Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In general, how much maths will an undergraduate do in a physics degree and how difficult is the maths compared to regular A level?

    I was wondering if I should be thinking about doing a physics and maths course instead of a single physics degree.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Very Important Poster
    • PS Reviewer
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Very Important Poster
    PS Reviewer
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Check degree content. If math is an entry requirement then expect a step up. If not then you'll probably get the required support.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am aware of the content of multiple courses that I have researched. However I am not sure how much maths each module will entail, which is why I am debating a joint honors of physics and maths because that way there would be some core maths modules.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by _Anon')
    I am aware of the content of multiple courses that I have researched. However I am not sure how much maths each module will entail, which is why I am debating a joint honors of physics and maths because that way there would be some core maths modules.
    In general you'll cover as much as maths as all of the core and mechanics A level Maths modules plus some more detail, as well as vector calculus and Fourier analysis. You might do more maths in a theoretical route (add complex analysis and group theory). Maths as practiced in a physics degree is very different to maths as practiced in a maths degree however. The latter focuses far more on proofs and logical flawlessness. May I ask what you specifically want the maths training for?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was just unsure if there would be enough maths implemented into the physics degree as I would like, because if not then I would choose to take the joint honors enabling me to do more maths throughout the course. I do not need it for any particular reason, just to know if there will be enough to keep me occupied without taking extra modules etc.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Physics, Theoretical Physics, Mathematical Physics, Physics with Mathematics Major/minor), Physics and Maths (joint honours), Maths with optional physics focussed modules. I may have missed some variations

    There is such a broad range of different courses with different modules available then I think you need to look at some more courses, or more specifically the modules that each course and university offers
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I've been looking at Physics, Physics and Maths joint honors and Physics with Astronomy.
    However many Physics and Astronomy courses are just normal physics degrees with compulsory Astronomy modules.
    I have looked into each module on the Physics courses, however as I have never done these topics before I am unaware of the amount of maths they involve, which is what my question is about.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I was told that the maths in physics courses gets more rigorous as the prestige of that university goes up by a Bristol undergraduate who's now at Oxford. He said places like Oxbridge, Imperial, Durham etc. have about as much maths in their regular physics courses as some other Russell Group unis have in their combined maths and physics courses. The maths is definitely a lot more difficult so get ready for a jump regardless of where you go and try taking further maths modules if you can to make it all slightly less painful. So if you don't want to do as much maths, you should probably consider applying to regular physics courses at most unis and the maths and physics/theoretical physics courses at those unis if you'd like to do more maths. If you're looking to go to unis that are high up in the rankings (but seriously don't worry about those rankings because a physics education is fantastic regardless of where you are) then be prepared for difficult maths and a whole lot more of it. Of course, this is all hearsay and I really only have experience with the content of one uni in particular so take from that what you will.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.