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    I have applied to do Adult Nursing and I have high hopes of getting a place.
    I would like to ask how you can build yourself up from a Band 5 to a Band 6 nurse.
    What are other options for nurses such as being specialists.
    Can I as a nurse build my own clinic in an underdeveloping country?
    Overall, what are the different pathways for nurses? How can I build myself up from a nurse with a degree to something else?

    Thank you
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    (Original post by theoneinthearm)
    I have applied to do Adult Nursing and I have high hopes of getting a place.
    I would like to ask how you can build yourself up from a Band 5 to a Band 6 nurse.
    What are other options for nurses such as being specialists.
    Can I as a nurse build my own clinic in an underdeveloping country?
    Overall, what are the different pathways for nurses? How can I build myself up from a nurse with a degree to something else?

    Thank you
    I can't really answer all of your questions in great detail as there are so many options. There are entire books written on the topics and even then there are probably other options possible. Your uni library will likely have information on this.

    To go from band 5 to 6 generally is through experience rather than qualifications. You will need to be able to demonstrate that you are ready to take a leadership role and the responsibility that comes along with it. You can then apply for a band 6 post and whether you get it depends whether you have the required experience. In the private sector it can be easier to progress to a senior staff nurse role more quickly.*

    There are hundreds of possible specialisms for nurses to enter, in pretty much any area you can imagine. Some band 5 entry-level posts are quite specialised, whereas others cover a broader range of specialities. Some newly-qualified nurses take a more generalised role whereas others realise they want to nurse patients with a specific condition, or a specific patient group. There are a huge range of options at all levels of the pay scale.

    This is a tricky one as policies and laws vary hugely across different countries. Generally you would need to apply for registration in these countries and meet their requirements and get the relevant visa, but in theory, this would be possible. Obviously experience working there would help you to work out the needs of the client base and work out how much of your services you can reasonably offer. There are many many charities overseas that deal with patients living in poverty that you could work for.

    Realistically, you need experience in that area (or a closely related one) as your main priority. You can also do further qualifications such as a masters to assist you in this, however for band 6 posts, this is not usually a requirement. For roles in the community, prescribing, for example, is really useful but is generally organised in conjunction with your employer. To become a diabetic specialist nurse, for example, you would ideally want experience working in a diabetic ward and then do a diabetes short course. Depending what you want to do, you can progress into more of a management role, or go into research or teaching. Often, but not always, the higher banded roles (8 and some band 7) mean you have less patient contact and work more as a team leader. Have a look on the NHS Jobs website and look at the various prerequisites for the sort of roles you might be interested in. Many offer to assist applicants with attaining the required qualifications so this isn't something necessarily to worry about.

    Hope this helps and if you have any more questions or want anything clarified I'm happy to help. **
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    Some clinical environments expect you to have, or be working towards a postgrad qualification relevant to the clinical area to be eligible for a band six position, others just need you to be the ward managers favourite. It's quite variable.
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    Have less of a superiority complex attitude towards junior doctors
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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    Some clinical environments expect you to have, or be working towards a postgrad qualification relevant to the clinical area to be eligible for a band six position, others just need you to be the ward managers favourite. It's quite variable.
    PRSOM

    the levle of management oversight of Ward Managers in the NHS is seriously messed up - micromanagement of some things yet far too much freedom / lack of oversight in other service critical things ...
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    (Original post by Pinkberry_y)
    Have less of a superiority complex attitude towards junior doctors
    an experienced RN has a better understanding of both the patients and the speciality than any junior doctor ... especially foundation doctors .
 
 
 
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