Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Hi guys,

    I am looking to start a Masters degree in finance. My top choice is LSE.

    I am an incoming final year student in London, probably will graduate with a 2:1. My question is, what is the timeline and process of applying to LSE and other highly ranked Master's degree programmes?

    Do I need teacher recommendations and things like that? Can I go straight to the Masters programme without working a few years in the industry? I seen it happen but wonder how common that is?

    Thanks a lot!
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    CV Helper
    (Original post by volatilityskew2)
    Hi guys,

    I am looking to start a Masters degree in finance. My top choice is LSE.

    I am an incoming final year student in London, probably will graduate with a 2:1. My question is, what is the timeline and process of applying to LSE and other highly ranked Master's degree programmes?

    Do I need teacher recommendations and things like that? Can I go straight to the Masters programme without working a few years in the industry? I seen it happen but wonder how common that is?

    Thanks a lot!
    It's customary to apply in the first term of your third year of undergrad, ie Oct, Nov, Dec 16 for a start in Oct 17. Check for deadlines, the most competitive courses will have deadlines, in maybe Feb or Mar, others won't. Postgradaute application processes are not centrally controlled or managed, it's up to each institution and each department and course within to decide it's application processes and timelines.

    Yes, you will usually require 2 references, usually from academics on your Undergrad degree.

    It has been usual for people to go straight from undergrad to Masters, but that is changing as there is little or no funding for Masters degrees, so now more people spend a few years in employment and saving up, before going back to Uni.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    It's customary to apply in the first term of your third year of undergrad, ie Oct, Nov, Dec 16 for a start in Oct 17. Check for deadlines, the most competitive courses will have deadlines, in maybe Feb or Mar, others won't. Postgradaute application processes are not centrally controlled or managed, it's up to each institution and each department and course within to decide it's application processes and timelines.

    Yes, you will usually require 2 references, usually from academics on your Undergrad degree.

    It has been usual for people to go straight from undergrad to Masters, but that is changing as there is little or no funding for Masters degrees, so now more people spend a few years in employment and saving up, before going back to Uni.
    Thanks!

    What are the deciding factors in gaining a place on a masters programme? Can you give me a list? How do I go about applying?

    Also how important are references? I don't personally know any professors at my school, or any one who would know me.
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    CV Helper
    (Original post by volatilityskew2)
    Thanks!

    What are the deciding factors in gaining a place on a masters programme? Can you give me a list? How do I go about applying?

    Also how important are references? I don't personally know any professors at my school, or any one who would know me.
    Quality of undergraduate grade
    Strength of references
    Strength of research proposal (is required)

    Then to a much lesser extent, relevant practical/work experience, for some universities, but not all. The very most academic ones, it's about grades and references.

    Get to know your staff on your current degree course and get good grades.

    You need to read each university website for the course you want to do to find out how to apply.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by volatilityskew2)
    Hi guys,

    I am looking to start a Masters degree in finance. My top choice is LSE.

    I am an incoming final year student in London, probably will graduate with a 2:1. My question is, what is the timeline and process of applying to LSE and other highly ranked Master's degree programmes?

    Do I need teacher recommendations and things like that? Can I go straight to the Masters programme without working a few years in the industry? I seen it happen but wonder how common that is?

    Thanks a lot!
    Just to add to ThreePortDrifts excellent advice, in the majority of cases yes you can go straight onto the masters without industry experience (although do double check on the entry requirements section fo the course you want to study), however do bare in mind that if you want a job after rather than to go onto do a Phd, then you will need some work experience.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Quality of undergraduate grade
    Strength of references
    Strength of research proposal (is required)

    Then to a much lesser extent, relevant practical/work experience, for some universities, but not all. The very most academic ones, it's about grades and references.

    Get to know your staff on your current degree course and get good grades.

    You need to read each university website for the course you want to do to find out how to apply.
    Thanks! What about the GMAT?

    Also what about the references for people who work a few years in the industry? They certainly won't be able to get references from teachers from their undergraduate school?
    • Community Assistant
    • CV Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    CV Helper
    (Original post by volatilityskew2)
    Thanks! What about the GMAT?

    Also what about the references for people who work a few years in the industry? They certainly won't be able to get references from teachers from their undergraduate school?
    Define 'few' years - or rather, don't bother, the University will say what they will accept as a referee. However, professional referees, so long as they are told to focus on your academic potential, will weigh just as much. I got into Cambridge fine with professional references, I just explained to my line manager that the Uni would be interested in my ability to deal with facts rationally, work hard, meet deadlines, deal with lots of material effectively etc etc.

    GMAT - it's a figure, it's part of the mix, but it's not going to make a weak application super strong, not totally destroy an otherwise strong application.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by threeportdrift)
    Define 'few' years - or rather, don't bother, the University will say what they will accept as a referee. However, professional referees, so long as they are told to focus on your academic potential, will weigh just as much. I got into Cambridge fine with professional references, I just explained to my line manager that the Uni would be interested in my ability to deal with facts rationally, work hard, meet deadlines, deal with lots of material effectively etc etc.

    GMAT - it's a figure, it's part of the mix, but it's not going to make a weak application super strong, not totally destroy an otherwise strong application.
    Thanks!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.