How likely is it that you won't get into medicine with top grades?

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username2190247
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I'm in a bit of a tough place at the moment. I've decided to wait for my results and then if they're good enough (AAA+), I'll take a year out and apply for medicine. But people have been telling me that there's a high chance I would get 4 rejections if I applied in my gap year, even if I got something like A*AA. Is this true, or is it nonsense? Surely if other parts of my application are good (which I will make sure they are), and my grades are good, I won't be rejected by 4 different Unis?
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nexttime
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The rate of getting 4 rejections is in the region of 62%. I think its safe to assume that around 90% of applicants go on to get AAA+, so ignoring all other factors, your chances of 4 rejections is probably still >50%.

Once you start saying 'but the rest of my application will be good' attaching percentages is going to be impossible. And besides: everyone says that.
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9910224
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(Original post by ASTK98)
I'm in a bit of a tough place at the moment. I've decided to wait for my results and then if they're good enough (AAA+), I'll take a year out and apply for medicine. But people have been telling me that there's a high chance I would get 4 rejections if I applied in my gap year, even if I got something like A*AA. Is this true, or is it nonsense? Surely if other parts of my application are good (which I will make sure they are), and my grades are good, I won't be rejected by 4 different Unis?
Gap years reducing chances of getting in is total balls. Take it from a medical student who applied after one gap year and got 4 interviews. If you do get those grades, get as much out of that gap year as you can, learn about medicine as a career and you'll keep your chances high.

Best of luck!
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username2190247
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(Original post by 9910224)
Gap years reducing chances of getting in is total balls. Take it from a medical student who applied after one gap year and got 4 interviews. If you do get those grades, get as much out of that gap year as you can, learn about medicine as a career and you'll keep your chances high.

Best of luck!
I hope so mate, after the UKCAT exam I plan on spending 2/3 months researching about medicine and reading books before interviews start rolling in. What were your grades by the way (if you don't mind me asking)?
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9910224
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(Original post by ASTK98)
I hope so mate, after the UKCAT exam I plan on spending 2/3 months researching about medicine and reading books before interviews start rolling in. What were your grades by the way (if you don't mind me asking)?
A*AAA. But that's irrelevant. As long as you get 3 As and a solid personal statement, you have a shot at an interview.

And I'm liking your plan. That's pretty much what I did, except I had time so the reading was stretched out to a year.
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KrisD98
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medicine has poor grad prospects don't do it
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username2190247
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(Original post by 9910224)
A*AAA. But that's irrelevant. As long as you get 3 As and a solid personal statement, you have a shot at an interview.

And I'm liking your plan. That's pretty much what I did, except I had time so the reading was stretched out to a year.
Cheers mate! Glad someone offered some meaningful advice. People just want to see you give up and fail I guess.
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9910224
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(Original post by ASTK98)
Cheers mate! Glad someone offered some meaningful advice. People just want to see you give up and fail I guess.
No worries! If you need anything else, feel free to message me.
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ronnydandam
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(Original post by KrisD98)
medicine has poor grad prospects don't do it
job security
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StudentInSociety
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(Original post by ASTK98)
I'm in a bit of a tough place at the moment. I've decided to wait for my results and then if they're good enough (AAA+), I'll take a year out and apply for medicine. But people have been telling me that there's a high chance I would get 4 rejections if I applied in my gap year, even if I got something like A*AA. Is this true, or is it nonsense? Surely if other parts of my application are good (which I will make sure they are), and my grades are good, I won't be rejected by 4 different Unis?
Some Med schools like gap year students because they do meaningful things in their gap year to build up their qualities as future doctors. If you do more work experience, some work in a school lab or something STEM related and get a job, it makes your Personal Statement look better!

As long as you're doing something meaningful for a year, and have good grades like AAA+, you're in with a shot like everyone else
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You're chance of getting rejected from Medicine if you have the top grades is the same as someone who doesn't have the grades, if you don't have the personality and qualities they're looking for and haven't reflected adequately on your personal statement or not applied tactically.
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It's not all about the grades tbh, take it from me, I managed to get in with A*AB, so nothing special.

The thing about medicine is that most applicants apply with AAA+, so what medical schools do is differentiate between all these people who have the grades, and see which applicant is most 'suited' to becoming a doctor. The thing that you have to make sure you do is make yourself stand out - doesn't mean you need to do something amazing, but at least have some quality about you that will make you 'better suited' than the next applicant.

Also, and I can't stress this enough, APPLY TO YOUR STRENGTHS. If you have an amazing UKCAT score, apply to a uni like Kings, or if you're doing BMAT and have a good score, go for UCL. No point in applying to Bristol that doesn't even look at UKCAT or BMAT. So go through each uni and be really harsh on yourself - who would chose you out of a pile of applicants that might have better grades than you/more experience blah blah blah?

If you want it bad enough, you'll get in, I promise that. Good luck!
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Mutmit287
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(Original post by ASTK98)
I'm in a bit of a tough place at the moment. I've decided to wait for my results and then if they're good enough (AAA+), I'll take a year out and apply for medicine. But people have been telling me that there's a high chance I would get 4 rejections if I applied in my gap year, even if I got something like A*AA. Is this true, or is it nonsense? Surely if other parts of my application are good (which I will make sure they are), and my grades are good, I won't be rejected by 4 different Unis?
Medicine has between 60-65% of applicants getting 0 offers out of 4 each year, so the failiure rate is very very high. Considering most (around 90%) of all medicine applicants meet the minimum requirements of AAA at A2, a decent amount of voluntary work and work experience and good GCSE grades it means that gaining way above the minimum requirements is often what is required to gain an offer.

High GCSE grades (5+A* grades), good UKCAT score (650+) and good achieved or predicted A2 grades (AAA/A*AA or above) are what most candidates have to offer when applying plus the work experience.
The key is to apply to your strengths, by applying to universities where your credentials stand out (I.e. applying to a uni which heavily considers GCSEs if you have amazing GCSE grades) you have a much much greater chance of getting an interview and hence getting an offer. The aim is to apply to universities where you are likely to get an interview and then you are more likely to get an offer, a simple no brainer.

Many applicants make the mistakes of limiting their university choices for medicine or not realising that the minimum requirements werent good enough for an interview, or not understanding the universities admissions policy and what they were looking for, and this is why so many do not get offers. Do your research and apply wise and you will have a strong chance at an interview.
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9910224
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Yeah, one thing I forgot to mention that the last two posters did, and the importance of this cannot be stressed enough - APPLY TO YOUR STRENGTHS!

When it comes to picking the universities, two or three factors seem to be really important in tactically figuring out what universities to apply to - GCSE grades, UKCAT results, and BMAT results. That's off the top of my head. Your application should have one of these as a strength to guarentee an interview.

I would also suggest getting to grips with what multiple mini interviews entail and how to do well in them. A majority of the medical schools in the country now do multiple mini-interviews, so chances are, you'll end up applying to one that does MMI.

Best of luck!
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nexttime
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(Original post by ASTK98)
Cheers mate! Glad someone offered some meaningful advice. People just want to see you give up and fail I guess.
Or alternatively: they're correct :rolleyes:

Not that a high chance of rejection need prohibit you from trying anyway - there is some good advice on here on how to minimise that risk. But going into denial isn't helpful. This is a huge decision for you - at least do yourself the credit of considering all the information. And the relevant information at this time is yes, there is a big risk of you not getting any offers.
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Doc2be
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Once you meet the minimum academic entry requirements for getting into each uni then the rest of your application is based on your ukcat/bmat, and on your extracurriculars and work experience. What are you planning to do with your gap year to show your dedication to medicine? Without any decent work experience you will have little chance of getting in - grades alone are not enough as everyone has similar grades.


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username2190247
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(Original post by Doc2be)
Once you meet the minimum academic entry requirements for getting into each uni then the rest of your application is based on your ukcat/bmat, and on your extracurriculars and work experience. What are you planning to do with your gap year to show your dedication to medicine? Without any decent work experience you will have little chance of getting in - grades alone are not enough as everyone has similar grades.




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I already have a decent amount of work experience. Worked in a medical centre for 2 weeks and shadowed a doctor in a hospital for 2 weeks too. In my gap year I plan to work in a medical related environment to add to my experience
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(Original post by ASTK98)
I already have a decent amount of work experience. Worked in a medical centre for 2 weeks and shadowed a doctor in a hospital for 2 weeks too. In my gap year I plan to work in a medical related environment to add to my experience
Ok well all that sounds good! It's a hugely important part of getting into medicine and the more experience you have of interacting with others etc will really help you stand out and help you with your interviews. Getting the grades and having a variety of different work experiences - and understanding what you have learnt/taken away from each experience will go a long way to helping you get a place! Really make the most of your gap year and do all you can to enhance your experience!


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username2190247
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(Original post by nexttime)
Or alternatively: they're correct :rolleyes:

Not that a high chance of rejection need prohibit you from trying anyway - there is some good advice on here on how to minimise that risk. But going into denial isn't helpful. This is a huge decision for you - at least do yourself the credit of considering all the information. And the relevant information at this time is yes, there is a big risk of you not getting any offers.
Your statistic doesn't provide any context, I'm saying what's the chances of getting 4 rejections if the academic side of my application is near perfect (yes I know EC stuff and work experience are important). Your stat doesn't break down why people were rejected, the majority of people that get rejected are probably the ones that apply with their AS grades despite them not being that great. I doubt a lot of gap year applicants who have achieved AAA and a high UKCAT score get 4 rejections, you know?

I appreciate the advice though!
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(Original post by ASTK98)
Your statistic doesn't provide any context, I'm saying what's the chances of getting 4 rejections if the academic side of my application is near perfect (yes I know EC stuff and work experience are important). Your stat doesn't break down why people were rejected, the majority of people that get rejected are probably the ones that apply with their AS grades despite them not being that great. I doubt a lot of gap year applicants who have achieved AAA and a high UKCAT score get 4 rejections, you know?

I appreciate the advice though!
I do not believe that almost 2 in 3 applicants apply without at least AAA at AS. I do not have any definitive data to back that up, but I do firmly believe you are wrong on this.

Anecdotally, I had a 775 UKCAT and AAAAA at AS, and got rejected from all 3 of the UKCAT unis I applied to. 'Well there must have been something else wrong with your application' - well yes clearly, but I didn't know what it was at the time. How do you know that's not going to be you?

And as to just assuming you will get a high UKCAT: I can only wish you luck.
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