays peanuts tbh and its a bit depressing....it is possible to make good money even without being chartered but you have to get very good at a trade or skill quickly!
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    Depends on the company your working for, the industry etc. There is no set path for engineers. Whereas accountancy is really structured and you know where your gonna be in the future. Having said that I am in engineering, not chartered and on about 35k after 3 years in a graduate role.
    I think you should ask yourself what you want out of a job. What will satisfy your needs? Money is important too don't get me wrong but think about it more.*
 
 
 
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