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Which is the best route /qualification urgent help regarding Accounting ... watch

  • View Poll Results: Which qualification is the best to get into the Accounting route...
    CIMA
    0
    0%
    ACCA
    22.22%
    ACA
    62.96%
    AAT Foundation
    0
    0%
    Open University - Certificate in Accounting
    14.81%

    • Thread Starter
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    Hi all

    Can you please kindly vote and let me know which qualification is the best to get into the accounting route...

    I was looking at the open university they do a certificate in accounting and that leads to proffesional quallifications ? I was wondering whether this is a good route to be taken into a successful accountant , also one of my family friends are doing Accounting and they sugessted AAT Foundation...is that any good?

    please do help me as i have very little time to make a major decision!

    love to all!
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    it depends on what kind of education you already have and what level you are at (age/experience)

    CIME/ACA/ACCA you can probably only do them if you have a certain number of A levels and companies will usually only pay for you to do them if you are at a certain level

    AAT is better if you have no experience and no a levels - that can then build towards the ACCA etc

    i woudl avoid the OU as far as i know its not a well know qualification and is never asked for on job adverts but the other 4 are.

    the first 4 generally involve working and learnign at the same time.
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    I have just finished my A-levels, grade predictions of ABC dont know if thats ok or not? im 18 and currently working for a tax company.
    So i dont know if that matters or not , but would it be better if I did CIMA,ACA,aCCA ?

    And how would I begin?

    thanks for your response btw
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    Is going to Uni out of the question? If so I'd do that then ACA at a big 4 to begin with.
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    Due to a lot of responsibilty, I decided not to go to a university, that is why Open University Appealed to me , I have an option of doing an Open Degree, however Accountancy is one thing I am interested in, so I am stuck in the middle of the two, but I do intend to do accountancy at some point but was wondering whether a certificate in Accounting would be fine and lead to higher professional qualifications, or whether I finished my OU degree..?
    So i need to decide, with the options I currently have.

    Oh btw i know this may sound silly, but I have heard a lot of people using the term Big 4 what does that mean?

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    the 4 biggest acocuntancy company

    if u have your heart set on acocuntancy and you are with a tax company already go for the ACCA or ACA (CIMA is for somehting slightly different) - you can start by asking your company if hey are ok with it and ok for you to take tiem off to study and also if they might pay?
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    thanks
    I did ask my company, however the lady said she will sponser me but she left ufff, but this other lady refuses as she said im not in an accountancy yet,until I be then they would do something. Its bugging. Also they wont give me time off, I always have to make up my hours later on, they want me in all the time as my manager is quite picky with me to comming in, she says apprantly im good at what i do and she wants me there. but its probably an excuse *shrugs*

    Do u have the link for the BIG 4 ? So i can find out more information about them...

    thanks for all the help so far guys!
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    Correct me If I am wrong, but you need either AAT, or a degree before you can train for ACA/ACCA - Well atleast thats how I read up. A level students usually - to get ACA/ACCA must go through AAT-ACA, which is 4 years total.
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    (Original post by ma2k5)
    Correct me If I am wrong, but you need either AAT, or a degree before you can train for ACA/ACCA - Well atleast thats how I read up. A level students usually - to get ACA/ACCA must go through AAT-ACA, which is 4 years total.
    your wrong

    ACCA:
    Minimum entry requirements

    * two A Levels and three GCSEs or equivalent in five separate subjects, including English and Mathematics.

    You can see the ACA oens here:
    http://www.icaew.com/careers/facts/entry_req01.htm

    The ACA generally seem to always take on degree holders. Their page says that 63% of their 2005 intake had very high UCAS points (likely they all went to Uni)

    Each company is different so you will need to check their requirements seperatley.
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    (Original post by Le_désir)
    thanks


    Do u have the link for the BIG 4 ? So i can find out more information about them...

    thanks for all the help so far guys!
    their names are

    Price Waterhouse Coopers (PwC)
    KPMG
    Ernst and Young
    Deloitte

    After them there are
    Grant Thornton
    BDO Stoy Hayward
    Tenon

    etc etc

    Even if you don't go for the big 4 there are stil lquite a few other national companies that probably take on inexperienced/non degree people.
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    I voted for ACCA because apparently it has more recognition internationally, while still serving you well in the UK.
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    ACCA want everyone to think it's an internationally recognised qualification - they *try* to market it as an international qualification, but thats actually a load of rubbish. ACCA make regional variations to their syllabus to allow for legal/tax differences etc, but essentially the exams that someone sits in Africa are very similar to those in the UK. ACCA has persued growth overseas because it's status in the UK is lower when compared to the CA or ACA qualification.
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    What? How is it rubbish? ACCA is a more internationally recognised qualification. The fact that it makes regional variations of its papers to factor in different laws and such of different countries is irrelevant - as you said, its papers are very similar regardless. ACCA is a qualification that will be recognised by any accountancy firm around the globe, where as ACA/CA isn't.
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    It isn't irrelevant; the variations exist so that ACCA can sell their qualification to foreign professions who don't have an established qualification system like the UK does. The qualification is only recognised because it has been tailored for local professions, a UK qualified ACCA wouldn't necessarily gain automatic accreditation from a foreign professional body that also uses ACCA.

    The point I was trying to make is the ACCA isn't an international qualification, no such thing exists. The reason the ACCA is more recognisable around the world is because the organisation has long pursued a strategy of growth overseas taking advantage of fledgling professions in developing countries. The ACA doesn't have the same 'international' status because they stopped trying to export the qualification in the early 20th century.
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    Automatic accreditation isn't the point though. The fact of the matter is that employers of finance all around the globe recognise the ACCA qualification as a respectable and rigorous qualification. Though the details with regards to taxation and law might change depending on the region, the framework is still the same, which is the important point.

    ACA is becoming increasingly niche and outdated - the qualification relies solely on its reputation of the past and the fact that many finance professionals in the UK today still see it as the gold standard qualification due to the fact that they did it when they were training. This can't and won't go on forever - and in other parts of the world thats exactly whats happening, which is why ACCA is growing massively compared to other accounting bodies.
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    (Original post by Clubber Lang)
    your wrong

    ACCA:
    Minimum entry requirements

    * two A Levels and three GCSEs or equivalent in five separate subjects, including English and Mathematics.

    You can see the ACA oens here:
    http://www.icaew.com/careers/facts/entry_req01.htm

    The ACA generally seem to always take on degree holders. Their page says that 63% of their 2005 intake had very high UCAS points (likely they all went to Uni)

    Each company is different so you will need to check their requirements seperatley.
    If you don't have a degree, you will need to do the AAT before you start your ACA course.
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    (Original post by x.narb.x)
    Automatic accreditation isn't the point though. The fact of the matter is that employers of finance all around the globe recognise the ACCA qualification as a respectable and rigorous qualification. Though the details with regards to taxation and law might change depending on the region, the framework is still the same, which is the important point.

    ACA is becoming increasingly niche and outdated - the qualification relies solely on its reputation of the past and the fact that many finance professionals in the UK today still see it as the gold standard qualification due to the fact that they did it when they were training. This can't and won't go on forever - and in other parts of the world thats exactly whats happening, which is why ACCA is growing massively compared to other accounting bodies.
    With all due respect to the people who do ACCA, doesn't only the elite end up doing ACA? ...i.e. Works in a Big 4, Grad...etc. However any school leaver can start ACCA without any pre courses needed as Clubber has shown, that must put ACA on a higher standard than ACCA globally, no?
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    Yeah exactly, the ACCA is growing fast in other parts of the world. 69% of new ACCA students between 2000 and 2005 were overseas students. Of course the ACCA is going to grow massively compared to the other professional accounting bodies in the UK, ACCA and CIMA are the only two bodies out of the CCAB that are pursuing vigorous overseas growth. I don't dispute that ACCA is growing rapidly overseas.

    But if we focus on the UK, after all I'm assuming that the OP intends to practice in the UK, the CA or ACA qualifications continue to be held in higher regard than the ACCA. One of the main reasons for the ACCA pursuing overseas growth is its comparably lower reputation in the UK. I'm sure the ACCA will continue to enjoy strong growth worldwide, but it's unlikely that the CA or ACA will lose their status as the qualification of choice among the leading practitioners in the UK.
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    Any school leaver can do ACA too. I got offered the chance to do ACA or ACCA with just A-levels.

    The actual difference between ACA exams and ACCA exams is tiny. Increasingly you find that people don't care whether you are ACA or ACCA qualified anymore - the qualifications are of almost equal standing in accountancy. The only discrepancy occurs when you look at industries such as investment banking where recruiters stipulate ACA as a requirement. This isn't because ACA is better than ACCA as such, its because the kind of candidates they want(High A-level/degree grades working at a big 4) tend to have ACA rather than ACCA.
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    (Original post by fubu)
    Yeah exactly, the ACCA is growing fast in other parts of the world. 69% of new ACCA students between 2000 and 2005 were overseas students. Of course the ACCA is going to grow massively compared to the other professional accounting bodies in the UK, ACCA and CIMA are the only two bodies out of the CCAB that are pursuing vigorous overseas growth. I don't dispute that ACCA is growing rapidly overseas.

    But if we focus on the UK, after all I'm assuming that the OP intends to practice in the UK, the CA or ACA qualifications continue to be held in higher regard than the ACCA. One of the main reasons for the ACCA pursuing overseas growth is its comparably lower reputation in the UK. I'm sure the ACCA will continue to enjoy strong growth worldwide, but it's unlikely that the CA or ACA will lose their status as the qualification of choice among the leading practitioners in the UK.
    Of course, I was never disputing this fact. ACA is without a doubt the best qualification to get in the UK and is the qualification held in the highest regard, mainly because of the "old school" attitude that I mentioned. As far as wordwide options go though, ACCA is the better qualification to have, and in the future, ACCA will probably overtake ACA in the UK too.
 
 
 
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