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    I was thinking about whether same sex couples could theoretically have children with both their DNA by replacing the nucleus in a sex cell of an opposite gender to have the other's DNA. If so what would happen if you tried it with males and they both donated a 'Y' chromosome? I've also heard that some females can have some 'Y' chromosomes as well as 'X' chromosomes so could it already possible children with 2 Y chromosomes exist?
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    It could produce a clone of one parent it'll have to be of the female though
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    Actually, ignore my other comment I read the question wrong. Yes it could happen for 2 males. If you want a explanation why feel free to ask
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    (Original post by elihowitz)
    I was thinking about whether same sex couples could theoretically have children with both their DNA by replacing the nucleus in a sex cell of an opposite gender to have the other's DNA. If so what would happen if you tried it with males and they both donated a 'Y' chromosome? I've also heard that some females can have some 'Y' chromosomes as well as 'X' chromosomes so could it already possible children with 2 Y chromosomes exist?
    I don't think the child would be viable at all. It would be incredibly rare for a woman to have a Y chromosome due to their massive size difference and genetic composition.


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    (Original post by elihowitz)
    I was thinking about whether same sex couples could theoretically have children with both their DNA by replacing the nucleus in a sex cell of an opposite gender to have the other's DNA. If so what would happen if you tried it with males and they both donated a 'Y' chromosome? I've also heard that some females can have some 'Y' chromosomes as well as 'X' chromosomes so could it already possible children with 2 Y chromosomes exist?
    This foetus wouldn't be viable with 2 Y chromosomes and no X chromosome. Scientists have already demonstrated that it's possible with mice to create offspring from two males, with no direct genetic link to the female that birthed them. My understanding is that it is possible to create male and female offspring from two fathers by manipulating the embryo using stem cells. However, because normal females do not have Y chromosomes, it is impossible to create males from two mothers.
    There have been experiments in mammals where genetic material from 2 females has been used to create a child. The child is always female (XX). I believe that the farthest they went with it is in mice but it could work in humans as well, obviously though because of the ethical controversies, this hasn't been attempted.
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    (Original post by elihowitz)
    I was thinking about whether same sex couples could theoretically have children with both their DNA by replacing the nucleus in a sex cell of an opposite gender to have the other's DNA. If so what would happen if you tried it with males and they both donated a 'Y' chromosome? I've also heard that some females can have some 'Y' chromosomes as well as 'X' chromosomes so could it already possible children with 2 Y chromosomes exist?
    I don't quite understand what you mean, but it is not possible to have children with 2 eggs or 2 sperms.
    You can get females that are XY but they lack the SRY gene that is usually on the Y from males. The SRY gene is what makes a male a male and not a female.
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    (Original post by mrhedgehog)
    I don't quite understand what you mean, but it is not possible to have children with 2 eggs or 2 sperms.
    You can get females that are XY but they lack the SRY gene that is usually on the Y from males. The SRY gene is what makes a male a male and not a female.
    I meant say you were to try and create a child with the DNA of 2 females, you could use on of their egg cells, and then take the nucleus from the other's egg cells and implant it into a sperm cell which would fuse with the egg, so the sperm donor wouldn't be donating their DNA. Also would you mind explaining what the SRY gene is?
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    Also thank you to everyone has answered the question
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    The first part of the question is possible but the second definitely isnt
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    (Original post by elihowitz)
    I meant say you were to try and create a child with the DNA of 2 females, you could use on of their egg cells, and then take the nucleus from the other's egg cells and implant it into a sperm cell which would fuse with the egg, so the sperm donor wouldn't be donating their DNA. Also would you mind explaining what the SRY gene is?
    Okay now I understand, but there are certain genes that are active only in males and certain that are active only in females and both contribute to the growth and wellbeing of the embryo. There are some examples of these genes that I can't remember right now.
    The SRY gene codes for a protein that initiates testicular development in simple terms.
 
 
 
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