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    I'm rather annoyed that neither Oxford nor Cambridge offers English Language, as I want to do this along with French, and not being over-confident but I think I would have quite a good chance of getting in. People are always telling me I should apply there, but I'm like 'well they don't offer the course I want...'
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    I did Literature rather than language at A2 - so not entirely sure what you'd expect "English Language" to encompass at degree level... but you could look at the foreign language with linguistics course?
    http://www.admissions.ox.ac.uk/courses/moli.shtml

    Otherwise - I suppose you just need to assess what's most important to you:
    - Studying English Language/French = petition Oxbridge to offer it, i suspect sucess will be limited - so apply elsewhere.

    - Personally prove you're capable of getting an Oxbridge offer/go to Oxbridge = pick another course you think you'd enjoy to apply for, then make the decision...
    I imagine you could easily write a coherent PS for a mixture of french/english language/linguistic courses! Oxbridge is only one choice.

    - Apply where people tell you to apply = wouldn't recommend that one.

    Hope this helps.
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    So you're saying I could apply for 5 unis which do the course I want (English Language & French) and apply to Oxbridge, maybe Cambridge, for say French/French with Linguistics or whatever? I guess that IS an option...
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    Just looked at that link; it actually pretty much looks like French and English Language! Thanks very much; I'll def. look into that further and consider applying there now
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    Cambridge don't do joint degrees, unless you change Parts midway through the degree.
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    ^ Really? Does the same go for Oxford as well? I don't see why though, they're like the most respected unis and yet don't offer very popular courses...
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    lol
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    ^ ? :p:
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    (Original post by city_chic)
    ^ Really? Does the same go for Oxford as well? I don't see why though, they're like the most respected unis and yet don't offer very popular courses...
    Because, in order to offer joint degrees, they'd have to lower academic standards. In order to be able to do two degrees and sleep, the amount of work for each part would have to be lessenned, resulting in an inferior and poor-quality degree.

    You can sort-of change degree by changing Tripos after Part I, and I'd imagine that it would be possible in the case of French and English as both are reasonably linked. But that's the only way you'll be able to get a joint degree.

    NB. This generalisation excludes Homerton and their joint degrees.
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    (Original post by FadeToBlackout)
    Because, in order to offer joint degrees, they'd have to lower academic standards. In order to be able to do two degrees and sleep, the amount of work for each part would have to be lessenned, resulting in an inferior and poor-quality degree.

    You can sort-of change degree by changing Tripos after Part I, and I'd imagine that it would be possible in the case of French and English as both are reasonably linked. But that's the only way you'll be able to get a joint degree.

    NB. This generalisation excludes Homerton and their joint degrees.
    Umm...SPS, PPE, Land Economy...all seem kind of like joint honors courses to me.

    And are you saying all joint degrees are poor quality?
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    And are you saying all joint degrees are poor quality?
    It's not quite as simple as that, obviously.
    Essentially, you naturally HAVE to study less of each incorporated subject in a joint honours (so, someone doing joint English and History will have good breadth, but nowhere near the DEPTH of knowledge of single-honours English OR History students). In order to get a FULL(ish) education in both parts of joints hons, you would - as Fade suggests - not sleep. That leads to death, normally.

    It's actually the reason I didn't go for History & English joint, funnily enough - I would have got continually frustrated not being able to look deeper into one subject because of the other one raising other equally interesting points. As it is, I took English...in which I can indulge my historically-interested self almost indefinitely - hooray! (All of that rather beside the point)
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    Yes, in the British system, that is the case.

    But why do Oxbridge allow some joint honors courses (e.g. PPP, MHP, Arch and Anth), but not others? Just seems a bit random.
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    But why do Oxbridge allow some joint honors courses (e.g. PPP, MHP, Arch and Anth), but not others? Just seems a bit random.
    I suppose it probably has something to do with the fact that joining up the subjects in a certain way is a very valid practice: some subjects are integral to one another, so it makes sense to study them together for at least soe of the degree.
    Even in English, ALL our papers are called "[A Period] and it's Context". Without contextual (that is, historical, religious, sociological, psychological, artistic, musical, literary, philosophical, even scientific) information, an English student will get a bit lost. but it would be silly to call it a joint hons degree in English History Theology Sociology...etc...! Maybe PPP, PPE, Arch & Anth, etc. just fit together a bit tidier!
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    (Original post by city_chic)
    ^ Really? Does the same go for Oxford as well? I don't see why though, they're like the most respected unis and yet don't offer very popular courses...
    No, it doesn't. Oxford doesn't have a tripos system.
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    (Original post by shady lane)
    Yes, in the British system, that is the case.

    But why do Oxbridge allow some joint honors courses (e.g. PPP, MHP, Arch and Anth), but not others? Just seems a bit random.
    My understanding was that bar for a few exceptions (SPS), the vast majority of joint honours courses are offered by Oxford rather than Cambridge. It tends to be one of the few criteria by which one can actually make a judgement on the universities, as the countless threads on PPE versus straight philosophy, economics, politics, will attest.
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    Hm, interesting.
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    Is English Language A Level not basically linguistics?
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    I wouldn't call Arch and Anth or SPS "joint honours" degrees at all. You do an initial introductory year to four subjects and then choose one to specialise in for the last two years. You'll find that most cambridge degrees follow the "broad part 1 followed by specialised part 2" paradigm. Natsci for example.
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    (Original post by burntgorilla)
    Is English Language A Level not basically linguistics?
    I guess it basically is, yeah.
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    (Original post by city_chic)
    ^ Really? Does the same go for Oxford as well? I don't see why though, they're like the most respected unis and yet don't offer very popular courses...
    Oxbridge, you'll tend to find, aren't bound by the fads of what is popular. They offer far fewer options than many universities - you won't find the "economics, economics and maths, economics and philosophy, economics and politics, economics and management, etc." type lists to choose from. They decide what degrees they think are worthwhile and that they can teach well, and they offer them. Media studies is a hugely popular course, but Oxbridge won't be offering it anytime soon. Why? Because they don't have the resources, the faculty, or consider it a degree they want to teach.

    (Original post by shady lane)
    Umm...SPS, PPE, Land Economy...all seem kind of like joint honors courses to me.

    And are you saying all joint degrees are poor quality?
    SPS and Land Economy aren't joint degrees, they're single honours. Cambridge doesn't offer joint degrees, but uses the tripos to allow you to take different subjects. Oxford offers loads, because Oxford runs degrees they think work, regardless of what disciplines they're in. It's personal preference.

    (Original post by shady lane)
    But why do Oxbridge allow some joint honors courses (e.g. PPP, MHP, Arch and Anth), but not others? Just seems a bit random.
    Oxford does whichever they think go. PPE/E&M works as a multi-disciplinary approach as there's a lot of overlap, and don't believe they work as well taught in a vacuum. Most other degrees allow you to take the single honours version as Oxford believed they can be taught as a standalone degree well. PPP I never quite got, but most others seem sensible. There is a difference, however, between multi-disciplinary single honours degrees and joint honours ones. For example, Classics is a single honours, but E&M is a joint honours.
 
 
 

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