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    I want to know everything! Everything I hear and see I have to go home look it up and write it in a pad so I can fully understand literally every illness, wound, dressing, medication I can think of! But it's hurting my brain now and i simply can't do it. I know not everyone knows everything but I want to know everything 😂 I want to be able to offer advice to my patients and put them at ease that I know what I'm talking about. Was anyone else the same? Have you any tips on how to research things and make them stick?! Any tips appreciated


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    I guess either writing things concisely in your own words or putting your knowledge into action would be useful. Any idea how this desire to know everything came about?
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    (Original post by wbnurse)
    I want to know everything! Everything I hear and see I have to go home look it up and write it in a pad so I can fully understand literally every illness, wound, dressing, medication I can think of! But it's hurting my brain now and i simply can't do it. I know not everyone knows everything but I want to know everything 😂 I want to be able to offer advice to my patients and put them at ease that I know what I'm talking about. Was anyone else the same? Have you any tips on how to research things and make them stick?! Any tips appreciated


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    btw if this is not related i advice u to not read this comment..i might just be talking nonsense. this is probably not related or kind of related idk tbh.basically i leave out the less important information.I have a short term memory so its kind of easy to just "throw"out some useless information in my head.To make things stick to u I look at pictures and also i advice u to be in a calm mood when researching.This helps u remember better bc u r calm and not to stressed.so it makes u focus basically.
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    (Original post by LDS16)
    I guess either writing things concisely in your own words or putting your knowledge into action would be useful. Any idea how this desire to know everything came about?
    I should of worded it different....I have a desire to be the best nurse I can be by not only having the obvious qualities but also offer my patients the best advice I see fit. And I admire knowledgeable people enormously and think "I want to be like you some day!" I've met so many already


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    (Original post by wbnurse)
    I should of worded it different....I have a desire to be the best nurse I can be by not only having the obvious qualities but also offer my patients the best advice I see fit. And I admire knowledgeable people enormously and think "I want to be like you some day!" I've met so many already


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    This sort of thing doesn't happen instantly, it's a slow process and nursing is all about continuing to learn, even long after you've qualified. Generally it isn't until you've been able to put this knowledge into practice that you start to feel comfortable. I find explaining things to junior students helps me to solidify my knowledge, but really nursing is not like an academic course where you can read and research facts and retain them in a way that is useful to your nursing practice.
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    (Original post by wbnurse)
    I should of worded it different....I have a desire to be the best nurse I can be by not only having the obvious qualities but also offer my patients the best advice I see fit. And I admire knowledgeable people enormously and think "I want to be like you some day!" I've met so many already


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    Ah okay, I see. I think what the person above said is probably better than what I could suggest
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    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    This sort of thing doesn't happen instantly, it's a slow process and nursing is all about continuing to learn, even long after you've qualified. Generally it isn't until you've been able to put this knowledge into practice that you start to feel comfortable. I find explaining things to junior students helps me to solidify my knowledge, but really nursing is not like an academic course where you can read and research facts and retain them in a way that is useful to your nursing practice.
    I would totally agree with this. I'm far more confident in understanding and explaining the common conditions and treatments seen on my ward than I ever was as a student. Students dive in and out of different placements. One thing I only properly learnt in my second year was that placements are a "Taster" more than a chance to learn absolutely everything about that speciality of nursing.

    For the OP directly wbnurse - love your enthusiasm, and love that your motivation to learn more is for the end result of better patient care. Two key things for you to learn here, I think, as I was very similar to you.

    1) Get good at saying to patients that you don't know the answer. It seems hard at first, as you'll be nervous about the reaction you'll get, but I find patients appreciate your honesty. Promise to find out and get back to them asap - then you learn too.

    2) Try and harness your enthusiasm to certain key skills or knowledge you know you need to focus on. It was something a few mentors I think worked on with me as I found by trying to learn everything I spread myself too thin, and subsequently didn't get the depth of knowledge or skills I desired (Or even required).

    Just my insights from being in a similar position as you. Take from that what you want. I might be chatting nonsense, and I'm sure other posters will chime in if I am!
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    I would totally agree with this. I'm far more confident in understanding and explaining the common conditions and treatments seen on my ward than I ever was as a student. Students dive in and out of different placements. One thing I only properly learnt in my second year was that placements are a "Taster" more than a chance to learn absolutely everything about that speciality of nursing.

    For the OP directly wbnurse - love your enthusiasm, and love that your motivation to learn more is for the end result of better patient care. Two key things for you to learn here, I think, as I was very similar to you.

    1) Get good at saying to patients that you don't know the answer. It seems hard at first, as you'll be nervous about the reaction you'll get, but I find patients appreciate your honesty. Promise to find out and get back to them asap - then you learn too.

    2) Try and harness your enthusiasm to certain key skills or knowledge you know you need to focus on. It was something a few mentors I think worked on with me as I found by trying to learn everything I spread myself too thin, and subsequently didn't get the depth of knowledge or skills I desired (Or even required).

    Just my insights from being in a similar position as you. Take from that what you want. I might be chatting nonsense, and I'm sure other posters will chime in if I am!
    As someone going into the Nursing and who experiences a similar mindset as OP I find your post hugely reassuring. Also just to add, I have seen your posts regularly in this section of TSR and find your words really comforting and insightful from a person who is experienced and already in pratice. Especially as you're someone who can give those starting out or soon to start out some kind words. So thanks for that, I really do appreciate your advice! :-)
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    (Original post by Amy. J S)
    As someone going into the Nursing and who experiences a similar mindset as OP I find your post hugely reassuring. Also just to add, I have seen your posts regularly in this section of TSR and find your words really comforting and insightful from a person who is experienced and already in pratice. Especially as you're someone who can give those starting out or soon to start out some kind words. So thanks for that, I really do appreciate your advice! :-)
    Thank you, that's ever so kind and really encouraging. I only have just under a year's experience but pleased to be able to help!

    Please just shout if there is anything else you need to know or are anxious about
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    The thing is with nursing as it is with most healthcare disciplines, you're never going to know everything, there's always something to learn, it's what excites me about my work and keeps me so engaged. As you go on through your training and career, you'll find that while you don't know everything, you'll be able to make a petty good guess based on experience. I don't know every dressing here is out on the market, but can guess the type which is most appropriate for a certain wound based on what my goal is. I don't know what every medicine is, or how they all work, but I know how to access resources and other members of the MDT so that I can administer something unfamiliar safely. wbnurse, as others have said, university gives you the bare bones to build a nursing career on, try not to end up "not seeing the wood for the trees"

    It's great to be so keen, I admire how enthusiastic you are OP and it's brilliant to have a student with so much enthusiasm and interest work with me, don't lose it

    (Original post by Charlotte49)
    I find explaining things to junior students helps me to solidify my knowledge, but really nursing is not like an academic course where you can read and research facts and retain them in a way that is useful to your nursing practice.
    Teaching is a great way to build confidence around a topic and consolidate your own learning, as well as helping others develop
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    I would totally agree with this. I'm far more confident in understanding and explaining the common conditions and treatments seen on my ward than I ever was as a student. Students dive in and out of different placements. One thing I only properly learnt in my second year was that placements are a "Taster" more than a chance to learn absolutely everything about that speciality of nursing.

    For the OP directly wbnurse - love your enthusiasm, and love that your motivation to learn more is for the end result of better patient care. Two key things for you to learn here, I think, as I was very similar to you.

    1) Get good at saying to patients that you don't know the answer. It seems hard at first, as you'll be nervous about the reaction you'll get, but I find patients appreciate your honesty. Promise to find out and get back to them asap - then you learn too.

    2) Try and harness your enthusiasm to certain key skills or knowledge you know you need to focus on. It was something a few mentors I think worked on with me as I found by trying to learn everything I spread myself too thin, and subsequently didn't get the depth of knowledge or skills I desired (Or even required).

    Just my insights from being in a similar position as you. Take from that what you want. I might be chatting nonsense, and I'm sure other posters will chime in if I am!
    Thankyou very much that's really helpful. What I have been doing so far is looking bits up at a time and I've created my own scrap book if you will....put it this way I've sat and read about diabetes for so long and my brain is boggled! I'm trying to focus on one thing at a time. Hands on I'm super confident but I'm really not an academic person so I think it's my anxiety that maybe rearing its ugly head


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