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    Is it possible for me to complete A Levels in one year with Mathematics, Economics, Business and Computer Science if I dedicate full concentration to these subjects?
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    I would say probably not but it might be possible depending on how well you pick things up and how well you revise. I did the full Maths A-level along with 3 AS Levels in one year which was already a fair amount of effort so 4 A-levels in a year is a far stretch for even the most intelligent people. It's just the sheer amount of knowledge you'd have to learn in these subjects and it most cases; it's just not worth it. May I ask you why you're considering doing 4 A-levels in one year?
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    (Original post by saadmalikk)
    Is it possible for me to complete A Levels in one year with Mathematics, Economics, Business and Computer Science if I dedicate full concentration to these subjects?
    I've asked this question myself in the past. And it's a no, unless you want to work your arse off, lose sleep and do it on your own not at a school or college. Do an apprenticeship instead, it's a lot better then going to university spending 3 years of your live and getting into massive debt, with the risk of not being able to pay it off all your live. Even if you do get the degree, you might not get a job. There are a lot of postgraduates out there that can't get degree based jobs, on the basis that, so many people now have them. It's a big, overcrowded career market out there. Do an apprenticeship.
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    (Original post by saadmalikk)
    Is it possible for me to complete A Levels in one year with Mathematics, Economics, Business and Computer Science if I dedicate full concentration to these subjects?
    It's possible but I don't know you well enough to say whether or not it's feasible/advisable. That being said, completing the A levels over two years gives you the most security with your grades


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    (Original post by NeverLucky)
    I would say probably not but it might be possible depending on how well you pick things up and how well you revise. I did the full Maths A-level along with 3 AS Levels in one year which was already a fair amount of effort so 4 A-levels in a year is a far stretch for even the most intelligent people. It's just the sheer amount of knowledge you'd have to learn in these subjects and it most cases; it's just not worth it. May I ask you why you're considering doing 4 A-levels in one year?
    Its my age. I'll start A Levels in a week or two and my age is already eighteen. I'm fretting over the possibility of getting my university acceptance rejected because of my age.
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    (Original post by Harold Godwinson)
    I've asked this question myself in the past. And it's a no, unless you want to work your arse off, lose sleep and do it on your own not at a school or college. Do an apprenticeship instead, it's a lot better then going to university spending 3 years of your live and getting into massive debt, with the risk of not being able to pay it off all your live. Even if you do get the degree, you might not get a job. There are a lot of postgraduates out there that can't get degree based jobs, on the basis that, so many people now have them. It's a big, overcrowded career market out there. Do an apprenticeship.
    I'm willing to work 9 extra hours other than my school to complete this task. Will it still be impossible. Keeping in my mind that my work ethic is unquestionable and I've been maintaining a perfect GPA in my last two academic years?
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    Of course. How difficult you will find it depends on many factors, but most importantly your motivation. The amount of work required to learn them won't be at all substantial in the grand scheme of things, but I think that people often find it difficult to maintain momentum with self study. There isn't anything involved in these qualifications that requires specialist tuition (especially given the wealth of online resources now available to students) so the limiting factor will be your ability to direct your own study.

    I really think that in almost every case it would be advisable to take the two years. You are more likely to get better grades, to cultivate a greater set of skills and abilities and to get a better feel for what you are learning. What you learn in an A level is the bare bones of a subject and there is much to be gained from venturing off the beaten path. I think that taking the standard two years better allows for that.

    Best of luck either way.
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    (Original post by saadmalikk)
    Its my age. I'll start A Levels in a week or two and my age is already eighteen. I'm fretting over the possibility of getting my university acceptance rejected because of my age.
    Do an access course instead
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    Yeah I agree with Gilberta, an access course will be much more beneficial if you're dead set on formal education. We could give you better advice if you tell us your long term plan of action, such as are you planning to go to university? And if so, what are you going to study? Baring in mind university is mostly a con these days, so many universities popping up all over the place, basically just acting as businesses after your money. You have to ask yourself, is A levels really going to help me in the long run? Like I said before A levels are becoming devalued because so many people now have them. Having an A level qualification doesn't make you stand out anymore like it used to.
 
 
 
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