Gender frameworks Watch

cuzza
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#1
Report Thread starter 11 years ago
#1
Hi, I'm starting my A2 coursework and it involves gender differences in spontaneous speech.

Problem is, I'm having serious trouble actually finding any frameworks that I could use to help me. So far all I've found is Lakoff's 'Womens language'. Can't do much comparison without knowing the language of men, haha.

I've found short bits, saying stuff like men compete and qualify themselves, etc whereas women don't. I'm more looking for stuff like 'use more adjectives', 'use more tag questions' and the like.

Can anyone help me out?
Cheers!
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yellow96
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Umm, I know Lakoff said women use 'empty adjectives' like "lovely", which don't really describe anything. Also, women are more likely to use mitigated directives which I think refers to when an imperative is given in a less direct way, sometimes in the form of a question. So while a male might say "stop eating so much chocolate", a female might say "you could try not eating so much chocolate". This probably relates to the general submissiveness and friendliness of women, especially in public.
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cuzza
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Report Thread starter 11 years ago
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Thanks. Stuff like this is interesting because you rarely notice it in a conversation unless it's pointed out to you...

Anyway like I said I've already got a big list of what Lakoff said. Was kinda hoping for something a bit different.
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dark_currents
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The study that I found most helpful concerning gender, for both the exam and coursework, was Cheshire's Reading Study (1982). I found it a great starting point, and have added my notes as an attachment for you to read and use as you like. However, as is explained in the note at the bottom, it is crucial to remember that there are exceptions to patterns, contradictions between studies. I was told that it's perfectly okay to mention that, as in "Evidence in [one study] conveys that [men's speech contains more vernacular forms than women's - for example]. However, [another study] suggests the opposite." It shows more awareness to compare studies, rather than take evidence from one study as completely genuine

I would also consider Trudgill's 1974 Norwich Study (the research referenced in the note), and Milroy's Belfast Study.
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Gooner
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Have a look on the internet about people such as Pamela Fishman, Deborah Tannen and Lakoff. You'll find tonnes of investigations by people like them which highlight differences in language usage in different contexts amongst different genders. It's really quite a fascinating topic I think
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dans
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Lakoff is an especially good one.
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