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    Basically, for my A2 Coursework next year, I need to write a critique of one (or preferably compare two) French films and over the past 3 weeks, we've been watching films in class to make sure we pick the ones which are best for us. Despite the fact that the films have English subtitles, I was wondering whether it was necessary (on a skills based level for applying to Uni this year) that I should be able to understand what the characters are saying, because quite frankly, I can't hear what they're saying at all. Everything seems to be a big blur of sounds Is this normal, or should I start doing more listening practise during the holidays to get me up to a bit of a higher standard in it? Also, will Unis expect me to be able to understand French films by the time I go there? I've always been confident with listening, and this has just pulled me down a bit Sorry if this seems pedantic everybody. Any replys are greatly appreciated.
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    Just after the exams, we watched the two Bridget Jones films in French at school and I think it's a safe bet to say we were all having the same problem, particularly when the characters were mumbling and such. (I guess it's too much to ask for them to project their voices nice and clearly at all times! ). So as far as that goes, I wouldn't really worry about it too much, as everyone in my class, including myself, is in the same boat it seems. I guess it all comes with practise, or atleast I hope it does!

    We did watch the first with French subtitles which did help in following what was being said, although the characters never actually said what the subtitles did.

    As for university applications go, obviously I can't really answer as I'm in the same position as you, but I'd say (hope) that they'd be rather understanding hehe!

    I personally find listening by far the hardest of language skills (particularly in French), especially when things are said at the pace they are in films and such. So I think just exposing yourself to spoken French/German by watching films and listening to radio/music etc would be the best way to improve. As clichéd as it sounds, I guess practise really does make perfect!

    EDIT: Nice coursework idea by the way! Coursework hasn't even been mentioned to my classes yet, guess it's something I should start thinking about!
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    Only in the last 6 months or so have I been able to listen to French people speaking and understand what they were saying. And not even all the time. I wouldn't worry about it too much.
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    I did my A2 work on the François Truffaut "Les Aventures D'Antoine Doinel". I didn't understand much at all.
    Yay for subtitles.
    You'll be fine, but practise a little before Uni
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    It's reassuring that I'm not alone here then I don't really have the same problem in German, but in that subject it's rather a lack of vocabulary.:cool:
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    I wouldn't worry - if you can understand everything they say, then you can understand native speakers at their native pace, which means you can understand French at a native pace, which means you wouldn't really need to go to uni, therefore defeating the object. I hope that makes sense

    Have you tried watching the films with French subtitles (if they're available)? Sometimes I find it difficult to understand what people are saying in English TV/Films, when they mumble or talk fast(even though I am English :P)so I often have subtitles on. This may help you, perhaps.
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    (Original post by LucyA)
    I wouldn't worry - if you can understand everything they say, then you can understand native speakers at their native pace, which means you can understand French at a native pace, which means you wouldn't really need to go to uni, therefore defeating the object. I hope that makes sense

    Have you tried watching the films with French subtitles (if they're available)? Sometimes I find it difficult to understand what people are saying in English TV/Films, when they mumble or talk fast(even though I am English :P)so I often have subtitles on. This may help you, perhaps.
    Yeah, that makes sense

    I've borrowed two from school for the holidays, and they only have English subtitles:p:
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    (Original post by wesetters)
    No worries. Believe me, a lot of people on my course (including me, a lot of the time) can't understand all of what is being said in some films. At A level I really wouldn't worry about it.
    Hmmm, so I won't be expected to be able to understand all of the words of a film when I first go to Uni? I was just worrying incase it was required and couldn't really compare myself against the others in my class because half of them can't understand what's being said at higher listening GCSE let alone a French person in a French film:p:
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    I compared 'La Haine' to the 2005 race riots. I guess you could compare it to 'Les Visiteurs', haha, and explore the different genre used to explore racial tensions in France, using Les Visiteurs as an extended metaphor for such problems.
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    (Original post by phil_m88)
    I compared 'La Haine' to the 2005 race riots. I guess you could compare it to 'Les Visiteurs', haha, and explore the different genre used to explore racial tensions in France, using Les Visiteurs as an extended metaphor for such problems.
    That's the thing, there's so much which can be said about 'La Haine', from history to production etc, but I simply don't like the film. Having to watch the film over and over again would kill me
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    (Original post by wesetters)
    Talk about La bataille d'Alger I love that film (not technically French, but it should be close enough I'd have thought).
    I'm open to suggestions, but the film has to (apparently) be set in France (?), relate to French culture, be spoken in French, be directed by a French director and have French actors and actresses:confused: Whether all of that needs to be true who knows, but hey....I can only try can't I?:p:
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    (Original post by wesetters)
    Algeria was technically part of France when it was made , and it has French actors...pity the director's Italian...
    Bof, never mind I'll try to get my hands on it and watch it nonetheless
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    I know it seems extremely obvious, but you could just do a comparison between Three Colours Blue and Three Colours Red (doing Three Colours White would be a bit pointless seeing as most of it is set in Poland ). There's loads you could do for that, social tensions, ideas of progression, of age, of experience - it's bursting with artistic content to get your teeth stuck into.

    I know the director of this trilogy is Polish, but it seems a bit extreme to be demanding that seemingly every single participant in the film is French - what board are you with?
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    (Original post by felixlechat)
    I know it seems extremely obvious, but you could just do a comparison between Three Colours Blue and Three Colours Red (doing Three Colours White would be a bit pointless seeing as most of it is set in Poland ). There's loads you could do for that, social tensions, ideas of progression, of age, of experience - it's bursting with artistic content to get your teeth stuck into.

    I know the director of this trilogy is Polish, but it seems a bit extreme to be demanding that seemingly every single participant in the film is French - what board are you with?
    OCR. I think I may have picked my teacher up wrong when she was saying it has to relate to everything 'French':p: Afterall, as long as it refers to French culture and society then it is surely a viable choice
 
 
 
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