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    I am male and currently hold a conditional offer to do Adult Nursing at a top UK university starting this September, but recently, although I am perfectly happy being a "male nurse" (I hate that term why attach gender to it?), I am starting to regret my decision. This is not because I wouldn't enjoy it or be happy with it as a career, but due to the reactions of others. I have had family members and friends bare face laugh and scoff at me/ question my motives. Teachers at school also weren't happy especially my maths teacher who had a serious problem with it and spent a good chunk of the year trying to persuade me not to do it, and even got my head of sixth-form involved! My head teacher once walked into our chemistry class of 6 males and went white as a sheet and looked shocked when our teacher told him what I was doing at uni. I think this is because I do chemistry and maths A-levels which they see as somehow "superior" to doing any degree like nursing (I also do English Language).I have done lots of work experience in care settings and have thoroughly enjoyed them. My career plan would be to be an RN for some years and then do a masters degree to become an advanced nurse practitioner working in general practice. My question is, would you discourage a male to go into nursing? If so, why? Any advice from current nursing students or otherwise would be appreciated

    -Tom
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    Do it, my best friends dad is a nurse
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    Sounds like they've got to you. I really admire you for going into Nursing. You've clearly got a vocation and you're following it. There's a terrible gender imbalance in all of the Allied Health Professions at the moment, especially nursing. Both types of people need care, but if they feel they want a male nurse, speech and language therapist or OT, for whatever reason, chances are they won't be able to get one due to lack of availability. We need more men in nursing. I think service users even find it off-putting sometimes. One of my male students is becoming a nurse and when he did experience on a cancer unit he was really welcomed by the men on the ward. He was someone for the men to talk to in the chemo lounge about things that men are generally more interested in like football and stuff. That was what really cemented it for him. The nursing staff said it was the most cheerful and lively some of those patients had been in weeks. He saw he could really make a difference and that his sex was actually an asset to the ward.*
    You're there to be a professional. Your sex or gender identity does not prevent you from being a professional. Saying that men don't do caring is like saying men don't do nappies or teaching.*
    Your school's attitude is sexist. Would they be discouraging girls from doing it? Probably not. And maths and chemistry A level are excellent for nursing. The pharmacology modules are usually the poorest scored of any in a nursing degree, so you'll sail through it. More nurses should take them as A levels really.*You'll do well. If anything, with your English Language A level, I'd be pushing you to consider something like an SLT. More males needed there too!*
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    (Original post by L33t)
    I am male and currently hold a conditional offer to do Adult Nursing at a top UK university starting this September, but recently, although I am perfectly happy being a "male nurse" (I hate that term why attach gender to it?), I am starting to regret my decision. This is not because I wouldn't enjoy it or be happy with it as a career, but due to the reactions of others. I have had family members and friends bare face laugh and scoff at me/ question my motives. Teachers at school also weren't happy especially my maths teacher who had a serious problem with it and spent a good chunk of the year trying to persuade me not to do it, and even got my head of sixth-form involved! My head teacher once walked into our chemistry class of 6 males and went white as a sheet and looked shocked when our teacher told him what I was doing at uni. I think this is because I do chemistry and maths A-levels which they see as somehow "superior" to doing any degree like nursing (I also do English Language).I have done lots of work experience in care settings and have thoroughly enjoyed them. My career plan would be to be an RN for some years and then do a masters degree to become an advanced nurse practitioner working in general practice. My question is, would you discourage a male to go into nursing? If so, why? Any advice from current nursing students or otherwise would be appreciated

    -Tom
    Don't let this bother you. Both males and females are often discouraged from going into nursing because of the long hours, difficult work and relatively low graduate salary, so you're certainly not alone in this situation. There is also the 'why didn't you become a doctor instead?' comment that everyone has to deal with at some point or another.*

    Realistically when you are on the wards you will probably get some comments about being a 'male nurse' but you will learn to deal with these professionally and after a while it won't bother you so much. You will also probably come across patients, both male and female, who do not want personal care from a male nurse. This, again, is just something you will learn to deal with. As long as you are passionate and enthusiastic about nursing, these will be minor issues. Most patients are very grateful if you provide excellent care and when you have looked after them and done the right thing, your gender doesn't come into the equation.
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    Do it. Noone ever said on their deathbed 'I'm glad I didn't......'
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    While people may look down on nursing, especially male nurses sadly, it's still a great and valuable job but it's really tough. I hope you're aware of the high drop out rate, long hours and continued assessment throughout the year

    Good luck
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    Go for it.


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    I'm a healthcare assistant, and a quarter of the nurses on our ward are men. While the numbers are unequal, the gap does seem to be closing. But it will never close completely if male applicants get put off by sexist stereotypes that say providing hands-on patient care is a woman's job. You enjoy care work, so it's very likely you'll enjoy nursing. Imagine yourself where you'd like to be in ten years' time, in a nursing specialty you love - will it really matter to you then what your old head teacher thought about nursing? Also remember that once you're on the course and then in your first qualified job, you won't be surrounded by the same kind of attitude. You'll be with people who know that men can be nurses and who don't think twice about it, so you won't always have to put up with the comments you're getting now. We get male nursing students on placement on a regular basis and while there aren't as many male students as female, there are still a good number of them. It's not like they're unicorns.
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    (Original post by opalescent)
    I'm a healthcare assistant, and a quarter of the nurses on our ward are men. While the numbers are unequal, the gap does seem to be closing. But it will never close completely if male applicants get put off by sexist stereotypes that say providing hands-on patient care is a woman's job. You enjoy care work, so it's very likely you'll enjoy nursing. Imagine yourself where you'd like to be in ten years' time, in a nursing specialty you love - will it really matter to you then what your old head teacher thought about nursing? Also remember that once you're on the course and then in your first qualified job, you won't be surrounded by the same kind of attitude. You'll be with people who know that men can be nurses and who don't think twice about it, so you won't always have to put up with the comments you're getting now. We get male nursing students on placement on a regular basis and while there aren't as many male students as female, there are still a good number of them. It's not like they're unicorns.
    Thanks, that's very reassuring
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    (Original post by L33t)
    I am male and currently hold a conditional offer to do Adult Nursing at a top UK university starting this September, but recently, although I am perfectly happy being a "male nurse" (I hate that term why attach gender to it?), I am starting to regret my decision. This is not because I wouldn't enjoy it or be happy with it as a career, but due to the reactions of others. I have had family members and friends bare face laugh and scoff at me/ question my motives. Teachers at school also weren't happy especially my maths teacher who had a serious problem with it and spent a good chunk of the year trying to persuade me not to do it, and even got my head of sixth-form involved! My head teacher once walked into our chemistry class of 6 males and went white as a sheet and looked shocked when our teacher told him what I was doing at uni. I think this is because I do chemistry and maths A-levels which they see as somehow "superior" to doing any degree like nursing (I also do English Language).I have done lots of work experience in care settings and have thoroughly enjoyed them. My career plan would be to be an RN for some years and then do a masters degree to become an advanced nurse practitioner working in general practice. My question is, would you discourage a male to go into nursing? If so, why? Any advice from current nursing students or otherwise would be appreciated

    -Tom


    You should do it if that is what makes you happy.

    At the end of the day, its your life and nursing is both fulfilling and life changing.

    I would take other people's opinions very lightly and follow my passion.

    go for it if you are 100% for it.
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    As a male nurse you have more opportunities open to you than a female one. You will be in demand from day one. Patients want to see more male staff looking after them. Your teachers sound like failures.
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    I am shocked at the reactions you have faced, but it is appalling that they are coming from people such as your head teacher. If it is your passion, then do it. Before long, you will be among many other student nurses all with similar goals to yourself and the negative reaction you face now will be a distant memory.
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    Every job has it's good points and bad points. I'd imagine nursing is perhaps more extreme than some jobs in that respect (in that the highs are really high but the bad hours etc are very tough) but if it's what you want to do then do it. It sounds like being a male isn't the issue here, people are concerned because you're very clever and think you can get onto a 'better' course than nursing. So yes, you can probably be paid more if you study maths or science or something along those lines, it sounds like you're not in the running for being a doctor rather than a nurse (and it's NOT the same thing! I imagine you lose a lot of the nice bits of nursing to be an actual doctor). Do whatever you think you want to do or you will just end up wondering if you made the wrong choice. You can change your mind 1 year in if you realise it's not for you and you can change careers later in life if you have made a mistake.
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    If you have the passion for it and If you really want to do it then go ahead. Don't listen to what your head teachers say because they won't be with you in ten years time wherever you want to be. My mum has been a nurse for more than 24 yrs and she still loves her job and the feeling that she gets when patients sent her thank you cards when they are about to leave the hospital is rewarding.
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    (Original post by FXX)
    As a male nurse you have more opportunities open to you than a female one. You will be in demand from day one. Patients want to see more male staff looking after them. Your teachers sound like failures.
    (Original post by thefarmerswife)
    I am shocked at the reactions... a distant memory.
    (Original post by doodle_333)
    Every job has... have made a mistake.
    (Original post by Workangel_24)
    If you have the passion... eave the hospital is rewarding.
    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    Don't let this... that everyone has to deal with at some point or another.Realistically when you are on the wards into the equation.
    (Original post by giella)
    Sounds like they've got to you... More males needed there too!*

    Thanks guys, your lovely comments have made me sure this is the right choice for me. I got my A-Level results last Thursday and got into my first choice uni to do my nursing degree; I will definitely be pursuing nursing as a career! Your comments have helped me a lot so thank you very much
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    Your gender has no bearing on whether you will make a good nurse or not. If you have the passion to do it and will try your hardest then the answer is yes you should apply for it
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    (Original post by L33t)
    Thanks guys, your lovely comments have made me sure this is the right choice for me. I got my A-Level results last Thursday and got into my first choice uni to do my nursing degree; I will definitely be pursuing nursing as a career! Your comments have helped me a lot so thank you very much
    What uni did you get into?
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    I might be a bit late here but I just wanted to voice my support for you! think it's ridiculous that these people think they have a right to make judgements about your choice of career. You're about to do a worthwhile degree at a prestigious university and you sound like a great person w/ a successful career ahead of you. Congrats in getting into your first choice, hold your head high and have faith in your decisions!
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    (Original post by L33t)
    I am male and currently hold a conditional offer to do Adult Nursing at a top UK university starting this September, but recently, although I am perfectly happy being a "male nurse" (I hate that term why attach gender to it?), I am starting to regret my decision. This is not because I wouldn't enjoy it or be happy with it as a career, but due to the reactions of others. I have had family members and friends bare face laugh and scoff at me/ question my motives. Teachers at school also weren't happy especially my maths teacher who had a serious problem with it and spent a good chunk of the year trying to persuade me not to do it, and even got my head of sixth-form involved! My head teacher once walked into our chemistry class of 6 males and went white as a sheet and looked shocked when our teacher told him what I was doing at uni. I think this is because I do chemistry and maths A-levels which they see as somehow "superior" to doing any degree like nursing (I also do English Language).I have done lots of work experience in care settings and have thoroughly enjoyed them. My career plan would be to be an RN for some years and then do a masters degree to become an advanced nurse practitioner working in general practice. My question is, would you discourage a male to go into nursing? If so, why? Any advice from current nursing students or otherwise would be appreciated

    -Tom
    Ooo people are dumb and will say dumb things. Balls to them, you wana be a nurse go be a nurse ffs
 
 
 
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