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    Guys I need your opinions;
    If you guys were to do a course, which program do you think is better..BEng or MEng? and why did you choose your option?
    Any Advantage or Disadvantage between the two?
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    I spoke to a big-wig at the Royal Academy of Engineering (when I was interested in taking a degree in it) and he said that MEng is now expected of all 'good' engineers. So take the MEng!
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    But isn't there a masters in Engineering after?
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    (Original post by J-Curve)
    But isn't there a masters in Engineering after?
    If you do a postgraduate master's in the UK you will not get the same financial support as if you do the thing straight from undergrad (i.e. it will cost you a lot more money). My advice to anyone who is in a subject area that offers undergraduate masters' degree is to do them if they have the option, there are only advantages to be gained by doing so.
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    Doing a masters is cheaper and I plan on pulling my socks up and switching over to a masters (MEng) next year.
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    Do an Meng, that final year is supposed to be alot harder but definatly worth it. You could always just pull out after the third year and end up with an BEng. So you have nothing to loose by doing it really.
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    If you want to work as an Engineer and wish to continue your career in Engineering, then you must either go for MEng / MSc - one of the prerequisites for getting the Chartered Engineer status.

    Otherwise, if you are very sure that you want to work in a non-Engineering company, then a BEng will suffice.
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    bae (aerospace) used to fund the meng route at loughborough
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    (Original post by <A-S-H-I-Q-U-E>)
    If you want to work as an Engineer and wish to continue your career in Engineering, then you must either go for MEng / MSc - one of the prerequisites for getting the Chartered Engineer status.

    Otherwise, if you are very sure that you want to work in a non-Engineering company, then a BEng will suffice.
    is this a new thing then? a few years ago my dad was awarded charter status, and he doesnt have a masters. he had to do some project etc, but it wasnt a masters or through a universiyt.,
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    (Original post by J-Curve)
    But isn't there a masters in Engineering after?
    Undergrad Masters in Engineering aren't the same as Postgrad ones.
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    (Original post by The Boosh)
    is this a new thing then? a few years ago my dad was awarded charter status, and he doesnt have a masters. he had to do some project etc, but it wasnt a masters or through a universiyt.,
    Well.. the advantage of having an MEng or MSc(right after BEng) degree is that one can get the Chartered Engineer status in a few years time rather than working for many years.

    A key feature of engineering higher education in the UK for more than 20 years has been the integrated Masters degree, the MEng. About one third of the total of 17,000 home students entering engineering degree courses annually enter MEng programmes. The MEng is a four year programme (five years in Scotland) which integrates both Honours-level and Masters-level learning. It provides a fast-track way to achieve the academic requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer (otherwise an Honours degree followed by a separate Masters degree) and is designed as a preparation for professional practice. It is different in principle from an MSc in engineering which is generally designed as a stand-alone programme, following an Honours degree, which extends depth of study in a relatively closely defined discipline. The MEng degree achieves its Masters degree character by taking some of the areas of study found in an Honours degree in engineering to a deeper level but equally through integrating all the different aspects—mathematics, science, analysis, design, the economic, social and business context, and engineering practice. This integration is achieved in large measure through individual and group design projects. Generally the Masters level content will be distributed throughout the later stages of an integrated programme of study, rather than simply in the final year. This requires the programme to be designed as an integrated whole. UK-SPEC sets out clearly the learning outcomes which MEng programmes must deliver if they are to be professionally accredited, and these outcome statements have also been adopted by the QAA as its Engineering subject benchmark.

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    From what I've heard its MEng all the way.
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    To give you some insight from someone who really couldn't be bothered with spending yet another year in university on top of my four years (3 year degree + foundation year)...

    I graduated with a 1st class BEng and that has always been seen by employers as on the same level as an MEng (although perhaps not a 1st class MEng), however the only obvious disadvantage now is that in order to become chartered I have to proove that I have undertaken some independent study upto an MEng level (being on a structured graduate training scheme helps in this respect).

    Even with the way things are going for the ECUK (chartered status is loosing its impact a little), I would still recommend an MEng. If you can stomach it.
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    (Original post by black_mamba)
    To give you some insight from someone who really couldn't be bothered with spending yet another year in university on top of my four years (3 year degree + foundation year)...

    I graduated with a 1st class BEng and that has always been seen by employers as on the same level as an MEng (although perhaps not a 1st class MEng), however the only obvious disadvantage now is that in order to become chartered I have to proove that I have undertaken some independent study upto an MEng level (being on a structured graduate training scheme helps in this respect).

    Even with the way things are going for the ECUK (chartered status is loosing its impact a little), I would still recommend an MEng. If you can stomach it.
    I agree with black mamba, the fixation with students for MEng/chartership is absurd, a lot of people in industry refuse to go for chartership for various reasons and plenty of people earn lots with "just" a BEng. That's real world experience, not what your institute will make you think.
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    I'd say BEng if you have no intention of becoming an Engineer and just like the idea of studying it for a while. Apart from that, yes, an MEng will get you chartered status faster but go with whichever you prefer - personally, I have an MEng but no intention of becoming chartered at all because I just don't see the point.
    Final note - a lot of universities will let you switch between the two courses in second year depending on your grades. Most require a 2.1 or better to continue on/switch to an MEng course and if you don't have that at the end of the second year, they'll kick you to the BEng even if you started out on the MEng. In that case, it's better to be on the MEng in the first place as there can be some complications with funding switching from a 3 year to a 4 year course, but it's much easier to go from 4 to 3!
    Jenn xx
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    (Original post by JennLlama)
    I have an MEng but no intention of becoming chartered at all because I just don't see the point.
    You get more letters after your name. And you say what's the point :eek:
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    Being chartered in industry doesn't seem to have any great advantages though. Someone will probably play the 'higher wages' card now, but for a lot of people this isn't essential. Sure, you may get paid more, but you also get paid more if you are an excellent engineer, if you get loads of experience behind you, if you create a good track record for yourself etc etc. Becoming chartered isn't quick and easy, and doesn't guarantee you a better image in the workplace, so some of us opt out simply because its equally as benificial to continue working hard and gaining recognition that way.
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    (Original post by ukebert)
    You get more letters after your name. And you say what's the point :eek:
    If I wanted the letters, I'd just pay the money and become a member of the IET or BCS or something like that I'm happy to work on getting a good reputation without the bureaucracy of chartership.
    Jenn xx
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    ^That's true, but to be MIMechE does cost a bit. I have CertGSMD after my name
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    i have read on this forum that a Master degree done after (ie separate) you BEng degree is not the same as being in a MEng course from the start, i was hoping some one could clear up to as why?

    i mean the only master degrees i have seen for postgraduates is the MSc, so would employers see this as lower then a MEng?

    thanks in advance
 
 
 
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