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I really want to skateboard, but I have mobility issues and am disabled? Watch

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    Okay, so ever since I was around seven or eight I've always loved the idea of skating. Cruising down a street, curving from pedestrians... I don't care about tricks just yet, I just want to be able to confidently cruise, and become 'one' with the board.

    However, I have some complex medical issues. My legs collapse, and I lost the ability to walk when I was 12. I had four years off-and-on in regards to secondary school attendance, and I just haven't got the same muscles other people have got. So my parents are weary about me trying to skateboard, and said I should go on my old scooter to see if I can 'handle' wheels with my condition before I spend my pocket money on a decent board, protective gear, etc.

    I see the logic. And if I lived somewhere a little less populated, I would have no complaints. But my issue is - it's more of a self-conscious issue - a seventeen year old girl on a kick scooter? Surely, people are going to think that's weird? My dad told me I have to spend four weeks using my old scooter consistently, and if my legs can handle it, I can get a skateboard and try it out.

    There's also the issue of me falling off a skateboard, and the complications it'll have for my condition, but if I have a pretty high pain threshold. I might talk it through with my physiotherapists. I just really, really want to skateboard. I do! It's a bit of a childhood dream.

    So, is it really as weird as I think it is for a 17 year old to be on a push scooter? Should I give up on my dream of skateboarding because of my medical condition?

    Anyone want to help me out?
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    Dont give up, i don't think its weird to start with a scooter at all

    (Original post by SteamboatMickey)
    Okay, so ever since I was around seven or eight I've always loved the idea of skating. Cruising down a street, curving from pedestrians... I don't care about tricks just yet, I just want to be able to confidently cruise, and become 'one' with the board.

    However, I have some complex medical issues. My legs collapse, and I lost the ability to walk when I was 12. I had four years off-and-on in regards to secondary school attendance, and I just haven't got the same muscles other people have got. So my parents are weary about me trying to skateboard, and said I should go on my old scooter to see if I can 'handle' wheels with my condition before I spend my pocket money on a decent board, protective gear, etc.

    I see the logic. And if I lived somewhere a little less populated, I would have no complaints. But my issue is - it's more of a self-conscious issue - a seventeen year old girl on a kick scooter? Surely, people are going to think that's weird? My dad told me I have to spend four weeks using my old scooter consistently, and if my legs can handle it, I can get a skateboard and try it out.

    There's also the issue of me falling off a skateboard, and the complications it'll have for my condition, but if I have a pretty high pain threshold. I might talk it through with my physiotherapists. I just really, really want to skateboard. I do! It's a bit of a childhood dream.

    So, is it really as weird as I think it is for a 17 year old to be on a push scooter? Should I give up on my dream of skateboarding because of my medical condition?

    Anyone want to help me out?
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    I'm sorry to hear that you're finding it difficult to pursue your dream.

    However, I'm not sure I'm entirely following - shouldn't you consult your doctor or physio as you say rather than your parents and this whole thing with the scooter? I'm not entirely sure whether being able to use a scooter is indicative of whether you'd be able to skateboard.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    I'm sorry to hear that you're finding it difficult to pursue your dream.

    However, I'm not sure I'm entirely following - shouldn't you consult your doctor or physio as you say rather than your parents and this whole thing with the scooter? I'm not entirely sure whether being able to use a scooter is indicative of whether you'd be able to skateboard.
    I don't think it's indicative either. But my physio said I should be able to if I did enough physio exercises to help with my balance, and got to a stable enough condition, which I have in the past month or so.
 
 
 
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