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    Hi!

    Anyone know any good biochemistry related books to limber me up for this October?

    Also, anyone else doing biochemistry....
    What do you hope to do with your degree?
    What sort of research areas would you like to go in to?
    Does industrial or academic research appeal to you more?

    Cat x
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    Anyone care to help Cat out?

    I'm clueless :confused:
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    I'm not doing biochem, and I don't know what books my uni reccomends for biochem, but for straight chem there's a book called 'Chemical Principles' by Atkins and Jones which we're recommended to buy - its got physical, inorganic and organic chem and bits of bio and analytical chem, and covers the basics from A-level and carries it on a bit further without too much detail - it shows how each concept leads to different principles without getting too complicated so shouldn't scare you too much! At UEA we use a lot of books written by Peter Atkins (he mainly does inorganic and physical chemistry) but I don't know if any other places use them as core text books as well as us.
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    (Original post by piranha85)
    Hi!

    Anyone know any good biochemistry related books to limber me up for this October?

    Also, anyone else doing biochemistry....
    What do you hope to do with your degree?
    What sort of research areas would you like to go in to?
    Does industrial or academic research appeal to you more?

    Cat x
    Stryer.

    End of.

    The bible!
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    (Original post by piranha85)
    Hi!

    Anyone know any good biochemistry related books to limber me up for this October?

    Also, anyone else doing biochemistry....
    What do you hope to do with your degree?
    What sort of research areas would you like to go in to?
    Does industrial or academic research appeal to you more?

    Cat x
    hi there, i've got 'Biochemistry - Stryer(the author)' - a big green text-book on all things biochem!

    i do biochem as a med student and may well do an intercalated degree in it (one year away). which uni are you doing biochem? the degree can be used for pretty much anything, although lots of people opt for Masters courses first.

    ion channels (yes, they are really majorly exciting) seem to be the big biochemical thing at the moment, although pharmacology also covers this in terms of research.

    hopefully a UKL biochemist will beable to talk about research interests..
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Stryer.

    End of.

    The bible!

    now that was one BIG concidence! we must be very impressionable by stryer :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by timeofyourlife)
    hi there, i've got 'Biochemistry - Stryer(the author)' - a big green text-book on all things biochem!
    I got the red edition! Will have to upgrade in September - grr! But then again, I'm not too aware of any new major, teachable at undergrad levels biochem discoveries... May be I will just be tight
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    (Original post by timeofyourlife)
    now that was one BIG concidence! we must be very impressionable by stryer :rolleyes:
    LOL!

    Can just remember being told in genetic lectures 'read stryer', in 'biochem lectures 'read stryer', by my friend who did a fab impression of out biochem lecturer 'read stryer', so I though what the hell! And read it
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    I got the red edition! Will have to upgrade in September - grr! But then again, I'm not too aware of any new major, teachable at undergrad levels biochem discoveries... May be I will just be tight
    you could be missing out on a new-found tertiary structure in the p53 protein :eek: many a sleepless night i have spend worrying about that protein
    -is the information up-to-date enough?? have we got any credible research to back up these hugely controversial claims?? what will tony blair make of it??

    i even lost my girlfriend due to fights over whether the new edition of stryer was worth it - face facts, lives could be lost - get to your local Waterstones NOW!
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    (Original post by timeofyourlife)
    you could be missing out on a new-found tertiary structure in the p53 protein :eek: many a sleepless night i have spend worrying about that protein
    -is the information up-to-date enough?? have we got any credible research to back up these hugely controversial claims?? what will tony blair make of it??

    i even lost my girlfriend due to fights over whether the new edition of stryer was worth it - face facts, lives could be lost - get to your local Waterstones NOW!
    My D,Phil is Oncology and signal transduction - I know all about the horrors of p53 TRy putting it into the ATM pathway, hooking it up to BRCA 1 and 2 and seeing if you are still sane at the end of trying to memorise it all for evil viva!

    LOL! if it's life or death, I shall put new Stryer on my book list
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    My D,Phil is Oncology and signal transduction - I know all about the horrors of p53 TRy putting it into the ATM pathway, hooking it up to BRCA 1 and 2 and seeing if you are still sane at the end of trying to memorise it all for evil viva!p
    ahh *forgetting he's talking to a doctor in a specific area of biochem*. that's a another argument that caused the downfall of my relationship - how suppression of p53-dependent apoptosis by Bcl-2 delays tumor progression! i think we're appearing on Trisha next week where she swears and leaves the studio because of the harsh truth picked up by a life-time of stryer.

    and her poor mother thought reading her stryer instead of enid blyton would lead to better emotional stability in her life..
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Stryer.

    End of.

    The bible!
    I concur.
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    Who is this Stryer you speak of? Why have I never come across him? Is that a crime?????

    A this p53 protein bloody hell sounds interesting. And how the hell can you loose a gf over a protein, timeofyourlife? ATrisha eh? It caused that much turbulence in your lives?

    can't wait to start the course now!
    To whoeva is was who asked: Im going to York - they really emphasised the chemistry alot and their tutorial system sounds cool. Anyone else going?
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    My D,Phil is Oncology and signal transduction - I know all about the horrors of p53 TRy putting it into the ATM pathway, hooking it up to BRCA 1 and 2 and seeing if you are still sane at the end of trying to memorise it all for evil viva!

    LOL! if it's life or death, I shall put new Stryer on my book list
    p53? Is this related to TP53?

    BRCA 1 and 2 - are these those breast cancer causing genes?

    * shiny ain't no geneticist *
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    (Original post by piranha85)
    Who is this Stryer you speak of? Why have I never come across him? Is that a crime?????
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/...413538-5573423
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    (Original post by shiny)
    p53? Is this related to TP53?
    (Original post by shiny)



    BRCA 1 and 2 - are these those breast cancer causing genes?



    * shiny ain't no geneticist *


    TP53 and p53 are synonymous - some people add the T (very recent US directive!) which stands for Tumour.

    As for BRCA1 and 2 - here's an excerpt from Fluffy, 2003 (copy write ) nb RAD51 = a DNA repair gene (homologous recombination):

    Additional proteins not identified in S. cerevisiae but demonstrated to be required for mammalian HR repair include BRCA1 and BRCA2. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 were originally identified through an association with familial breast and ovarian cancers, BRCA2 mutations being the most common inherited genetic alteration so far identified in familial pancreatic cancer (Murphy et al., 2002). BRCA2 has been demonstrated to control the function of RAD51, with RAD51 foci failing to form in BRCA2-deficient cells. This suggests that BRCA2 transports RAD51 to of DNA damage (Chen et al., 1999; Pellegrini et al., 2002). Moreover, BRCA1 has also been shown to interact with RAD51 (Scully et al., 1997a; Scully et al., 1997b), although later research suggests that this is probably achieved indirectly through BRCA2 (Yuan et al., 1999). Thus, it has been proposed that the major function of BRCA2 in DSB repair is through control of the RAD51 recombinase, while BRCA1 has a more general role as a link between the sensing/signalling and effector components of the mammalian response to DNA damage. Such a link would ensure that the response generated is appropriate to the type of damage sensed. BRCA1 has been demonstrated to become phosphorylated by ATM, ATR and CHK2 in response to a variety of DNA damage types. ATM and CHK2 phosphorylate BRCA1 after ionizing radiation, whereas ATR phosphorylates BRCA1 after UV treatment and replication arrest (reviewed in Venkitaraman, 2002).
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    In English? :confused:
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    (Original post by shiny)
    In English? :confused:
    In familial cnacers, both are implicated in breast and ovarian cancer. Brca2- is also implicated in pancreatic cancer.

    Having said that BRCA mutations only make up 5% of all breast cancer. until more genetic triggers are found, the other 95% of breast cancer cases have to be classed as sporadic.
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    Ok, so what did you discover?
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    BRCA2 has been demonstrated to control the function of RAD51, with RAD51 foci failing to form in BRCA2-deficient cells. This suggests that BRCA2 transports RAD51 to of DNA damage (Chen et al., 1999; Pellegrini et al., 2002). Moreover, BRCA1 has also been shown to interact with RAD51 (Scully et al., 1997a; Scully et al., 1997b), although later research suggests that this is probably achieved indirectly through BRCA2 (Yuan et al., 1999).
    i do wish you'd stop turning me on with all of that dirty talk fluffy
 
 
 

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