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Is an engineering graduate always going to earning more money than me? Watch

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    It is pretty frustrating seeing all my old classmates going into engineering and eventually gaining a higher average salary than what I will be getting. I was never good at maths so stuck to a simple science degree, yet it seems like being great at maths alone is the key to earning more money. Am I screwed? Is there anyway I can earn a above average salary with a bio degree? (Besides converting to medicine.)

    I don't to waste a year of my life doing a maths a level/applying for a better degree...but maybe that is the better option for me considering I want higher salary paying jobs?
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    This read like "I'm not interested in taking the time out to improve my skills to meet the prerequisites, but I want to study a degree I'm not at all interested in to enter for an industry I know very little about other than the good pay & benefits."

    "Being great at maths" doesn't yield an engineer a good career; hence why so many people with degrees in pure mathematics/physics are out of jobs. Being a good problem solver, practical thinker and hard worker is why so many engineers earn amazing money; as everybody wants a six figure salary but not many are willing to study 40+ hours a week for 5-6 years to end up working 12 hour days, meeting tight deadlines on high integrity projects with millions of pounds. If this sounds good to you, then I suggest you start looking into retraining!
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    Unless you want to be a proper engineering designer (which doesn't pay that well unless you are very senior or work in software), you can mostly apply to the same jobs with an engineering degree and "simply science" degree. Sure, the former sets you up better for better practical problem solving thinking but at the end of the day, both can end up in high roller, six figure jobs.
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    (Original post by Thighs)
    It is pretty frustrating seeing all my old classmates going into engineering and eventually gaining a higher average salary than what I will be getting. I was never good at maths so stuck to a simple science degree, yet it seems like being great at maths alone is the key to earning more money. Am I screwed? Is there anyway I can earn a above average salary with a bio degree? (Besides converting to medicine.)

    I don't to waste a year of my life doing a maths a level/applying for a better degree...but maybe that is the better option for me considering I want higher salary paying jobs?
    You have to stop thinking about salaries in terms of degrees and start thinking about salaries in terms of market forces and jobs.

    If you were to end up working in high finance (e.g. any front office job at an IB) after your degree, you would 100% be earning way more than any engineering grad out there who elected to go into engineering. Ditto top consulting.

    Similarly if you went on a management trainee scheme and managed to rise up the ranks rapidly, but your engineering pal stayed an engineer, you would make more, much much more.

    Flip it around and let's say you went down the teacher route or you did the PhD path, but your engineer friend became an engineering manager and is still rising up, then yes, you will be earning less.

    So as you can see the salary you get is commensurate to the going market rate (which varies from location to location, and company to company) for the specific job and level you are in/at. Same thing applies to your engineering pals, same thing applies to any graduate of any degree. Those average grad salaries you see attached to various degrees don't tell you anything about your specific earnings potential. Financial firms have a higher market rate than engineering (non-software) do, same thing goes for universities and schools.

    Also, I would say focus more on the JOB itself you would see yourself in rather than salaries, because if you're really good the money will come.

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