We're the Peer Support Volunteers, ask us anything! Watch

Katiekarcheski
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#41
Report 8 months ago
#41
I have anxiety and it's really bad at the moment. My sister and mum also suffer and I want to help them. My sister gets no support at school and I can see my mum is at breaking point and I am anxious too which doesn't help.
I had my first panic attack today. So have been sent home. But I can see both my mum and sister are suffering. I want to help them and don't know what to do.
0
quote
reply
Kindred
  • TSR Support Team
  • Peer Support Volunteers
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#42
Report 7 months ago
#42
(Original post by Katiekarcheski)
I have anxiety and it's really bad at the moment. My sister and mum also suffer and I want to help them. My sister gets no support at school and I can see my mum is at breaking point and I am anxious too which doesn't help.
I had my first panic attack today. So have been sent home. But I can see both my mum and sister are suffering. I want to help them and don't know what to do.
Hi there. Sorry it took a while to get back to you.
Unfortunately there isn't a lot you can do to help people with mental health problems because it's so much inside them. Trying to change that by yourself a) just won't get anywhere and b) can be really hard on your own well being and mental health.
What you can do though is try to be supportive and potentially suggest some things that could help them. That often just means little things like trying to be open minded, the odd thing like getting them a cup of tea after a long day, running them a bath, having a casual chat etc.

Is there any support you are currently getting for your anxiety? Not only could it help you feel better, but feeling better in yourself can make you more able to be supportive of others.
A good place to start is to see your GP and discuss different types of support. School can also be useful because they'll have some form of counselling service you can use and talking about things can be a big help.

Feel free to post in the Mental Health section for some more advice. The community there can be very supportive and can often add a bit of personal experience to what they say which can be comforting. You could also have a look at some sites like mind.org, childline etc for info on mental health and relationships.

Hope that helps.
1
quote
reply
Miss B'
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#43
Report 7 months ago
#43
Sorry to burden this thread, as this isn't about me, but I didn't want to distract with my own thread in the forum either:

I've found lots of posts supporting individuals in coping with mental health difficulties but I'm trying to find advice on how to be the person in a relationship with/ living with (some time in the near future fingers crossed :bigsmile:) / supporting someone with OCD, anxiety, depression (in order of decreasing severity.

I've looked online at 'top 10 ways to support' etc but apart from finding them very basic - Number 1: take care of yourself first. (Thanks but I'm fine) - or very contradictory and confusing - Number 2: Talk about OCD openly. Number 3: Don't talk about OCD too much (fml) - I feel a little at a loss.

I try to be supportive and gentle, but having been a little emotional myself recently I'm worried that I've been rather the opposite at a crucial time. So rather than wallow I just want to refresh find advice on what people suffering really do find supportive.

I'm aware it'll be different for different people at different points but if there are any good threads that go over this or significant websites that deal with the support from this angle I would absolutely love some pointers.

Many thanks :tee:
1
quote
reply
Anonymous #6
#44
Report 7 months ago
#44
how long does it take for my post to be reviewed and how do I know that its been posted?
quote
reply
shadowdweller
  • TSR Support Team
  • Peer Support Volunteers
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#45
Report 6 months ago
#45
(Original post by Anonymous)
how long does it take for my post to be reviewed and how do I know that its been posted?
I'm not sure on the former part of your post I'm afraid, but in terms of the latter, you'll receive a notification to say your post has either been approved or rejected
0
quote
reply
shadowdweller
  • TSR Support Team
  • Peer Support Volunteers
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#46
Report 6 months ago
#46
(Original post by Miss B')
Sorry to burden this thread, as this isn't about me, but I didn't want to distract with my own thread in the forum either:

I've found lots of posts supporting individuals in coping with mental health difficulties but I'm trying to find advice on how to be the person in a relationship with/ living with (some time in the near future fingers crossed :bigsmile:) / supporting someone with OCD, anxiety, depression (in order of decreasing severity.

I've looked online at 'top 10 ways to support' etc but apart from finding them very basic - Number 1: take care of yourself first. (Thanks but I'm fine) - or very contradictory and confusing - Number 2: Talk about OCD openly. Number 3: Don't talk about OCD too much (fml) - I feel a little at a loss.

I try to be supportive and gentle, but having been a little emotional myself recently I'm worried that I've been rather the opposite at a crucial time. So rather than wallow I just want to refresh find advice on what people suffering really do find supportive.

I'm aware it'll be different for different people at different points but if there are any good threads that go over this or significant websites that deal with the support from this angle I would absolutely love some pointers.

Many thanks :tee:
Personally, my main recommendation here would be to talk directly to them about this first and foremost - ask them what kind of things help, or if any behaviours make it more frustrating for them. To some extent it will be unique to each individual, and they'll be able to give the best advice on what helps them.

I'd also say observations can help on some level; don't assume that it will mean you know exactly what they're thinking, but it can give a general idea what might trigger them, or how they calm themselves down in that situation.

To a large degree though, just you being there when they need support will be helping a lot, and letting them talk about it if they need. From the perspective of talking about it, I'd say that when you do talk about it, try to do so openly, but don't push the conversation onto it too often - I can totally understand the confusion around the two bits of advice you mentioned, but my interpretation is like that really, that you should have open and honest conversations about it when you do talk, but that it doesn't need to be a constant topic either.

Finally, I know that the 'Take care of yourself first' part can seem largely irrelevant at times, but please do keep it as a consideration. You're best placed to look after them, and after yourself, if you make sure you're not taking on more than you can handle too!
3
quote
reply
Rigel
Badges: 14
Rep:
?
#47
Report 6 months ago
#47
(Original post by shadowdweller)
Personally, my main recommendation here would be to talk directly to them about this first and foremost - ask them what kind of things help, or if any behaviours make it more frustrating for them. To some extent it will be unique to each individual, and they'll be able to give the best advice on what helps them.

I'd also say observations can help on some level; don't assume that it will mean you know exactly what they're thinking, but it can give a general idea what might trigger them, or how they calm themselves down in that situation.

To a large degree though, just you being there when they need support will be helping a lot, and letting them talk about it if they need. From the perspective of talking about it, I'd say that when you do talk about it, try to do so openly, but don't push the conversation onto it too often - I can totally understand the confusion around the two bits of advice you mentioned, but my interpretation is like that really, that you should have open and honest conversations about it when you do talk, but that it doesn't need to be a constant topic either.

Finally, I know that the 'Take care of yourself first' part can seem largely irrelevant at times, but please do keep it as a consideration. You're best placed to look after them, and after yourself, if you make sure you're not taking on more than you can handle too!
This is really good advice!
2
quote
reply
X

Reply to thread

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Do you like exams?

Yes (133)
18.4%
No (439)
60.72%
Not really bothered about them (151)
20.89%

Watched Threads

View All